-2

I don't see why this won't compile when the syntax is correct:

int arrows[1] = {23};
    for(arrows[1]; arrows[1] < 300; arrows[1]++)
    {
      cout << arrows[1];
    }

Errors:

error: expected unqualified-id before 'for' !!

error: 'arrows' does not name a type !!

error: 'arrows' does not name a type

I am using this online compiler (x86 GCC 4.9.2).

8
  • 3
    ...did you put this in a function (e.g. main)? Did you consider that [1] is not a valid index for a 1-element array (which can only have [0] as a valid index)? – nneonneo May 5 '15 at 19:27
  • No, in C++ you start at 1 always in an array or it gives you errors. – Margaret Rosa May 5 '15 at 19:29
  • 3
    hi @MargaretRosa i think you are confusing some other language with c++. in c++ an array starts with an index of 0. they are zero based. Lua arrays (tables in fact) start with 1, for example. – sceiler May 5 '15 at 19:32
  • 3
    You're confusing the array size with the array index... – nneonneo May 5 '15 at 19:56
  • 3
    I literally have no idea why you're arguing here. Your current code is simply wrong, it accesses the second array element which does not exist. – nneonneo May 5 '15 at 20:12
2

I think the interactive compiler is broken. It even fails on:

for(;;) {
}

EDIT: I was wrong ... you can't just put code in there, adding a main function worked.

#include <iostream>    
int main( int argc, const char* argv[] )
{
    int arrows[1] = {23};
    for(arrows[1]; arrows[1] < 300; arrows[1]++)
    {
        std::cout << arrows[1];
    }
}
2
  • Yep, that was the problem! I thought it didn't need a main since it's an interactive compiler with direct ASM 1:1 correspondence. Thanks. – Margaret Rosa May 5 '15 at 20:03
  • 1
    This exhibits undefined behaviour because accessing and setting arrows[1] goes off the end of the one-element array. – nneonneo May 5 '15 at 20:23
3

When declaring the array you specify its size, that's why in your case 1 is correct, if you want an array of size 1.

When accessing array elements you need to use a 0-based index. So to access the first element of an array you would use 0.

Your code would then look like this

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    int arrows[1] = {23};

    for(arrows[0]; arrows[0] < 300; arrows[0]++)
    {
        std::cout << arrows[0];
    }

    return 0;
}
3
  • You have to put the code inside a function and include the right namespace if you want to use cout. See my edited answer. – Ma3x May 5 '15 at 20:05
  • I did and it works, but I don't need to change the initializers to 0; they still work in the for-loop with 1s. – Margaret Rosa May 5 '15 at 20:08
  • 3
    They do, but if you don't use 0 you are not incrementing your array value (23). Instead you are incrementing some random value that happens to be in the next space in memory (which might even result in an access violation). There is a difference between array size and array index. – Ma3x May 5 '15 at 20:11
0

I believe learning with this online compiler is not the right way...

This code works under a "normal" dev environment.

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;


int main()
{
    int arrows[1] = { 23 }; // initialize array of size one and assign it value 23
    // sizeof(arrows)/sizeof(*arrows) calculates the length of an array
    // iterate through all elements of the array and display their values..
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(arrows) / sizeof(*arrows); i++)
    {
        cout << arrows[i];
    }
    return 0;
}
1
  • I wasn't using an iterator integer. Your example is not reflective of what I wanted. – Margaret Rosa May 5 '15 at 20:02

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