I can't understand why the 'chown' command should increase the size of my docker image?

The following Dockerfile creates an image of size 5.3MB:

FROM alpine:edge
RUN adduser example -D -h /example -s /bin/sh

This example however creates an image of size 8.7MB:

FROM alpine:edge
RUN adduser example -D -h /example -s /bin/sh && \
    chown -R example.example /lib

Why?

Note: My actual dockerfile is of course much longer than this example and therefore the increase in image size is also quite larger. That's why I even care..

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Every step in a Dockerfile generates a new intermediate image, or "layer", consisting of anything that changed on the filesystem from the previous layer. A docker image consists of a collection of layers that are applied one on top of another to create the final filesystem.

If you have:

RUN adduser example -D -h /example -s /bin/sh

Then you are probably changing nothing other than a few files in /etc (/etc/passwd, /etc/group, and their shadow equivalents).

If you have:

RUN adduser example -D -h /example -s /bin/sh && \
    chown -R example.example /lib

Then the list of things that have changed includes, recursively, everything in /lib, which is potentially larger. In fact, in my alpine:edge container, it looks like the contents of /lib is 3.4MB:

/ # du -sh /lib
3.4M    /lib

Which exactly accounts for the change in image size in your example.

UPDATE

Using your actual Dockerfile, with the npm install ... line commented out, I don't see any difference in the final image size whether or not the adduser and chown commands are run. Given:

RUN echo "http://nl.alpinelinux.org/alpine/edge/main" > /etc/apk/repositories && \
    echo "http://nl.alpinelinux.org/alpine/edge/testing" >> /etc/apk/repositories && \
    apk add -U wget iojs && \
    apk upgrade && \
    wget -q --no-check-certificate https://ghost.org/zip/ghost-0.6.0.zip -O /tmp/ghost.zip && \
    unzip -q /tmp/ghost.zip -d /ghost && \
    cd /ghost && \
#    npm install --production && \
    sed 's/127.0.0.1/0.0.0.0/' /ghost/config.example.js > /ghost/config.js && \
    sed -i 's/"iojs": "~1.2.0"/"iojs": "~1.6.4"/' package.json && \
#   adduser ghost -D -h /ghost -s /bin/sh && \
#   chown -R ghost.ghost * && \
    npm cache clean && \
    rm -rf /var/cache/apk/* /tmp/*

I get:

$ docker build -t sotest .
[...]
Successfully built 058d9f41988a
$ docker inspect -f '{{.VirtualSize}}' 058d9f41988a
31783340

Whereas given:

RUN echo "http://nl.alpinelinux.org/alpine/edge/main" > /etc/apk/repositories && \
    echo "http://nl.alpinelinux.org/alpine/edge/testing" >> /etc/apk/repositories && \
    apk add -U wget iojs && \
    apk upgrade && \
    wget -q --no-check-certificate https://ghost.org/zip/ghost-0.6.0.zip -O /tmp/ghost.zip && \
    unzip -q /tmp/ghost.zip -d /ghost && \
    cd /ghost && \
#    npm install --production && \
    sed 's/127.0.0.1/0.0.0.0/' /ghost/config.example.js > /ghost/config.js && \
    sed -i 's/"iojs": "~1.2.0"/"iojs": "~1.6.4"/' package.json && \
    adduser ghost -D -h /ghost -s /bin/sh && \
    chown -R ghost.ghost * && \
    npm cache clean && \
    rm -rf /var/cache/apk/* /tmp/*

I get:

$ docker build -t sotest .
[...]
Successfully built 696b481c5790
$ docker inspect -f '{{.VirtualSize}}' 696b481c5790
31789262

That is, the two images are approximately the same size (the difference is around 5 Kb).

I would of course expect the resulting image to be larger if the npm install command could run successfully (because that would install additional files).

  • Thanks. I follow your logic, since I change files already in the base image. But what if I downloaded a bunch of files as part of a RUN command and then did a chown on them (which is more the actual case) ? Example: getting a tar.gz file, extract it and chown recursivly, all in one layer. Why would that also add size? My actual Dockerfile: pastebin.com/raw.php?i=ZEf2NMjP (what adds size is commented out) – Fractalf May 6 '15 at 20:15
  • Well, you just added a bunch of files to the image, right? Or did I misunderstand your question? – larsks May 6 '15 at 20:16
  • Sorry for being unclear. I stripped down my Docker file for the sake of readability. Check out the pastebin actual file above. So in the example on top i did not add files, but this is what I actually do, and then I don't follow the logic, because i only edit files that I already added. Shouldn't give an extra overhead? – Fractalf May 6 '15 at 20:21
  • Where does sqlite3.tar.gz come from? I would like to build your image locally. – larsks May 6 '15 at 20:32
  • 1
    @Fractalf Based on your Dockerfile (in the pasetbin), you're putting the content of sqlite3.tar.gz in /ghost/nodes_modules/ so when you do chown, you modify these in the new layer, so they are duplicated accros 2 layers. For the 2nd "try", with the COPY you will have the sqlite3.tar.gz, before extraction, and forever as it will be on one layer (so it's useless to remove it in the RUN command). One way would be to get it from a uri (wget in the RUN command) – Vincent Demeester May 6 '15 at 21:45

Now you can inspect your image & its layers visually using ImageLayers.io to help see why the extra size is.

also, docker history shows similar stuff.

This is a known problem unfortunately: https://github.com/docker/docker/issues/5505 and https://github.com/docker/docker/issues/6119#issuecomment-70606158

You can fix this by changing the docker storage driver from aufs to devicemapper as described in https://github.com/docker/docker/issues/6119#issuecomment-268870519

Since Docker 17.09 one can use --chown flag on ADD/COPY operations in Dockerfile to change the owner in the ADD/COPY step itself rather than a separate RUN operation with chown which increases the size of the image as you have noted. It would have been good to have this as the default mode i.e. the permissions of the user copying the files are applied to the copied files. However, the Docker team did not want to break backward compatibility and hence introduced a new flag.

COPY --chown=:

The other alternatives are: 1. Change the permission in a staging folder prior to building the image.

  1. Run the container via a bootstrap script that changes the ownership.

  2. Squash the layers!

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