1

My current project requires me to fill an array based upon some other values. I know there's the shortcut:

int arr[4][4] = { {0,0,0,0} , {0,0,0,0} , {0,0,0,0} , {0,0,0,0} };

But in this case, I need to fill the array after its declaration. I currently have my code formatted like this:

int arr[4][4];
if(someothervariable == 1){
    arr = { {1,1,1,1},
            {1,2,3,4},
            {2,,3,4,5},
            {3,4,5,6} };
}

But it won't compile. Is there a way to make use of the mentioned shortcut in my case? If not, whats the best fix available? I'd appreciate a way to set it without explicitly assigning each element? ie: arr[0][0] = ...

  • 7
    Is the extra comma there in the original? – Michael Myers Jun 9 '10 at 22:22
  • 3
    In the first case the shortcut would be int arr[4][4] = {}. What you have above is certainly a "longcut" :)) – AnT Jun 9 '10 at 22:26
  • 1
    C++1x with its unified initialization syntax to the rescue! Unfortunately, it's not yet widely available. – sbi Jun 10 '10 at 6:55
2

How about using std::copy() ?

int arr[4][4];
if(someothervariable == 1){
        const static int a2[4][4] = { {1,1,1,1},
                                      {1,2,3,4},
                                      {2,3,4,5},
                                      {3,4,5,6} };
        std::copy(&a2[0][0], &a2[0][0]+16, &arr[0][0]);
}
  • 2
    This will work in practice, but formally and pedantically speaking reinterpreting a 2D array as 1D array is illegal. More precisely, it is formally illegal to use pointer arithmetic on &a2[0][0] that steps more than 4 steps away from that pointer. Doing &a2[0][0] + 16 is undefined behavior. Again, this will normally work in practice. – AnT Jun 10 '10 at 7:18
  • Thanks for making me re-read the standard! I went by remembering the words the same array object (5.7/6) and arrays in C++ are stored row-wise (8.3.4/9), but you're right, it is legal to implement a 2D array with padding bytes between each row (just as it is legal to have &arr (before array-to-pointer conversion) != &arr[0][0]), in which case this would fail. – Cubbi Jun 10 '10 at 10:46
1

No, array initialization syntax is for array initialization. Although, you can use memset if all the values are the same byte.

The boost.assign library adds some interesting syntax for modifying/filling collections, but AFAIK it doesn't support C style arrays (only C++ and Boost containers).

1

In the current version of C++ language the only way to do it is to copy it from some original

int arr[4][4];

if (someothervariable == 1)
{
  const int SOURCE[4][4] = // make it `static` if you prefer
  { 
    {1, 1, 1, 1},
    {1, 2, 3, 4},
    {2, 3, 4, 5},
    {3, 4, 5, 6} 
  };

  assert(sizeof arr == sizeof SOURCE); // static assert is more appropriate
  memcpy(&arr, &SOURCE, sizeof arr);
}

The source "constant" can be declared as static in order to avoid re-initialization, if the compiler is not smart enough to optimize it by itself.

In the future version of the language a feature similar to C's compound literals is planned, which will provide support for immediate initialization (basically what you tried to do in your original post).

  • This has a C++ tag (not a C tag), so I'd prefer std::copy() (and expect it to fall back on std::memcpy() when appropriate). Cubbi did that right. – sbi Jun 10 '10 at 6:50
  • @sbi: Unfortunately array type is not assignable in C++, which is why there's no immediately legal std::copy-based solution. Cubbi did it wrong (formally speaking), because he reinterpreted a 2D array as an 1D array. This is formally illegal in C++ and a pedantic (debugging) implementation has all rights to crash on that code. There's no elegant solution with one std::copy. You have to do nested copying to copy a 2D array in a pedantically correct way. – AnT Jun 10 '10 at 7:16
  • You do have a point there. While I cannot imagine an implementation where 2-dimensional arrays aren't contiguous, if they are, using std::memcpy() will be just as good. – sbi Jun 11 '10 at 10:51
  • Ha! Except when you're not using built-ins! Then, using std::copy() would be causing "less UB" then using std::memcpy() does. :) – sbi Jun 11 '10 at 10:52
1

If you wish to fill the array with a single value:

#include<algorithm>
#include<vector>

// ...
std::vector<int> arr;
std::fill(arr.begin(), arr.end(), VALUE);  // VALUE is an integer

If you wish to calculate the value for each element:

struct get_value {
    int operator()() const { /* calculate and return value ... */ }
};

std::generate(arr.begin(), arr.end(), get_value());
0

If you are setting everything to the same value (such as zero), you may be able to get away with ...

memset (arr, 0, sizeof (arr));

Note that this is fraught with perils. You have to know your type sizes and all that jazz.

However, it appears that that will not suffice for you. If you want to fill the array with different values, I can only only think of two ways of doing this.

Method #1. (Can be a pain the butt)

arr[0][0] = 1;
...
arr[0][3] = 1;
arr[1][0] = 1;
...
arr[1][3] = 4;
arr[2][0] = 2;
...
arr[2][3] = 5;
arr[3][0] = 3;
...
arr[3][3] = 6;

Method #2. Predefine a set of arrays and switch between them using a pointer;

int  arr1[4][4] = {
        {0,0,0,0},
        {0,0,0,0},
        {0,0,0,0},
        {0,0,0,0} };
int  arr2[4][4] = {
        {1,1,1,1},
        {1,2,3,4},
        {2,,3,4,5},
        {3,4,5,6} };

int *arr[4];

Now you only have the four (4) values of *arr[] to set instead of setting everything. Of course, this really only works if your arrays will be filled with predetermined constants.

Hope this helps.

  • I think you meant int (*arr)[4]. In C++, might as well do: int (&arr)[4] = (someothervariable == 1) ? arr2 : arr1. – GManNickG Jun 9 '10 at 22:35
0

I'm not sure if I like this solution or not, but C/C++ will give you assignment convenience if you wrap the array inside a struct with the minor cost of then having to use the struct name to get at the array:

typedef struct {
    int data[4][4];
} info_t;

info_t arr;

if (someothervariable == 1){
    static const info_t newdata = {{  // since this is static const, there generally
                                      // won't be a copy - that data will be 'baked' 
                                      // into the binary image (or at worst a
                                      // single copy will occur)
        {1,1,1,1},
        {1,2,3,4},
        {2,3,4,5},
        {3,4,5,6} 
    }};
    arr = newdata;  // easy to assign new data to the array
}

int somethingelse = arr.data[1][2]; // a tiny bit less convenient to get 
                                    //    to the array data
  • This is C++, so the typedef isn't necessary. (BTW, he inconvenience could be overcome by overloading operator[] for info_t.) – sbi Jun 10 '10 at 6:52
-2
int arr[4][4];
if (someothervariable == 1) {
     int tmp[4][4] = { {1, 1, 1, 1}, {1, 2, 3, 4}, {2, 3, 4, 5}, {3, 4, 5, 6} };
     arr = tmp;
}
  • Arrays are not assignable. arr = tmp will not compile. – AnT Jun 9 '10 at 22:34

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