48

Can someone explain when and when not to use a 'weak' assignment to a delegate pointer in Swift, and why?

My understanding is that if you use a protocol that is not defined as a class you cannot, nor want to, assign your delegate pointer to weak.

protocol MyStructProtocol{
    //whatever
}

struct MyStruct {
    var delegate: MyStructProtocol?
}

However, when your protocol is defined as a class type protocol then you DO want to set your delegate to a weak pointer?

protocol MyClassProtocol: class{
    //whatever
}

class MyClass {
    weak var delegate: MyClassProtocol?
}

Am I correct? In Apple's swift guide there class protocol examples aren't using weak assignments, but in my testing I'm seeing strong reference cycles if my delegates aren't weakly referenced.

5

3 Answers 3

55

You generally make class protocols weak to avoid the risk of a “strong reference cycle” (formerly known as a “retain cycle”). (Note, we now do that by adding the AnyObject protocol to a protocol’s inheritance list; see Class-Only Protocols; we do not use the class keyword anymore.) Failure to make the delegate weak does not mean that you inherently have a strong reference cycle, but merely that you could have one.

With struct types, though, the strong reference cycle risk is greatly diminished because struct types are not “reference” types, so it is harder to create strong reference cycle. But if the delegate object is a class object, then you might want to make the protocol a class protocol and make it weak.

In my opinion, making class delegates weak is only partially to alleviate the risk of a strong reference cycle. It also is a question of ownership. Most delegate protocols are situations where the object in question has no business claiming ownership over the delegate, but merely where the object in question is providing the ability to inform the delegate of something (or request something of it). E.g., if you want a view controller to have some text field delegate methods, the text field has no right to make a claim of ownership over the view controller.

11
  • 1
    Would love to see an example of when a struct protocol creates a strong reference cycle, and when it doesn't, but this answer has cleared things up for me a lot.
    – nwales
    May 5, 2015 at 17:19
  • so according to your gist, If I am understanding things correctly, the SnakesAndLadders example in Apples Swift documentation would be creating a strong reference cycle through it's DiceGameDelegate? developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Swift/Conceptual/…
    – nwales
    May 5, 2015 at 18:05
  • No strong reference cycle there. Consider the object ownership graph. Imagine some master object (e.g. view controller or whatever) that owns tracker and game. And game also has strong reference to tracker. But there's no circular strong reference cycle. Everything is OK. To have a strong reference cycle, you'd need the delegate for game to refer back to the object that, itself owns game. But that's not the case there. Thus no strong reference cycle.
    – Rob
    May 5, 2015 at 18:13
  • 2
    Absolutely. In an object hierarchy, a child object should not maintain strong references to the parent object. That is a red flag, indicating a strong reference cycle. Note, in this VC example, the strong reference cycle won’t always manifest itself as a leak, but it can in special cases, so one is well advised to avoid the potential problem altogether by making the delegate a weak property.
    – Rob
    Feb 7, 2018 at 14:58
  • 1
    @nwales using Rob's comments, I wrote a more crystal clear example here of where lack of weak will not create strong reference cycles.
    – mfaani
    Oct 7, 2019 at 20:26
13

As Rob said:

It's really a question of "ownership"

That's very true. 'Strong reference cycle' is all about getting that ownership right.

In the following example, we're not using weak var. Yet both objects will deallocate. Why?

protocol UserViewDelegate: class {
    func userDidTap()
}

class Container {
    let userView = UserView()
    let delegate = Delegate()
    init() {
        userView.delegate = delegate
    }

    deinit {
        print("container deallocated")
    }
}

class UserView {
    var delegate: UserViewDelegate?

    func mockDelegatecall() {
        delegate?.userDidTap()
    }

    deinit {
        print("UserView deallocated")
    }
}

class Delegate: UserViewDelegate {
    func userDidTap() {
        print("userDidTap Delegate callback in separate delegate object")
    }
}

Usage:

var container: Container? = Container()
container?.userView.mockDelegatecall()
container = nil // will deallocate both objects

Memory ownership graph (doesn't have cycle)

    +---------+container +--------+
    |                             |
    |                             |
    |                             |
    |                             |
    |                             |
    |                             |
    v                             v
userView +------------------> delegate

In order to create a strong reference cycle, the cycle needs be complete. delegate needs to point back to container but it doesn't. So this isn't an issue. But purely for ownership reasons and as Rob has said here:

In an object hierarchy, a child object should not maintain strong references to the parent object. That is a red flag, indicating a strong reference cycle

So regardless of leaking, still use weak for your delegate objects.


In the following example, we're not using weak var. As a result neither of the classes will deallocate.

protocol UserViewDelegate: class {
    func userDidTap()
}

class Container: UserViewDelegate {
    let userView = UserView()

    init() {
        userView.delegate = self
    }

    func userDidTap() {
        print("userDidTap Delegate callback by Container itself")
    }
    deinit {
        print("container deallocated")
    }
}

class UserView {
    var delegate: UserViewDelegate?

    func mockDelegatecall() {
        delegate?.userDidTap()
    }

    deinit {
        print("UserView deallocated")
    }
}

Usage:

var container: Container? = Container()
container?.userView.mockDelegatecall()
container = nil // will NOT deallocate either objects

Memory ownership graph (has cycle)

     +--------------------------------------------------+
     |                                                  |
     |                                                  |
     +                                                  v
 container                                           userview
     ^                                                  |
     |                                                  |
     |                                                  |
     +------+userView.delegate = self //container+------+

using weak var will avoid the strong reference cycle

9

Delegates should always generally be weak.

Lets say b is the delegate of a. Now a's delegate property is b.

In a case where you want b to release when c is gone

If c holds a strong reference to b and c deallocates, you want b to deallocate with c. However, using a strong delegate property in a, b will never get deallocated since a is holding on to b strongly. Using a weak reference, as soon as b loses the strong reference from c, b will dealloc when c deallocs.

Usually this is the intended behaviour, which is why you would want to use a weak property.

3
  • 3
    I am still confused. If I cannot assign weak to a non class type protocol, Does that mean it will cause a retain cycle? When do I use class protocols vs non-class protocols? If I am using a struct to I only use non class protocols vs class protocols with a class?
    – nwales
    May 5, 2015 at 15:45
  • 1
    @nwales I know this was an old comment, but you use class protocol if both (a) you are using reference (class) types; and (b) you need a weak reference. Otherwise, it's unnecessary to declare it as class protocol. Only specify class if your protocol requires it (e.g. it's a delegate protocol). So, either if you're using struct (a value type) or you're using class but don't need to worry about strong reference cycles (e.g. a protocol that is used for something other than defining a delegate interface), then don't make it a class protocol.
    – Rob
    Feb 7, 2018 at 15:33
  • 4
    FWIW, it's a little strong to say delegates should always be weak. Consider URLSession, which keeps a strong reference to its delegate until the session is invalidated. This only works, though, because they're manually resolving the strong reference when the session is invalidated. But as a general rule of thumb, this is correct, that delegates are generally weak properties. +1
    – Rob
    Feb 7, 2018 at 16:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.