20

Such as:

str = 'sdf344asfasf天地方益3権sdfsdf'

Add () to Chinese and Japanese Characters:

strAfterConvert = 'sdfasfasf(天地方益)3(権)sdfsdf'
9
  • Is this Python 2 or 3?
    – Martijn Pieters
    May 6 '15 at 7:10
  • The version of python is Python2
    – Sam
    May 6 '15 at 7:24
  • Since this is rather broad and I don't want to look up the ranges: you'd decode from UTF-8 to get unicode objects, then use a regex to detect specific ranges of Unicode codepoints. What those ranges are for Chinese and Japanese is an exercise in research into the Unicode standard.
    – Martijn Pieters
    May 6 '15 at 7:28
  • Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/1366068/…
    – EdChum
    May 6 '15 at 7:47
  • From the link I posted above you could iterate over the characters and test the value of ord against the various CJK ranges for Chinese chracters
    – EdChum
    May 6 '15 at 7:51
26

As a start, you can check if the character is in one of the following unicode blocks:


After that, all you need to do is iterate through the string, checking if the char is Chinese, Japanese or Korean (CJK) and append accordingly:

# -*- coding:utf-8 -*-
ranges = [
  {"from": ord(u"\u3300"), "to": ord(u"\u33ff")},         # compatibility ideographs
  {"from": ord(u"\ufe30"), "to": ord(u"\ufe4f")},         # compatibility ideographs
  {"from": ord(u"\uf900"), "to": ord(u"\ufaff")},         # compatibility ideographs
  {"from": ord(u"\U0002F800"), "to": ord(u"\U0002fa1f")}, # compatibility ideographs
  {'from': ord(u'\u3040'), 'to': ord(u'\u309f')},         # Japanese Hiragana
  {"from": ord(u"\u30a0"), "to": ord(u"\u30ff")},         # Japanese Katakana
  {"from": ord(u"\u2e80"), "to": ord(u"\u2eff")},         # cjk radicals supplement
  {"from": ord(u"\u4e00"), "to": ord(u"\u9fff")},
  {"from": ord(u"\u3400"), "to": ord(u"\u4dbf")},
  {"from": ord(u"\U00020000"), "to": ord(u"\U0002a6df")},
  {"from": ord(u"\U0002a700"), "to": ord(u"\U0002b73f")},
  {"from": ord(u"\U0002b740"), "to": ord(u"\U0002b81f")},
  {"from": ord(u"\U0002b820"), "to": ord(u"\U0002ceaf")}  # included as of Unicode 8.0
]

def is_cjk(char):
  return any([range["from"] <= ord(char) <= range["to"] for range in ranges])

def cjk_substrings(string):
  i = 0
  while i<len(string):
    if is_cjk(string[i]):
      start = i
      while is_cjk(string[i]): i += 1
      yield string[start:i]
    i += 1

string = "sdf344asfasf天地方益3権sdfsdf".decode("utf-8")
for sub in cjk_substrings(string):
  string = string.replace(sub, "(" + sub + ")")
print string

The above prints

sdf344asfasf(天地方益)3(権)sdfsdf

To be future-proof, you might want to keep a lookout for CJK Unified Ideographs Extension E. It will ship with Unicode 8.0, which is scheduled for release in June 2015. I've added it to the ranges, but you shouldn't include it until Unicode 8.0 is released.

[EDIT]

Added CJK compatibility ideographs, Japanese Kana and CJK radicals.

13
  • 1
    That doesn't cover all the various ranges: stackoverflow.com/questions/1366068/…
    – EdChum
    May 6 '15 at 7:52
  • 1
    @EdChum I've updated my answer to include the available unicode ranges.
    – EvenLisle
    May 6 '15 at 8:39
  • Those ranges will miss Japanese Kana characters and a bunch of CJK symbols, strokes, radicals, compatibility characters, and phonetic extensions. It would be easier, and more reliable, to check the Unicode "Script" property.
    – 一二三
    May 6 '15 at 8:59
  • 1
    I got a 'TypeError: ord() expected a character, but string of length 2 found' for {"from": ord(u"\U0002a700"), "to": ord(u"\U0002b73f")} and all the other rows containing "\U". Can you please take a look? Thanks.
    – J Freebird
    Aug 19 '15 at 0:46
  • 1
    The range for hiragana is missing. Please add {'from': ord(u'\u3040'), 'to': ord(u'\u309f')}.
    – lacton
    Jul 17 '17 at 12:36
14

You can do the edit using the regex package, which supports checking the Unicode "Script" property of each character and is a drop-in replacement for the re package:

import regex as re

pattern = re.compile(r'([\p{IsHan}\p{IsBopo}\p{IsHira}\p{IsKatakana}]+)', re.UNICODE)

input = u'sdf344asfasf天地方益3権sdfsdf'
output = pattern.sub(r'(\1)', input)
print output  # Prints: sdf344asfasf(天地方益)3(権)sdfsdf

You should adjust the \p{Is...} sequences with the character scripts/blocks that you consider to be "Chinese or Japanese".

1
  • Can regex tell which type it belongs to?
    – natsuapo
    May 19 '17 at 9:11
9

From one of the bleeding edge branch of NLTK inspired by the Moses Machine Translation Toolkit:

def is_cjk(character):
    """"
    Checks whether character is CJK.

        >>> is_cjk(u'\u33fe')
        True
        >>> is_cjk(u'\uFE5F')
        False

    :param character: The character that needs to be checked.
    :type character: char
    :return: bool
    """
    return any([start <= ord(character) <= end for start, end in 
                [(4352, 4607), (11904, 42191), (43072, 43135), (44032, 55215), 
                 (63744, 64255), (65072, 65103), (65381, 65500), 
                 (131072, 196607)]
                ])

For the specifics of the ord() numbers:

class CJKChars(object):
    """
    An object that enumerates the code points of the CJK characters as listed on
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_Multilingual_Plane#Basic_Multilingual_Plane

    This is a Python port of the CJK code point enumerations of Moses tokenizer:
    https://github.com/moses-smt/mosesdecoder/blob/master/scripts/tokenizer/detokenizer.perl#L309
    """
    # Hangul Jamo (1100–11FF)
    Hangul_Jamo = (4352, 4607) # (ord(u"\u1100"), ord(u"\u11ff"))

    # CJK Radicals Supplement (2E80–2EFF)
    # Kangxi Radicals (2F00–2FDF)
    # Ideographic Description Characters (2FF0–2FFF)
    # CJK Symbols and Punctuation (3000–303F)
    # Hiragana (3040–309F)
    # Katakana (30A0–30FF)
    # Bopomofo (3100–312F)
    # Hangul Compatibility Jamo (3130–318F)
    # Kanbun (3190–319F)
    # Bopomofo Extended (31A0–31BF)
    # CJK Strokes (31C0–31EF)
    # Katakana Phonetic Extensions (31F0–31FF)
    # Enclosed CJK Letters and Months (3200–32FF)
    # CJK Compatibility (3300–33FF)
    # CJK Unified Ideographs Extension A (3400–4DBF)
    # Yijing Hexagram Symbols (4DC0–4DFF)
    # CJK Unified Ideographs (4E00–9FFF)
    # Yi Syllables (A000–A48F)
    # Yi Radicals (A490–A4CF)
    CJK_Radicals = (11904, 42191) # (ord(u"\u2e80"), ord(u"\ua4cf"))

    # Phags-pa (A840–A87F)
    Phags_Pa = (43072, 43135) # (ord(u"\ua840"), ord(u"\ua87f"))

    # Hangul Syllables (AC00–D7AF)
    Hangul_Syllables = (44032, 55215) # (ord(u"\uAC00"), ord(u"\uD7AF"))

    # CJK Compatibility Ideographs (F900–FAFF)
    CJK_Compatibility_Ideographs = (63744, 64255) # (ord(u"\uF900"), ord(u"\uFAFF"))

    # CJK Compatibility Forms (FE30–FE4F)
    CJK_Compatibility_Forms = (65072, 65103) # (ord(u"\uFE30"), ord(u"\uFE4F"))

    # Range U+FF65–FFDC encodes halfwidth forms, of Katakana and Hangul characters
    Katakana_Hangul_Halfwidth = (65381, 65500) # (ord(u"\uFF65"), ord(u"\uFFDC"))

    # Supplementary Ideographic Plane 20000–2FFFF
    Supplementary_Ideographic_Plane = (131072, 196607) # (ord(u"\U00020000"), ord(u"\U0002FFFF"))

    ranges = [Hangul_Jamo, CJK_Radicals, Phags_Pa, Hangul_Syllables, 
              CJK_Compatibility_Ideographs, CJK_Compatibility_Forms, 
              Katakana_Hangul_Halfwidth, Supplementary_Ideographic_Plane]

Combining the is_cjk() in this answer and @EvenLisle substring answer

>>> from nltk.tokenize.util import is_cjk
>>> text = u'sdf344asfasf天地方益3権sdfsdf'
>>> [1 if is_cjk(ch) else 0 for ch in text]
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
>>> def cjk_substrings(string):
...     i = 0
...     while i<len(string):
...         if is_cjk(string[i]):
...             start = i
...             while is_cjk(string[i]): i += 1
...             yield string[start:i]
...         i += 1
... 
>>> string = "sdf344asfasf天地方益3権sdfsdf".decode("utf-8")
>>> for sub in cjk_substrings(string):
...     string = string.replace(sub, "(" + sub + ")")
... 
>>> string
u'sdf344asfasf(\u5929\u5730\u65b9\u76ca)3(\u6a29)sdfsdf'
>>> print string
sdf344asfasf(天地方益)3(権)sdfsdf
1
  • 1
    Thx! It works, where @EvenLisle's answer failed: テンポラリ. Minor quibble: type character: char in the docstring - it's str actually (there's no char type in Python)
    – z33k
    May 7 '19 at 9:52
3

If you can't use regex module that provides access to IsKatakana, IsHan properties as shown in @一二三's answer; you could use character ranges from @EvenLisle's answer with stdlib's re module:

>>> import re
>>> print(re.sub(u"([\u3300-\u33ff\ufe30-\ufe4f\uf900-\ufaff\U0002f800-\U0002fa1f\u30a0-\u30ff\u2e80-\u2eff\u4e00-\u9fff\u3400-\u4dbf\U00020000-\U0002a6df\U0002a700-\U0002b73f\U0002b740-\U0002b81f\U0002b820-\U0002ceaf]+)", r"(\1)", u'sdf344asfasf天地方益3権sdfsdf'))
sdf344asfasf(天地方益)3(権)sdfsdf

Beware of known issues.

You could also check Unicode category:

>>> import unicodedata
>>> unicodedata.category(u'天')
'Lo'
>>> unicodedata.category(u's')
'Ll'

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