5

I'm trying to understand what exactly happens internally in storage engine level when a row(columns) is inserted in a CQL style table.

CREATE TABLE log_date (
  userid bigint,
  time timeuuid,
  category text,
  subcategory text,
  itemid text,
  count int,
  price int,
  PRIMARY KEY ((userid), time) - #1
  PRIMARY KEY ((userid), time, category, subcategory, itemid, count, price) - #2
);

Suppose that I have a table like above.

In case of #1, a CQL row will generate 6(or 5?) columns in storage.
In case of #2, a CQL row will generate a very composite column in storage.

I'm wondering what's more effective way for storing logs into Cassandra.
Please focus on those given two situations.
I don't need any real-time reads. Just writings.



If you want to suggest other options please refer to the following.
The reasons I chose Cassandra for storing logs are

  1. Linear scalability and good for heavy writing.
  2. It has schema in CQL. I really prefer having a schema.
  3. Seems to support Spark well enough. Datastax's cassandra-spark connector seems to have data locality awareness.
  • When dealing with no-SQL dbs, the first question to ask is: what queries do I need to do on the data? – maasg May 8 '15 at 8:20
  • I've done enough research on that kind of stuffs. Like partitioning strategy, avoid making hot spots, etc.. – Woojun Kim May 8 '15 at 8:45
  • so, what queries do you need to run on the collected data? – maasg May 8 '15 at 8:47
  • I'm just curious about the read/write performance, pros and cons of those two cases. – Woojun Kim May 8 '15 at 8:47
  • category, subcategory, itemid, count, price will not be used for querying condition. – Woojun Kim May 8 '15 at 8:55
7

I'm trying to understand what exactly happens internally in storage engine level when a row(columns) is inserted in a CQL style table.

Let's say that I build tables with both of your PRIMARY KEYs, and INSERT some data:

aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow2> SELECT userid, time, dateof(time), category, subcategory, itemid, count, price FROM log_date1;

 userid | time                                 | dateof(time)             | category | subcategory    | itemid            | count | price
--------+--------------------------------------+--------------------------+----------+----------------+-------------------+-------+-------
   1002 | e2f67ec0-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:48:20-0500 |    Books |         Novels | 678-2-44398-312-9 |     1 |   798
   1002 | 15d0fd20-f589-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:49:45-0500 |    Audio |     Headphones | 228-5-44343-344-5 |     1 |  4799
   1001 | 32671010-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:43:23-0500 |    Books | Computer Books | 978-1-78398-912-6 |     1 |  2200
   1001 | 74ad4f70-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:45:14-0500 |    Books |         Novels | 678-2-44398-312-9 |     1 |   798
   1001 | a3e1f750-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:46:34-0500 |    Books | Computer Books | 977-8-78998-466-4 |     1 |   599

(5 rows)
aploetz@cqlsh:stackoverflow2> SELECT userid, time, dateof(time), category, subcategory, itemid, count, price FROM log_date2;

 userid | time                                 | dateof(time)             | category | subcategory    | itemid            | count | price
--------+--------------------------------------+--------------------------+----------+----------------+-------------------+-------+-------
   1002 | e2f67ec0-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:48:20-0500 |    Books |         Novels | 678-2-44398-312-9 |     1 |   798
   1002 | 15d0fd20-f589-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:49:45-0500 |    Audio |     Headphones | 228-5-44343-344-5 |     1 |  4799
   1001 | 32671010-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:43:23-0500 |    Books | Computer Books | 978-1-78398-912-6 |     1 |  2200
   1001 | 74ad4f70-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:45:14-0500 |    Books |         Novels | 678-2-44398-312-9 |     1 |   798
   1001 | a3e1f750-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d | 2015-05-08 08:46:34-0500 |    Books | Computer Books | 977-8-78998-466-4 |     1 |   599

(5 rows)

Looks pretty much the same via cqlsh. So let's have a look from the cassandra-cli, and query all rows foor userid 1002:

RowKey: 1002
=> (name=e2f67ec0-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:, value=, timestamp=1431092900008568)
=> (name=e2f67ec0-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:category, value=426f6f6b73, timestamp=1431092900008568)
=> (name=e2f67ec0-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:count, value=00000001, timestamp=1431092900008568)
=> (name=e2f67ec0-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:itemid, value=3637382d322d34343339382d3331322d39, timestamp=1431092900008568)
=> (name=e2f67ec0-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:price, value=0000031e, timestamp=1431092900008568)
=> (name=e2f67ec0-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:subcategory, value=4e6f76656c73, timestamp=1431092900008568)
=> (name=15d0fd20-f589-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:, value=, timestamp=1431092985326774)
=> (name=15d0fd20-f589-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:category, value=417564696f, timestamp=1431092985326774)
=> (name=15d0fd20-f589-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:count, value=00000001, timestamp=1431092985326774)
=> (name=15d0fd20-f589-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:itemid, value=3232382d352d34343334332d3334342d35, timestamp=1431092985326774)
=> (name=15d0fd20-f589-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:price, value=000012bf, timestamp=1431092985326774)
=> (name=15d0fd20-f589-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:subcategory, value=4865616470686f6e6573, timestamp=1431092985326774)

Simple enough, right? We see userid 1002 as the RowKey, and our clustering column of time as a column key. Following that, are all of our columns for each column key (time). And I believe your first instance generates 6 columns, as I'm pretty sure that includes the placeholder for the column key, because your PRIMARY KEY could point to an empty value (as your 2nd example key does).

But what about the 2nd version for userid 1002?

RowKey: 1002
=> (name=e2f67ec0-f588-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:Books:Novels:678-2-44398-312-9:1:798:, value=, timestamp=1431093011349994)
=> (name=15d0fd20-f589-11e4-ade7-21b264d4c94d:Audio:Headphones:228-5-44343-344-5:1:4799:, value=, timestamp=1431093011360402)

Two columns are returned for RowKey 1002, one for each unique combination of our column (clustering) keys, with an empty value (as mentioned above).

So what does this all mean for you? Well, a few things:

  • This should tell you that PRIMARY KEYs in Cassandra ensure uniqueness. So if you decide that you need to update key values like category or subcategory (2nd example) that you really can't unless you DELETE and recreate the row. Although from a logging perspective, that's probably ok.
  • Cassandra stores all data for a particular partition/row key (userid) together, sorted by the column (clustering) keys. If you were concerned about querying and sorting your data, it would be important to understand that you would have to query for each specific userid for sort order to make any difference.
  • The biggest issue I see, is that right now you are setting yourself up for unbounded column growth. Partition/row keys can support a maximum of 2 billion columns, so your 2nd example will help you out the most there. If you think some of your userids might exceed that, you could implement a "date bucket" as an additional partition key (say, if you knew that a userid would never exceed more than 2 billion in a year, or whatever).

It looks to me like your 2nd option might be the better choice. But honestly for what you're doing, either of them will probably work ok.

  • Thank you for your long detailed answer. Can i ask you one more thing? Do you think that 2nd option might be better even after adding the date bucket partition key to my table schema? – Woojun Kim May 10 '15 at 3:20
  • And can you point me out to the source code which saves/loads composite columns to/from SSTable? – Woojun Kim May 10 '15 at 3:27
  • @WoojunKim The only drawback that adding a date bucket on to your partition key has, is you have to also send that along when querying. But since querying isn't really a prime concern for you, I don't think it'll really hurt either scenario. As for the source code, I'm not sure where that part is. Try searching through the project on GitHub. – Aaron May 11 '15 at 16:07

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