4

I have a table quiet like this:

CREATE TABLE myTable (
    family text,
    names text[]
)

I can search like this:

SELECT family
FROM myTable where names @> array['B0WP04'];

But I would like to do:

SELECT family
FROM myTable where names @> array['%P0%'];

Is this possible ?

3 Answers 3

5

Adding a bit on Radek's answer, I tried

select family
from myTable where 
exists (select 1 from unnest(names) as name where name like '%P0%');

and it also works. I searched in the PostgreSQL docs for the un() function, but can't find anything.

I'm not saying it doesn't do anything, but I'm just curious about what the un() function should do (and happy to have my problem solved)

2
  • 1
    as un(name) is just fancy aliasing ;). More info: "Another form of table aliasing gives temporary names to the columns of the table, as well as the table itself: FROM table_reference [AS] alias ( column1 [, column2 [, ...]] ) at postgresql.org/docs/current/static/… Jul 26, 2016 at 20:11
  • 1
    Change select 1 to select * and it does exactly what I needed.
    – barnacle.m
    Mar 25, 2019 at 22:46
4

In postgreSQL 9.3 you can:

select family
from myTable 
join lateral unnest(mytable.names) as un(name) on true
where un.name like '%P0%';

But keep in mind that it can produce duplicates so perhaphs you'd like to add distinct.

For earlier versions:

select family
from myTable where 
exists (select 1 from unnest(names) as un(name) where un.name like '%P0%');
2

You can use the parray_gin extension https://github.com/theirix/parray_gin

This extension is said to work only up to 9.2 but I just installed and tested it on 9.3 and it works well.

Here is how to install it on ubuntu-like systems :)

# install postgresql extension network client and postgresql extension build tools
sudo apt-get install python-setuptools
easy_install pgxnclient
sudo apt-get install postgresql-server-dev-9.3

# get the extension
pgxn install parray_gin

And here is my test

-- as a superuser: add the extension to the current database
CREATE EXTENSION parray_gin;

-- as a normal user
CREATE TABLE test (
  id    SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
  names TEXT []
);

INSERT INTO test (names) VALUES
  (ARRAY ['nam1', 'nam2']),
  (ARRAY ['2nam1', '2nam2']),
  (ARRAY ['Hello', 'Woooorld']),
  (ARRAY ['Woooorld', 'Hello']),
  (ARRAY [] :: TEXT []),
  (NULL),
  (ARRAY ['Hello', 'is', 'it', 'me', 'you''re', 'looking', 'for', '?']);

-- double up the rows in test table, with many rows, the index is used
INSERT INTO test (names) (SELECT names FROM test);

SELECT count(*) from test; /*
 count  
--------
 997376
(1 row)
*/

Now that we have some test data, it's magic time:

-- http://pgxn.org/dist/parray_gin/doc/parray_gin.html
CREATE INDEX names_idx ON test USING GIN (names parray_gin_ops);

--- now it's time for some tests
EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM test WHERE names @> ARRAY ['is']; /*

-- WITHOUT INDEX ON NAMES
                                                 QUERY PLAN                                                 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Seq Scan on test  (cost=0.00..25667.00 rows=1138 width=49) (actual time=0.021..508.599 rows=51200 loops=1)
   Filter: (names @> '{is}'::text[])
   Rows Removed by Filter: 946176
 Total runtime: 653.879 ms
(4 rows)

-- WITH INDEX ON NAMES
                                                         QUERY PLAN                                                         
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Bitmap Heap Scan on test  (cost=455.73..3463.37 rows=997 width=49) (actual time=14.327..240.365 rows=51200 loops=1)
   Recheck Cond: (names @> '{is}'::text[])
   ->  Bitmap Index Scan on names_idx  (cost=0.00..455.48 rows=997 width=0) (actual time=12.241..12.241 rows=51200 loops=1)
         Index Cond: (names @> '{is}'::text[])
 Total runtime: 341.750 ms
(5 rows)

*/

EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM test WHERE names @@> ARRAY ['%nam%']; /*

-- WITHOUT INDEX ON NAMES
                                                 QUERY PLAN                                                 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Seq Scan on test  (cost=0.00..23914.20 rows=997 width=49) (actual time=0.023..590.093 rows=102400 loops=1)
   Filter: (names @@> '{%nam%}'::text[])
   Rows Removed by Filter: 894976
 Total runtime: 796.636 ms
(4 rows)

-- WITH INDEX ON NAMES
                                                         QUERY PLAN                                                          
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Bitmap Heap Scan on test  (cost=159.73..3167.37 rows=997 width=49) (actual time=20.164..293.942 rows=102400 loops=1)
   Recheck Cond: (names @@> '{%nam%}'::text[])
   ->  Bitmap Index Scan on names_idx  (cost=0.00..159.48 rows=997 width=0) (actual time=18.539..18.539 rows=102400 loops=1)
         Index Cond: (names @@> '{%nam%}'::text[])
 Total runtime: 490.060 ms
(5 rows)

*/

The final performance totally depend on your data and queries but on my dummy example, this extension is very efficient cut query time in half.

1
  • This works really great! However, sometimes the query with index returns no results. Basically for a query using '%a%' which normally returns the entire table now returns 0 row since I created the index.
    – pidupuis
    May 7, 2015 at 13:30

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