2

So I am trying to implement a custom partitioner using Spark with Java, and I found a great example of how to do this online, but it is using Scala, and I cannot for the life of me figure out how it translates properly into Java so I can try to implement it. Can anyone help? Here is the example code I found for it in Scala:

class DomainNamePartitioner(numParts: Int) extends Partitioner {
  override def numPartitions: Int = numParts
  override def getPartition(key: Any): Int = {
    val domain = new Java.net.URL(key.toString).getHost()
    val code = (domain.hashCode % numPartitions)
    if (code < 0) {
      code + numPartitions  // Make it non-negative
    } else {
      code
    }
  } 
  // Java equals method to let Spark compare our Partitioner objects
  override def equals(other: Any): Boolean = other match {
    case dnp: DomainNamePartitioner =>
      dnp.numPartitions == numPartitions
    case _ =>
      false
  }
}
  • Uhm, can the modulo operator really return a negative number? Or % is not modulo in scala? – fge May 9 '15 at 9:24
  • @fge yes it can, as in almost all C derived languages. The % is defined as the remainder, which can be negative. – Lomig Mégard May 9 '15 at 10:55
2

First of all, Scala is the first choice to write Spark.

Here is the corresponding Java code (it is not the unique version):

see more at : https://spark.apache.org/docs/latest/api/java/index.html

class DomainNamePartitioner extends Partitioner{

private int numParts;

public Partitioner()
{

}
public Partitioner(int numParts)
{
  this.numParts = numParts;
}

@Override
public int numPartitions()
{
    return numParts;
}
@Override
public int getPartition(Object key){

   String domain = new Java.net.URL(key.toString).getHost();
   int code = domain.hashCode % numPartitions;
   if (code < 0){
    return code + this.numPartitions();
   }else{
    return code;
   }
}

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj){

    if (obj instanceof DomainNamePartitioner){
        DomainNamePartitioner pObj = (DomainNamePartitioner)obj;
        return pObj.numPartitions() == this.numPartitions;
    }else{
        return false;
    }
}
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.