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Is there a way to specify the edge for matplotlib's Rectangle patch so that the border is outside the domain specified? In photoshop, this is would be called "stroke position", for example. Allow me to illustrate with an example:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.patches import Rectangle


# Here's my "image"
X = np.arange(16).reshape(4,4)

# Suppose I want to highlight some feature in the middle boxes.
fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.imshow(X, cmap=plt.cm.gray, interpolation='nearest')
ax.add_patch( Rectangle((0.5, 0.5), 2, 2, fc='none', ec='r') )
plt.show()

This yields the following:

enter image description here

However, if modified the above as follows

ax.add_patch( Rectangle((0.5, 0.5), 2, 2, fc='none', ec='r', lw=10) )

I obtain the figure:

enter image description here

As you can see, the edge is center-positioned along the border of the domain of the Rectangle object, and so bleeds into this domain. Is it possible to force the edge border to be strictly outside the Rectangle's domain?

  • I think it's slightly weirder that the border line bleeds out of the Rectangle's domain, even. It looks to me as though the solution either way is to translate the points that linewidth is specified in into the coordinates the Rectangle is being defined with (usually data coordinates, can be any Transform) and then adjust the Rectangle's x,y. Which is clearly a hassle. Maybe there's something in patheffects. – cphlewis May 6 '15 at 17:15
  • So, basically draw a bigger rectangle, and adjust (x,y) appropriately? I thought about something along those lines, but linewidth seems to be based on the current figure size, not pixels. I can't seem to find in the documentation how this is specified: it only talks about "float value in points": matplotlib.org/api/… – Matt Hancock May 6 '15 at 17:24
  • (rummaged in patheffects for a bit which was informative about what Strokes can do: offsets but not, AFAICT, the kind of expansion and trapping that printing programs can do. I think adjusting the x,y is going to be necessary.) – cphlewis May 6 '15 at 17:27
  • There's a points_to_pixels method on some of the renderers, but I can't remember how you get from pixels to data-units except when printing. – cphlewis May 6 '15 at 17:34
  • This may be a limitation of the path stroking logic. A way to get what you want may be to get what you want in a very round about way by making a filled rectangle and then clipping it with an inverted clip path. – tacaswell May 7 '15 at 1:47
3

You may use an AnnotationBbox inside of which an AuxTransformBox is placed. This AuxTransformBox would contain a proxy rectangle of the desired size. This can be made invisible (e.g. fc='none', ec='none'). Its only function is to scale the AuxTransformBox to the right size. Now the AnnotationBbox can be given a border of some large linewidth. If it is sitting tight against the AuxTransformBox the border will only start where the AuxTransformBox ends. To let the border fit tightly, one can set the padding pad to half the linewidth of the border. Since padding is given in units of fontsize, it is the fontsize which needs to be set to the linewidth and the padding to 0.5, pad=0.5,fontsize=linewidth. Note that it appears that a slightly larger padding of 0.52 looks nicer on the plot; in any case this can be adjusted to one's liking.

Sounds complicated, but the code is copy and pastable to be used anywhere a Rectangle would usually be used.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.patches import Rectangle
from matplotlib.offsetbox import AnnotationBbox, AuxTransformBox


# Here's my "image"
X = np.arange(16).reshape(4,4)

# Suppose I want to highlight some feature in the middle boxes.
fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.imshow(X, cmap=plt.cm.gray, interpolation='nearest', aspect="auto")

linewidth=14
xy, w, h = (0.5, 0.5), 2, 2
r = Rectangle(xy, w, h, fc='none', ec='gold', lw=1)

offsetbox = AuxTransformBox(ax.transData)
offsetbox.add_artist(r)
ab = AnnotationBbox(offsetbox, (xy[0]+w/2.,xy[1]+w/2.),
                    boxcoords="data", pad=0.52,fontsize=linewidth,
                    bboxprops=dict(facecolor = "none", edgecolor='r', 
                              lw = linewidth))
ax.add_artist(ab)


plt.show()

enter image description here

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