21

Say I have the following function:

const std::string& Cat::getKittenName() const
{
  Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
  return kitty->getName();
}

Where Kitten::getName returns a const std::string& how do I best handle the case where kitty is a nullptr? I could return std::string("") but then I am returning a reference to a temporary and practically guaranteeing undefined behaviour. I could change the getKittenName function to return a std::string to get around this but then I am introducing a redundant copy for all the cases where kitty is available. Right now I feel the best option is:

const std::string& Cat::getKittenName() const
{
  Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
  if (kitty)
  {
    return kitty->getName();
  }
  static std::string empty("");
  return empty;
}

The only issue might be if 'magic statics' aren't available. Is there any problem with this solution or is there a better way to do it?

7
  • 2
    The cleanest solution is not to worry about "redundant" copies until you know they're significant.
    – molbdnilo
    May 6, 2015 at 9:19
  • 6
    Throw an exception? It's an expected property of references that they're never null.
    – alcedine
    May 6, 2015 at 9:19
  • 1
    @AlexFarber There's a copy, whereas when returning a reference there isn't one. Also, the semantics are different. So simply returning by value might not be the right thing to do. May 6, 2015 at 9:21
  • 2
    @molbdnilo This particular example might not make my application slow by itself but string copying is a real performance problem in C++. If I didn't care at least a little about performance then why even use C++?
    – sjdowling
    May 6, 2015 at 9:23
  • 3
    if string sizes are small (20 chars or so) it might surprise you to learn that copies are often as quick or quicker than references. The reason to choose c++(11) is not performance, it's safety. Write safe code first, then make it quick if it's too slow (it won't be). Don't try to write quick code - you'll end up with code that doesn't always work. May 6, 2015 at 9:48

4 Answers 4

27

You have several options, really.

  • The simplest one would be to return std::string, but you mentioned you do not want that for performance reasons. I'd say you should first profile to make sure it will present a noticeable performance problem, because all other solutions will make the code more complicated and hence at least a little bit harder to maintain. But let's say it does appear to be significant.

  • If you're worried about thread-safe function-scope statics not being implemented, you can create the fallback value as a static member of Cat:

    class Cat {
      static const std::string missingKittenName;
    
    public:
      const std::string& Cat::getKittenName() const
      {
        Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
        if (kitty)
          return kitty->getName();
        else
          return missingKittenName;
      }
    };
    
  • Since Kitten::getName() apparently returns a reference (otherwise you wouldn't be worried about copies), you could also return a pointer:

    const std::string* Cat::getKittenName() const
    {
      Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
      if (kitty)
        return &kitty->getName();
      else
        return nullptr;
    }
    
  • You could return an optional reference to a string:

    boost::optional<const std::string&> Cat::getKittenName() const
    {
      Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
      if (kitty)
        return kitty->getName();
      else
        return boost::none;
    }
    

    Since C++17, optional is part of the standard library as std::optional, so there is no longer need to fall back on Boost.

  • If the fact that a name is missing is an exception circumstance (an error), you could throw an exception:

    const std::string& Cat::getKittenName() const
    {
      Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
      if (kitty)
        return kitty->getName();
      else
        throw std::invalid_argument("Missing kitten");
    }
    
8
  • I would argue (quite strongly) that returning a pointer is utterly evil. Returning an optional is better, but now requires the caller to distinguish between a missing name and a blank one. This makes his predicates more [un-necessarily?] complex. Returning an empty const static string (reference) is surely the safest approach with least opportunity for bugs at the call site. May 6, 2015 at 9:44
  • @RichardHodges I wouldn't go down the pointer route either, but I wanted to mention it out of a sense of completeness. The OP knows their requirements best and can decide the best fit for them. May 6, 2015 at 9:46
  • 2
    Maybe it's the C programmer still left in me, but I quite like returning a const pointer in this case (I'm also a fan of optional, don't get me wrong..) but the idea of an optional const reference just doesn't sit well with me...
    – Nim
    May 6, 2015 at 9:52
  • 1
    @RichardHodges, correct interfaces are well documented; it's a reasonable expectation that you check return values before using them.. ;)
    – Nim
    May 6, 2015 at 14:56
  • 8
    It's illegal to put references in std::optional in C++17.
    – Jyaif
    Feb 21, 2020 at 7:45
6

Return a reference to a const static std::string.

Reasons:

  • 'magic statics' are not magic, they are part of the c++ standard.
  • statics are constructed the first time the code flows over them (i.e. once ever)
  • as of c++11 static construction is thread safe.
  • static objects are correctly deallocated in the correct order at the end of the program
  • the performance penalty of one redundant static object is utterly negligible, and a great deal less than the cost of testing returned pointers for null.

If you're multi-threaded on a pre-c++11 compiler, then you will need to write a thread-safe singleton to manufacture the default string, or define it at file scope.

c++11:

const std::string& Cat::getKittenName() const
{
  static const std::string noname { /* empty string */ };
  Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
  if (kitty)
  {
    return kitty->getName();
  }
  return noname;
}

c++03:

namespace {
    const std::string noname;
}

const std::string& Cat::getKittenName() const
{
  Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
  if (kitty)
  {
    return kitty->getName();
  }
  return noname;
}
4
  • Can you elaborate on how this differs from the code the OP has, and how it deals with the unavailability of magic statics which the OP cites as a problem? May 6, 2015 at 9:27
  • 1
    I'm not sure how this is an improvement. In fact it seems worse because noname is constructed even if it never needs to be as well as allocating redundant heap memory.
    – sjdowling
    May 6, 2015 at 9:28
  • a) it's const, b) statics aren't magic - they are a language feature that can be expected to be there. May 6, 2015 at 9:28
  • 1
    @RichardHodges "magic statics" refers to their thread-safety, which not all compilers implement. May 6, 2015 at 9:29
0

Return a boolean indicating success/failure and pass the output in by pointer.

Here's an example:

bool Cat::getKittenName(std::string *name) const {
  Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
  if (kitty) {
    *name = kitty->getName();
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}

You would use this as follows:

std::string name;
if(mycat.getKittenName(&name)) {
   // name is populated and is valid
}

This requires that the class being passed in by pointer has a valid copy constructor and copy assignment operator.

There's a few reasons I prefer doing it this way:

  1. Returning a pointer is confusing and it's not clear to the caller what to do with the pointer.

For example the example listed above:

const std::string* Cat::getKittenName() const
{
  Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
  if (kitty)
    return &kitty->getName();
  else
    return nullptr;
}

would be called like this:

const std::string *name = mykitty.getKittenName();

o.k... now what? I can't change the value of name using this pointer, but can I change what the pointer is pointing to? Should I be wrapping this in a

std::unique_ptr<const std::string>

?? In general returning pointers is very C-esque and is a great source of memory leaks and bugs in addition to be confusing.

  1. Throwing an exception

This example:

const std::string& Cat::getKittenName() const
{
  Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
  if (kitty)
    return kitty->getName();
  else
    throw std::invalid_argument("Missing kitten");
}

I'm not a fan of because it encourages throwing exceptions for non-exceptional behavior. For instance if you wrote a method called 'find()' on a set of kittens. It's not an 'exception' to not find a kitten by a particular name. The STL uses various mechanisms like std::end and std::pair to avoid throwing exceptions for non exceptional behavior.

The other problem that this generates is that, unlike Java, it's not exactly clear where exceptions are being thrown in the code and transitive calls can not clean up properly if you didn't realize that something throws. This is particularly nefarious in libraries that throw exceptions.

I prefer the style of:

retval method(const input&, pointer *output) { }

because it's clear how inputs and outputs are placed on the method. This also avoids having to return funky constructs like std::pair which doesn't scale.

1
  • Your preferred style is very common in industrial code, but not modern. You need to construct the output pointer, and therefore check the methods signature to see what's the type of that pointer. It slows implementation speed down when compared to auto.
    – mfnx
    Mar 24, 2018 at 1:01
0

Probably the most correct way to do it is like this:

#include <optional>
#include <functional>

std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<const std::string>> Cat::getKittenName() const
{
  Kitten* kitty = getKitty();
  if (kitty)
  {
    return kitty->getName();
  }
  return std::nullopt;
}

Here's a complete demonstration:

#include <optional>
#include <functional>

std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<const int>> foo() {
    static int a = 5;
    if (a > 5) {
        return a;
    }
    return std::nullopt;
}

int bar() {
    auto x = foo();
    if (x.has_value()) {
        return *x;
    }
    return 0;
}

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