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I am compiling below by getting address of a variable which was selected using a ternary operator. I am getting below error.

error: lvalue required as unary '&' operand.

#define GETINT() ((a==1) ? b : c)
void main()
{
   int a = 1, b = 2, c = 3;
   int *ptr = &GETINT();

   printf("%d\n", *ptr);
}

I have lot of instances like this in my code, so i am expecting a solution which would involve probably just changing the macro alone, but not as #define GETINT() ((a==1) ? &b : &c), as i am using this to select the integer among b and c in few other places in my code. In-case if there is no solution can anyone explain what's wrong with it. BTW, this code got compiled with Green Hills C compiler but giving problem in GCC 4.8

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  • Expanding a little on existing answers - the conditional ? : expression is evaluated at run-time. It returns a value which need not have a specific address (typically, it will be in a CPU register). So in general, the & can't guarantee to give a sensible address for the result - which is approximately why the result is defined to be an "rvalue" rather than an "lvalue". – Steve314 May 5 '15 at 15:01
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The problem is exactly what the compiler says, that the argument to & must be an lvalue, and you pass an expression using ?: instead.

You also can't do this, for the same reason:

((a == 1) ? b : c) = 4711;  /* BAD CODE */

You really should include the & inside the macro, and just dereference when you want the actual value:

#define GETINTPTR(a)  ((a == 1) ? &b : &c)
#define GETINT(a)     *GETINTPTR(a)

Of course the GETINT() macro is kind of silly and you could just use *GETINTPTR() directly in your code.

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  • Thanks unwind, ((a == 1) ? b : c) = 4711; this made me understand the problem. – vimal prathap May 6 '15 at 6:09
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As per the C11 standards, chapter 6.5.15, conditional expression,

[...] the result is the value of the second or third operand (whichever is evaluated), converted to the type described below.(110)

and, realted, footnote (110)

A conditional expression does not yield an lvalue.

OTOH, as per chapter 6.5.3.2, (emphasis mine)

The operand of the unary & operator shall be either a function designator, the result of a [] or unary * operator, or an lvalue that designates an object that is not a bit-field and is not declared with the register storage-class pecifier.

So, your code is not valid.

Solution: Write your MACRO like

 #define GETINT(a,b,c) ((a==1) ? &b : &c)

and use it like

int *ptr = GETINT(a,b,c);
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  • Although, notes are not normative. The normative text that says what you want would be result is the value of the second or third operand emphasis on value. – Shafik Yaghmour May 5 '15 at 14:48
  • @ShafikYaghmour sir, I just quoted the related footnote. However, as per your suggestion,updated my asnwer. Hope it's better now. – Sourav Ghosh May 5 '15 at 14:54
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If you expand &GETINT() you get

&((a==1) ? b : c)

and this is not valid C.

You need this:

#define GETINT() ((a==1) ? &b : &c)
....
int *ptr = GETINT();
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  • Isn't the question why this isn't valid? – juanchopanza May 5 '15 at 14:44
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Finally I fixed the issue, by just changing macro alone which serves both of my purposes. #define GETINT() (*((a==1) ? &b : &c))

Below is the code now,

#define GETINT() (*((a==1) ? &b : &c))
void main()
{
   int a = 1, b = 2, c = 3;
   int *ptr = &GETINT();
   int d = GETINT();

   printf("%d %d\n", *ptr, d);
}

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