11

I'm making some scatterplots using Matplotlib (python 3.4.0, matplotlib 1.4.3, running on Linux Mint 17). It's easy enough to set alpha transparency for each point individually; is there any way to set them as a group, so that two overlapping points from the same group don't change the color?

Example code:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

def points(n=100):
    x = np.random.uniform(size=n)
    y = np.random.uniform(size=n)
    return x, y
x1, y1 = points()
x2, y2 = points()
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(4,4))
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, title="Test scatter")
ax.scatter(x1, y1, s=100, color="blue", alpha=0.5)
ax.scatter(x2, y2, s=100, color="red", alpha=0.5)
fig.savefig("test_scatter.png")

Results in this output:

enter image description here

but I want something more like this one:

enter image description here

I can workaround by saving as SVG and manually grouping then in Inkscape, then setting transparency, but I'd really prefer something I can code. Any suggestions?

  • Probably not, because doing that is counter to what a scatterplot is usually trying to show. – cphlewis May 7 '15 at 17:57
8

Yes, interesting question. You can get this scatterplot with Shapely. Here is the code :

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.patches as ptc
import numpy as np
from shapely.geometry import Point
from shapely.ops import cascaded_union

n = 100
size = 0.02
alpha = 0.5

def points():
    x = np.random.uniform(size=n)
    y = np.random.uniform(size=n)
    return x, y

x1, y1 = points()
x2, y2 = points()
polygons1 = [Point(x1[i], y1[i]).buffer(size) for i in range(n)]
polygons2 = [Point(x2[i], y2[i]).buffer(size) for i in range(n)]
polygons1 = cascaded_union(polygons1)
polygons2 = cascaded_union(polygons2)

fig = plt.figure(figsize=(4,4))
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, title="Test scatter")
for polygon1 in polygons1:
    polygon1 = ptc.Polygon(np.array(polygon1.exterior), facecolor="red", lw=0, alpha=alpha)
    ax.add_patch(polygon1)
for polygon2 in polygons2:
    polygon2 = ptc.Polygon(np.array(polygon2.exterior), facecolor="blue", lw=0, alpha=alpha)
    ax.add_patch(polygon2)
ax.axis([-0.2, 1.2, -0.2, 1.2])

fig.savefig("test_scatter.png")

and the result is :

Test scatter

  • 1
    Very cool use of shapely where I would never have expected it! Do you think the descartes package would simplify the plotting at all? – Paul H May 7 '15 at 20:52
  • Thanks ! Yes, the descartes package can be used. After the cascaded_union: create patches with descartes.PolygonPatch, use matplotlib.collections.PathCollection and replace add_patch by add_collection. This will do the job with fewer lines. – Flabetvibes May 7 '15 at 22:19
8

Interesting question, I think any use of transparency will result in the stacking effect you want to avoid. You could manually set a transparency type colour to get closer to the results you want,

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

def points(n=100):
    x = np.random.uniform(size=n)
    y = np.random.uniform(size=n)
    return x, y
x1, y1 = points()
x2, y2 = points()
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(4,4))
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, title="Test scatter")
alpha = 0.5
ax.scatter(x1, y1, s=100, lw = 0, color=[1., alpha, alpha])
ax.scatter(x2, y2, s=100, lw = 0, color=[alpha, alpha, 1.])
plt.show()

The overlap between the different colours are not included in this way but you get,

enter image description here

  • Bonus: it doesn't require an additional library! – jvriesem Dec 13 '16 at 16:46
  • You can't see the red through the blue or vice versa though. – sfjac Jan 11 '17 at 19:55
  • I think the color is wrong, it should be a RGBA tuple, instead of a RGB so: [0,0,1,0.5] should be transparent blue – Kev1n91 Dec 27 '18 at 19:33
  • 1
    @Kev1n91, setting alpha to anything other than one (the default for an RGB value with no alpha) means you can see the overlap, which the OP specified they did not want: "overlapping points from the same group don't change the color" – Ed Smith Dec 29 '18 at 17:23
2

This is a terrible, terrible hack, but it works.

You see while Matplotlib plots data points as separate objects that can overlap, it plots the line between them as a single object - even if that line is broken into several pieces by NaNs in the data.

With that in mind, you can do this:

import numpy as np
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

plt.rcParams['lines.solid_capstyle'] = 'round'

def expand(x, y, gap=1e-4):
    add = np.tile([0, gap, np.nan], len(x))
    x1 = np.repeat(x, 3) + add
    y1 = np.repeat(y, 3) + add
    return x1, y1

x1, y1 = points()
x2, y2 = points()
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(4,4))
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, title="Test scatter")
ax.plot(*expand(x1, y1), lw=20, color="blue", alpha=0.5)
ax.plot(*expand(x2, y2), lw=20, color="red", alpha=0.5)

fig.savefig("test_scatter.png")
plt.show()

And each color will overlap with the other color but not with itself.

enter image description here

One caveat is that you have to be careful with the spacing between the two points you use to make each circle. If they're two far apart then the separation will be visible on your plot, but if they're too close together, matplotlib doesn't plot the line at all. That means that the separation needs to be chosen based on the range of your data, and if you plan to make an interactive plot then there's a risk of all the data points suddenly vanishing if you zoom out too much, and stretching if you zoom in too much.

As you can see, I found 1e-5 to be a good separation for data with a range of [0,1].

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.