2

I am writing a python program which pings devices and reports online/offline status and latency. Right now it is working fine but whenever there are devices offline or not responding the output hangs for about 5 seconds.

My question is can I either ping everything independently and not sequentially and/or can I set a time filter of some sort on the subprocess so that, if things aren't updated after ~100-200ms it moves on to the next?

Here is the relevant part of the code I am currently working on

for item in lines:
#remove whitespaces, etc from item.
hostname = item.rstrip()

#Run ping and return output to stdout.
#subprocess.Popen runs cmdline ping, pipes the output to stdout. .stdout.read() then reads that stream data and assigns it to the ping_response variable
ping_response = subprocess.Popen(["ping", hostname, "-n", '1'], stdout=subprocess.PIPE).stdout.read()
word = "Received = 1"
word2 = "Destination host unreachable."

#Regex for finding the time values and inputting them in to a list.
p = re.compile(ur'(?<=time[<=])\S+')
x = re.findall(p, ping_response)
if word2 in ping_response:
    print "Destination Unreachable"
elif word in ping_response:
    print "%s is online with latency of " % hostname +x[0]
else:
    print "%s is offlineOffline" % hostname
  • 1
    This would be a very good application for multithreading, because your program isn't CPU or I/O bound, but instead is waiting most of the time (on the network, or on a timeout). Doug Hellmann's article on the threading module would be a good place to start. – Lukas Graf May 7 '15 at 19:40
  • @LukasGraf: You don't need threads here (though they can be used); Popen() creates a separate process and returns immidiately without waiting for the child process to exit. You don't want 1000 threads/processes to ping 1000 hosts in parallel. Async. I/O could be used here (a select-like loop such as used in twisted, asyncio, gevent libraries). – jfs May 9 '15 at 12:43
  • related: Multiple ping script in Python – jfs May 9 '15 at 12:46
  • @J.F.Sebastian "You don't want 1000 threads/processes to ping 1000 hosts in parallel" - that's exactly what you're doing in your Popen() multiple ping script though, no? I don't see any sort of pooling there. With threads you'd obviously use thread pooling like you did in your other example. – Lukas Graf May 9 '15 at 13:09
  • @LukasGraf: the script creates 100 processes, not 1000. If OP needs to ping thousands hosts concurrently then async. io should be considered (as well as thread pooling). – jfs May 9 '15 at 13:15
2

My question is can I either ping everything independently and not sequentially

Sure. There are a variety of solutions to that problem, including both the threading and multiprocessing modules.

and/or can I set a time filter of some sort on the subprocess so that, if things aren't updated after ~100-200ms it moves on to the next?

You can actually set a timeout on ping itself, at least the Linux version, using the -W option:

   -W timeout
          Time to wait for a response, in seconds. The option affects only
          timeout in absence of any responses, otherwise  ping  waits  for
          two RTTs.
2

Ping has a timeout feature which will help your script's efficiency.

-W waittime
             Time in milliseconds to wait for a reply for each packet sent.  If a reply arrives later, the packet
             is not printed as replied, but considered as replied when calculating statistics.

Also, here are some other utilities to ping efficiently.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.