1

This question already has an answer here:

Is this statement/example valid for checked and unchecked exception?

Unchecked Exception: The exceptions that are not checked at compile time are called unchecked exceptions. Example:

 public class UncheckedException {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

            int value = 10/0;
        }
    }

Checked Exception: The exceptions that are checked at compile time are called Checked exceptions. Example:

public class CheckedException {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        try {
                int value = 10/0;
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.out.println("Caught " + e);
            }

        }
    }

marked as duplicate by Rüdiger Herrmann, Mark Rotteveel java May 10 '15 at 10:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4

No it is not a valid example / illustration. In both cases the exception that is thrown is an unchecked exception.

The difference between checked exceptions and unchecked exceptions is the exception class.

  • ArithmeticException is always an unchecked exception because it extends RuntimeException

  • IOException is a checked exception because it does not extend RuntimeException (or Error).

The fact that you do or don't catch the exception doesn't change its nature.


At the risk of repeating myself:

Unchecked Exception: The exceptions that are not checked at compile time are called unchecked exceptions.

Checked Exception: The exceptions that are checked at compile time are called Checked exceptions.

These are both incorrect definitions.


See also: Java: checked vs unchecked exception explanation

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