2

I have written some piece of code as below. Here there is an outer class and an inner class. I want a functionality similar to inner static class of java. So I declare the inner class object as static. The output comes fine:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class X {

    private:
    X() {}
    public:

        class Y {
            public:
                virtual void f() = 0;
        };
        class Z:public Y {
            public:
                Z(X& val) : x(val) {}
                void f() {
                    cout << "Programming";
                    x.i = 5;
                }
            private:
                X& x;
        };
        static Z getZ() {
            return z;
        }
    private:
        static Z z;
        int i;
};

X::Z  X::z = X::getZ();

int main()
{
    X::getZ().f();
    return 0;
}

I am not able to understand this statement though. How does it work?

X::Z  X::z = X::getZ();

Edit: How do I initialize an instance of inner class then? Also I get a segmentation fault when I assign below which may be because of self assignment.

 x.i = 5;
  • 1
    and X::z is initialized by a copy of itself... :/ – Jarod42 May 7 '15 at 19:18
  • ... which should be undefined behavior. – Dieter Lücking May 7 '15 at 19:21
2

Since z is a static member variable, it requires a definition. The line of code you are looking at is that definition.

X::Z  X::z = X::getZ();

X::Z (note the uppercase Z) is the type, X::z (note the lowercase z) is the variable, and it is initialized by the return value of the X::getZ() static member function.

It turns out X::getZ() is simply returning X::z. Although it appears redundant, it suppresses the execution of the default constructor for X::z, and uses the copy constructor instead.

Static objects are zero initialized before the static initializations are performed. If the object is correctly initialized by zero initialization, the copy constructor on self does not do any particular harm. However, in this case X::Z has a reference member variable x which is left zero initialized. Accessing x would lead to undefined behavior.


You added an additional question regarding the proper initialization of the static member z.

Since you are providing an accessor method for z in the form of X::getZ(), a better solution is to avoid the static member variable, and place a static instance inside the X::getZ() function itself. Since z will require an instance of X to be initialized properly, one should be provided.

class X {
//...
public:
    static Z & getZ() {
        static X x;
        static Z z(x);
        return z;
    }
private:
    int i;
};

The return type for X::getZ() is changed to be a reference to the static instance, so that the instance can be manipulated.

1

I am not able to understand this statement though.

This is a definition of a static variable declared inside class X. Here is what each part of it means:

  • X::Z says that the type of the static data member being defined is Z, which is defined inside class X.
  • X::z means that we are defining a static member called z declared inside class X
  • = X::getZ() means that z is to be initialized to the value returned from getZ() member function.

However, this is not a good code, because getZ uses the very z that it initializes, before the variable gets a chance to be initialized.

0

This is the definition of the static variable X::z. Some static data members require a namespace-scope definition if they are later used in a context that requires the data member to exist in physical memory.

The definition has the format of a normal variable declaration, except its name is qualified to denote that it is a static member:

X::Z is the type of the member, and X::z is a qualified-id designating its name. This statement initializes its value to the return value of the static member function X::getZ(), which is itself.

Note that this undefined behavior since X::getZ() returns z in its uninitialized state.

  • Can you tell me whats the correct way to get an instance of above static instance of inner class? – tariq zafar May 7 '15 at 19:30
  • @tariqzafar Well you first need an instance of X to send to Z's constructor. You can do static X x; X::Z X::z(x). – 0x499602D2 May 7 '15 at 19:34
  • Is it possible to do so with a private constructor of outer class? – tariq zafar May 7 '15 at 19:39
  • @tariqzafar z is not an X, it's a Z, so you can't use any of X's constructors. Why not change the type of z to X and then add the appropriate constructor? – 0x499602D2 May 7 '15 at 19:42

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