419

I want to do something like this where I can run multiple commands in order.

db:
  image: postgres
web:
  build: .
  command: python manage.py migrate
  command: python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000
  volumes:
    - .:/code
  ports:
    - "8000:8000"
  links:
    - db

11 Answers 11

735

Figured it out, use bash -c.

Example:

command: bash -c "python manage.py migrate && python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000"

Same example in multilines:

command: >
    bash -c "python manage.py migrate
    && python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000"

Or:

command: bash -c "
    python manage.py migrate
    && python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000
  "
  • 4
    @Pedram Make sure you are using an image that actually has bash installed. Some images may also require a direct path to bash e.g. /bin/bash – codemaven May 10 '16 at 20:57
  • 3
    If there is no bash installed you could try sh -c "your command" – Chaoste Oct 19 '16 at 8:12
  • Make sure you wrap your commands in quotes when passing to bash and I had to slip a "sleep 5" to ensure the db was up, but it worked for me. – traday Oct 26 '16 at 1:38
  • 56
    Alpine-based images actually seem to have no bash installed - do like @Chaoste recommends and use sh instead: [sh, -c, "cd /usr/src/app && npm start"] – Florian Loch Feb 20 '17 at 23:02
  • Can also use just ash on alpine :) – Jonathan Apr 9 '17 at 11:24
145

I run pre-startup stuff like migrations in a separate ephemeral container, like so (note, compose file has to be of version '2' type):

db:
  image: postgres
web:
  image: app
  command: python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000
  volumes:
    - .:/code
  ports:
    - "8000:8000"
  links:
    - db
  depends_on:
    - migration
migration:
  build: .
  image: app
  command: python manage.py migrate
  volumes:
    - .:/code
  links:
    - db
  depends_on:
    - db

This helps things keeping clean and separate. Two things to consider:

  1. You have to ensure the correct startup sequence (using depends_on)

  2. you want to avoid multiple builds which is achieved by tagging it the first time round using build and image; you can refer to image in other containers then

  • 2
    This seems like the best option to me, and I would like to use it. Can you elaborate on your tagging setup to avoid multiple builds? I would prefer to avoid extra steps, so if this needs some, I might go with bash -c above. – Stavros Korokithakis Apr 28 '16 at 12:21
  • 3
    In the yaml above, the build and tagging happens in the migration section. It's not really obvious at first sight, but docker-compose tags it when you specify the build AND image properties - whereby the image property specifies the tag for that build. That can then be used subsequently without triggering a new build (if you look at web, you see it has no build but only an image property). Here's some more details docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file) – Bjoern Stiel Apr 28 '16 at 12:35
  • 21
    While I like the idea of this, the problem is that depends_on only ensures they start in that order, not that they are ready in that order. wait-for-it.sh may be the solution some people need. – traday Oct 26 '16 at 1:40
  • 2
    That is absolutely correct and a bit of a shame that docker-compose doesn't support any fine grained control like waiting for a container to exit or start listening on a port. But yes, a custom script does solve this, good point! – Bjoern Stiel Oct 26 '16 at 4:22
  • This answer gives incorrect and potentially destructive information about how depends_on work. – antonagestam Aug 7 at 19:12
72

I recommend using sh as opposed to bash because it is more readily available on most unix based images (alpine, etc).

Here is an example docker-compose.yml:

version: '3'

services:
  app:
    build:
      context: .
    command: >
      sh -c "python manage.py wait_for_db &&
             python manage.py migrate &&
             python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000"

This will call the following commands in order:

  • python manage.py wait_for_db - wait for the db to be ready
  • python manage.py migrate - run any migrations
  • python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000 - start my development server
  • 1
    Personally this is my favourite, and cleanest, solution. – BugHunterUK Oct 10 '18 at 18:06
  • 1
    Mine too. As @LondonAppDev points-out, bash isn't available by default in all containers to optimize on space (e.g., most containers built on top of Alpine Linux) – ewilan Nov 20 '18 at 14:32
  • I had to escape the multiline && with a \ – Andre Van Zuydam Nov 22 '18 at 15:52
  • @AndreVanZuydam hmmm that's strange, I didn't need to do that. Did you surround with quotes? What flavour of docker are you running? – LondonAppDev Nov 22 '18 at 15:57
  • 1
    @oligofren the > is used to start a multi-line input (see stackoverflow.com/a/3790497/2220370) – LondonAppDev Mar 22 at 15:50
26

This works for me:

version: '3.1'
services:
  db:
    image: postgres
  web:
    build: .
    command:
      - /bin/bash
      - -c
      - |
        python manage.py migrate
        python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000

    volumes:
      - .:/code
    ports:
      - "8000:8000"
    links:
      - db

docker-compose tries to dereference variables before running the command, so if you want bash to handle variables you'll need to escape the dollar-signs by doubling them...

    command:
      - /bin/bash
      - -c
      - |
        var=$$(echo 'foo')
        echo $$var # prints foo

...otherwise you'll get an error:

Invalid interpolation format for "command" option in service "web":

21

You can use entrypoint here. entrypoint in docker is executed before the command while command is the default command that should be run when container starts. So most of the applications generally carry setup procedure in entrypoint file and in the last they allow command to run.

make a shell script file may be as docker-entrypoint.sh (name does not matter) with following contents in it.

#!/bin/bash
python manage.py migrate
exec "$@"

in docker-compose.yml file use it with entrypoint: /docker-entrypoint.sh and register command as command: python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000 P.S : do not forget to copy docker-entrypoint.sh along with your code.

18

Another idea:

If, as in this case, you build the container just place a startup script in it and run this with command. Or mount the startup script as volume.

  • Yes, at the end I created a run.sh script: #!/bin/bash \n python manage.py migrate \n python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8000 (ugly oneline) – fero Nov 20 '17 at 12:43
5

* UPDATE *

I figured the best way to run some commands is to write a custom Dockerfile that does everything I want before the official CMD is ran from the image.

docker-compose.yaml:

version: '3'

# Can be used as an alternative to VBox/Vagrant
services:

  mongo:
    container_name: mongo
    image: mongo
    build:
      context: .
      dockerfile: deploy/local/Dockerfile.mongo
    ports:
      - "27017:27017"
    volumes:
      - ../.data/mongodb:/data/db

Dockerfile.mongo:

FROM mongo:3.2.12

RUN mkdir -p /fixtures

COPY ./fixtures /fixtures

RUN (mongod --fork --syslog && \
     mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection clients --file /fixtures/clients.json && \
     mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection configs --file /fixtures/configs.json && \
     mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection content --file /fixtures/content.json && \
     mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection licenses --file /fixtures/licenses.json && \
     mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection lists --file /fixtures/lists.json && \
     mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection properties --file /fixtures/properties.json && \
     mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection videos --file /fixtures/videos.json)

This is probably the cleanest way to do it.

* OLD WAY *

I created a shell script with my commands. In this case I wanted to start mongod, and run mongoimport but calling mongod blocks you from running the rest.

docker-compose.yaml:

version: '3'

services:
  mongo:
    container_name: mongo
    image: mongo:3.2.12
    ports:
      - "27017:27017"
    volumes:
      - ./fixtures:/fixtures
      - ./deploy:/deploy
      - ../.data/mongodb:/data/db
    command: sh /deploy/local/start_mongod.sh

start_mongod.sh:

mongod --fork --syslog && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection clients --file /fixtures/clients.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection configs --file /fixtures/configs.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection content --file /fixtures/content.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection licenses --file /fixtures/licenses.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection lists --file /fixtures/lists.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection properties --file /fixtures/properties.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection videos --file /fixtures/videos.json && \
pkill -f mongod && \
sleep 2 && \
mongod

So this forks mongo, does monogimport and then kills the forked mongo which is detached, and starts it up again without detaching. Not sure if there is a way to attach to a forked process but this does work.

NOTE: If you strictly want to load some initial db data this is the way to do it:

mongo_import.sh

#!/bin/bash
# Import from fixtures

# Used in build and docker-compose mongo (different dirs)
DIRECTORY=../deploy/local/mongo_fixtures
if [[ -d "/fixtures" ]]; then
    DIRECTORY=/fixtures
fi
echo ${DIRECTORY}

mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection clients --file ${DIRECTORY}/clients.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection configs --file ${DIRECTORY}/configs.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection content --file ${DIRECTORY}/content.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection licenses --file ${DIRECTORY}/licenses.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection lists --file ${DIRECTORY}/lists.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection properties --file ${DIRECTORY}/properties.json && \
mongoimport --db wcm-local --collection videos --file ${DIRECTORY}/videos.json

mongo_fixtures/*.json files were created via mongoexport command.

docker-compose.yaml

version: '3'

services:
  mongo:
    container_name: mongo
    image: mongo:3.2.12
    ports:
      - "27017:27017"
    volumes:
      - mongo-data:/data/db:cached
      - ./deploy/local/mongo_fixtures:/fixtures
      - ./deploy/local/mongo_import.sh:/docker-entrypoint-initdb.d/mongo_import.sh


volumes:
  mongo-data:
    driver: local
4

If you need to run more than one daemon process, there's a suggestion in the Docker documentation to use Supervisord in an un-detached mode so all the sub-daemons will output to the stdout.

From another SO question, I discovered you can redirect the child processes output to the stdout. That way you can see all the output!

  • Looking at this again, this answer seems more suited for running multiple commands in parallel instead of serially. – Tim Tisdall Aug 13 '18 at 12:48
1

Use a tool such as wait-for-it or dockerize. These are small wrapper scripts which you can include in your application’s image. Or write your own wrapper script to perform a more application-specific commands. according to: https://docs.docker.com/compose/startup-order/

0

I ran into this while trying to get my jenkins container set up to build docker containers as the jenkins user.

I needed to touch the docker.sock file in the Dockerfile as i link it later on in the docker-compose file. Unless i touch'ed it first, it didn't yet exist. This worked for me.

Dockerfile:

USER root
RUN apt-get update && \
apt-get -y install apt-transport-https \
ca-certificates \
curl \
software-properties-common && \
curl -fsSL https://download.docker.com/linux/$(. /etc/os-release; 
echo "$ID")/gpg > /tmp/dkey; apt-key add /tmp/dkey && \
add-apt-repository \
"deb [arch=amd64] https://download.docker.com/linux/$(. /etc/os-release; echo "$ID") \
$(lsb_release -cs) \
stable" && \
apt-get update && \
apt-get -y install docker-ce
RUN groupmod -g 492 docker && \
usermod -aG docker jenkins  && \
touch /var/run/docker.sock && \
chmod 777 /var/run/docker.sock

USER Jenkins

docker-compose.yml:

version: '3.3'
services:
jenkins_pipeline:
    build: .
    ports:
      - "8083:8083"
      - "50083:50080"
    volumes:
        - /root/pipeline/jenkins/mount_point_home:/var/jenkins_home
        - /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock
  • This seems like the answer to different question. – kenorb Mar 27 at 14:34
-7

try using ";" to separate the commands if you are in verions two e.g.

command: "sleep 20; echo 'a'"

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