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How safe is it to create an instance of a class in the metaclass constructors (__new__ and __init__)? I'm specifically interested for Python 2.7, but what Python 3 does is also welcome.

The Python data model docs sound like they're written for the normal class instance creation case, and I'm not really sure how the rules might be subtly different when its occurring in a metaclass.

For example, lets say I have code like this:

class Meta(type):
  NEWED = []
  INITED_BEFORE = []
  INITED_AFTER = []
  def __new__(meta, name, bases, dict):
    cls = super(Meta, meta).__new__(meta, name, bases, dict)
    instance = cls()
    Meta.NEWED.append(instance)
    return cls

  def __init__(cls, name, bases, dict):
    Meta.INITED_BEFORE.append(cls())
    super(Meta, cls).__init__(name, bases, dict)
    Meta.INITED_AFTER.append(cls())

class Foo(object):
  __metaclass__ = Meta

At which points, if any, is it safe to construct an instance of Foo while the metaclass is constructing it, and what sort of caveats are there?

One suspicion I have is that, if Foo inherited other classes, or was subclassed, and those other classes had their own metaclass, then calling cls() in any of the metaclass methods would be calling it on a not-yet-finished class object. Is that true?

  • I don't think it's really documented in Python 2.x, so the only way to answer this is to examine the implementation for every implementation you care about, or to just write the test cases you care about and test them with every implementation you care about. – abarnert May 6 '15 at 18:04
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    I'll have to double-check, but I'm pretty sure that instance = cls() in your __new__ method is going to create an infinite loop, as calling cls() will then call __new__ for that new instance you're trying to create. – rmunn May 6 '15 at 18:04
  • The metaclass system in Python 3.x has been thoroughly worked through and documented, but that doesn't do you any good if you want to stick with 2.7, of course. – abarnert May 6 '15 at 18:05
  • P.S. I assume this is Python 2.x, since you're inheriting from object in class Foo. Also, I think your Meta.INITED_BEFORE = cls() line is not quite right; did you mean Meta.INITED_BEFORE.append(cls())? (Same for the INITED_AFTER line as well.) – rmunn May 6 '15 at 18:07
  • @rmunn calling cls() will not call the __new__ for the metaclass. That is only called at class creation time. – Iguananaut May 6 '15 at 18:09
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One suspicion I have is that, if Foo inherited other classes, or was subclassed, and those other classes had their own metaclass, then calling cls() in any of the metaclass methods would be calling it on a not-yet-finished class object. Is that true?

That is true, to the extent that in the metaclass's __new__, its __init__ won't have been called yet. Your metaclass has an __init__, as might any subclass, so you should make sure that gets called first. So I wouldn't try to make an instance of a class that hasn't been fully instantiated yet.

One thing you might do is manually call the metaclass's __init__ from within __new__. But you would have to set a flag or something in __init__ to make sure that the class doesn't get __init__'d twice. There might be a more clever way too that I'm not thinking of at the moment.

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