14

The Itanium ABI specifies that, with a couple uninteresting exceptions, the return type is included in the mangled names of template instantions but not non-templates.

Why is this? In what case could you have two function template instantiations where the linker needs to distinguish them because it is not indicative of a one-definition-rule violation or similar?

As an example of what I mean:

class ReturnType {};
class ParamType {};

template <typename T>
ReturnType foo(T p)  {
    return ReturnType();
};
template ReturnType foo<ParamType>(ParamType);

ReturnType bar(ParamType p) {
    return ReturnType();
}

Then the resulting object file has manglings:

ReturnType foo<ParamType>(ParamType)
   => _Z3fooI9ParamTypeE10ReturnTypeT_
                        ^^^^^^^^^^^^

ReturnType bar(ParamType)
   => _Z3bar9ParamType

Why does foo need ReturnType mangled but bar doesn't?

(I am presuming there is a reason and it's not just an arbitrary choice.)

16

Maybe because, as opposed to normal functions, a function templates signature contains the return type? §1.3:

1.3.17 signature <function> name, parameter type list (8.3.5), and enclosing namespace (if any)
[ Note: Signatures are used as a basis for name mangling and linking.end note ]


1.3.18 signature <function template> name, parameter type list (8.3.5), enclosing namespace (if any), return type, and template parameter list

Consider that we can have two entirely distinct function template overloads that only differ in their return type, if written thusly:

template <int>
char foo();

template <int>
int foo();

If name mangling wouldn't consider the return type, linking those templates would prove difficult, since foo<0> does not uniquely name one specialization. Still, one specialization can be addressed using overload resolution (without arguments):

int (*funptr)() = foo<0>;   

On the other hand, including the return type is not necessary for ordinary functions, as these cannot be overloaded on their return type - i.e. their signature does not include the return type.

| improve this answer | |
  • Really nice example. I was also thinking - could the ODR be violated if the return type was not part of the signature? E.g. if you have the first template in TU 0 and the second in TU 1. – dyp May 5 '15 at 16:08
  • @dyp Yes, IIRC the declarations must consist of the same sequence of tokens (or an equivalent sequence of tokens, for some definition of equivalent), if they appertain to the same entity. – Columbo May 5 '15 at 16:09
  • I think we might be misunderstanding each other - what I meant was answered more or less in your final paragraph: The name is used for linking, and it must contain the return type. Otherwise, the linker might link the first template in declared (not defined) in TU 0 with the second template defined and instantiated in TU 1. – dyp May 5 '15 at 16:11
  • Your example shows a case where the two template functions are mutually exclusive: for any T, copy<T> will refer to exactly one of the template functions. You don't need the return type in the mangled name for that. But I posted a (silly) example in my answer where two valid template function instantiations have the same template arguments and parameter types. Can you perhaps come up with a realistic example where that might be useful? I'm having trouble coming up with anything. – user743382 May 5 '15 at 16:16
  • @hvd Ahh, I see what you mean. I.e. the template arguments already uniquely name one specialization. I'll pick another example. – Columbo May 5 '15 at 16:25
8

Template functions may be overloaded by return type alone, unlike regular functions.

template <typename T> int f() { return 1; }
template <typename T> long f() { return 2; }

int main() {
  int (&f1) () = f<void>;
  long (&f2) () = f<void>;
  return f1() == f2();
}

Here, assuming a non-optimising compiler, the generated assembly will contain two functions f<void>(), but they can't share the same mangled name, or there would be no way for the generated assembly for main to specify which of the instantiations it refers to.

Typically, if you have an overloaded template function, only one of the definitions will be used for a particular template argument, so this is uncommon, but in the comments on Columbo's answer, dyp came up with the basic idea for how this might actually be useful. In Can addressof() be implemented as constexpr function?, I came up with

template <bool>
struct addressof_impl;

template <>
struct addressof_impl<false> {
  template <typename T>
  static constexpr T *impl(T &t) {
    return &t;
  }
};

template <>
struct addressof_impl<true> {
  template <typename T>
  static /* not constexpr */ T *impl(T &t) {
    return reinterpret_cast<T *>(&const_cast<char &>(reinterpret_cast<const volatile char &>(t)));
  }
};

template <typename T>
constexpr T *addressof(T &t)
{
  return addressof_impl<has_overloaded_addressof_operator<T>::value>::template impl<T>(t);
}

but this is actually an ODR violation if the same instantiation addressof<X> is used in multiple translation units, some where X is incomplete, and some where X is complete and has an overloaded & operator. This can be re-worked by performing the logic inside addressof directly, using regular overloaded functions.

template <typename T>
std::enable_if_t<has_overloaded_addressof_operator<T>::value, T *>
addressof(T &t)
{
  return reinterpret_cast<T *>(&const_cast<char &>(reinterpret_cast<const volatile char &>(t)));
}

template <typename T>
constexpr
std::enable_if_t<!has_overloaded_addressof_operator<T>::value, T *>
addressof(T &t)
{
  return &t;
}

(has_overloaded_addressof_operator would need to be inlined too, for the same reason.)

This way, the problem is avoided: when X is incomplete, then addressof<X> refers to a different function than when X is complete.

| improve this answer | |
  • But with your changes, a template-id with addressof always refers to one specialization uniquely, so this doesn't necessitate a mangling of return types. – Columbo May 5 '15 at 17:01
  • @Columbo addressof<X> might refer to the first definition in one translation unit, but to the second definition in another translation unit, for the same X. When those translation units can be linked together into a single program, their mangled names need to be different. – user743382 May 5 '15 at 17:02
  • @Columbo I don't see how, can you elaborate? 14.6.4.2 is about what happens if there are other definitions of addressof in other translation units, but there are no other definitions of addressof in other translation units. – user743382 May 5 '15 at 17:13
  • So your template can basically test whether a class type is complete or not. However, IIRC there has been a lot of discussion about whether such a template is technically possible (across multiple TUs), and the consensus was that its application is ill-formed. – Columbo May 5 '15 at 17:17
  • That deleted comment was referring to a template in which you use addressof. However, I was unsure whether it was applying, and in hindsight, it does not (the idea was that the definition of addressof in the second TU would be selected, because it would not SFINAE out since X is defined in that TU). This still looks uncanny, though. – Columbo May 5 '15 at 17:18

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