24

I'm in a github local clone. Below is the list of branches:

$ git branch -a
* master
  online-demo
  remotes/origin/HEAD -> origin/master
  remotes/origin/develop
  remotes/origin/gh-pages
  remotes/origin/master
  remotes/origin/online-demo
  remotes/pateketrueke/develop
  remotes/pateketrueke/gh-pages
  remotes/pateketrueke/master

When I try to checkout a remote branch, I get an error:

$ git checkout develop
error: pathspec 'develop' did not match any file(s) known to git.

I can't figure out where does that come from. I guess I've been doing such checkouts for ages. Maybe I'm missing something. Anyway, I did git fetch, git fetch origin and git pull because I'm running out of ideas and there's still the same error.

4 Answers 4

51

You don't have any local branch called develop. When doing git checkout develop and no local branches are found, git will understand that you want to make a new local branch called develop, based on a develop branch in a remote repo, if any exists. In your case, you have 2 such branches origin/develop and pateketrueke/develop, so there is an ambiguity.

You can be more explicit about it by using the following form:

git branch develop origin/develop
git checkout develop

or

git branch develop pateketrueke/develop
git checkout develop

depending on what you want.


These can be abbreviated as:

git checkout -b develop origin/develop

or

git checkout -b develop pateketrueke/develop
2
  • 3
    yep, you're right. The key here is disambiguity. The git error is not very descriptive in this case...
    – ducin
    May 5, 2015 at 22:57
  • Yep, I agree that the error is misleading. I assume git does argument resolution with a certain precedence. Here, it did not find a branch so it's assuming HEAD and treating the develop argument as a path. The checkout command with a path (say, a filename) allows to put in your working tree a file from a particular sha1, refname or whatever. In this case it also fails because it doesn't find any file named develop in the tree pointed by HEAD May 5, 2015 at 23:34
8

git checkout -b "name of branch"

git pull origin "name of branch"

2

You can try checking out the full SHA commit

1

Try below commands in sequence:

git fetch
git checkout "your_branch_name"

How it works:

If your branch is new in git, fetch command fetch the names and later your can use git checkout command to checkout the branch.

To view all the branches you can use

git branch -a

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.