424

How do I concatenate the following combinations of types:

  • str and str
  • String and str
  • String and String
2

8 Answers 8

527

When you concatenate strings, you need to allocate memory to store the result. The easiest to start with is String and &str:

fn main() {
    let mut owned_string: String = "hello ".to_owned();
    let borrowed_string: &str = "world";
    
    owned_string.push_str(borrowed_string);
    println!("{}", owned_string);
}

Here, we have an owned string that we can mutate. This is efficient as it potentially allows us to reuse the memory allocation. There's a similar case for String and String, as &String can be dereferenced as &str.

fn main() {
    let mut owned_string: String = "hello ".to_owned();
    let another_owned_string: String = "world".to_owned();
    
    owned_string.push_str(&another_owned_string);
    println!("{}", owned_string);
}

After this, another_owned_string is untouched (note no mut qualifier). There's another variant that consumes the String but doesn't require it to be mutable. This is an implementation of the Add trait that takes a String as the left-hand side and a &str as the right-hand side:

fn main() {
    let owned_string: String = "hello ".to_owned();
    let borrowed_string: &str = "world";
    
    let new_owned_string = owned_string + borrowed_string;
    println!("{}", new_owned_string);
}

Note that owned_string is no longer accessible after the call to +.

What if we wanted to produce a new string, leaving both untouched? The simplest way is to use format!:

fn main() {
    let borrowed_string: &str = "hello ";
    let another_borrowed_string: &str = "world";
    
    let together = format!("{}{}", borrowed_string, another_borrowed_string);

    // After https://rust-lang.github.io/rfcs/2795-format-args-implicit-identifiers.html
    // let together = format!("{borrowed_string}{another_borrowed_string}");

    println!("{}", together);
}

Note that both input variables are immutable, so we know that they aren't touched. If we wanted to do the same thing for any combination of String, we can use the fact that String also can be formatted:

fn main() {
    let owned_string: String = "hello ".to_owned();
    let another_owned_string: String = "world".to_owned();
    
    let together = format!("{}{}", owned_string, another_owned_string);

    // After https://rust-lang.github.io/rfcs/2795-format-args-implicit-identifiers.html
    // let together = format!("{owned_string}{another_owned_string}");
    println!("{}", together);
}

You don't have to use format! though. You can clone one string and append the other string to the new string:

fn main() {
    let owned_string: String = "hello ".to_owned();
    let borrowed_string: &str = "world";
    
    let together = owned_string.clone() + borrowed_string;
    println!("{}", together);
}

Note - all of the type specification I did is redundant - the compiler can infer all the types in play here. I added them simply to be clear to people new to Rust, as I expect this question to be popular with that group!

8
  • 2
    What do you think about Add / + symbol? You could cover it if you want.
    – bluss
    May 10, 2015 at 23:48
  • Maybe that's simple enough, but understanding it requires looking at the possible type signatures for Add with String.
    – bluss
    May 10, 2015 at 23:50
  • 1
    @jsalter that's a pretty separate topic, so it may be good as another top-level question. I have updated to link to the appropriate docs (as close as I can get, at least...)
    – Shepmaster
    May 12, 2015 at 12:21
  • 15
    @ChrisMorgan It should be noted that the discrepancy .to_owned() and .to_string() has been fixed since the above comment thanks to impl specialization. They both now have the same performance when called on a &str. Relevant commit: github.com/rust-lang/rust/pull/32586/files
    – chad
    Nov 23, 2016 at 2:30
  • 1
    @paddyg Yes, it's kind of subtle. The starting types are both String, but then you take a reference to one (&String) which can be coerced to a &str. I put the entire path String -> &String -> &str because beginners may not even realize that you can take a reference to a String. :-)
    – Shepmaster
    Nov 17, 2017 at 14:07
92

To concatenate multiple strings into a single string, separated by another character, there are a couple of ways.

The nicest I have seen is using the join method on an array:

fn main() {
    let a = "Hello";
    let b = "world";
    let result = [a, b].join("\n");

    print!("{}", result);
}

Depending on your use case you might also prefer more control:

fn main() {
    let a = "Hello";
    let b = "world";
    let result = format!("{}\n{}", a, b);

    print!("{}", result);
}

There are some more manual ways I have seen, some avoiding one or two allocations here and there. For readability purposes I find the above two to be sufficient.

3
  • Where is join documented? It seems to sit halfway between an Array and a String. I searched through the array documentation and was quickly confused.
    – Duane J
    Jan 10, 2018 at 21:51
  • 3
    @DuaneJ join is actually attached to the SliceContactExt trait. The trait is marked unstable but its methods are stable and are included in the Prelude so they're usable everywhere by default. The team appear to be well aware this trait does not need to exist and I imagine things will change in future with it. Jan 10, 2018 at 22:45
  • 2
    Perhaps you should mention that join is more efficient than s1.to_owned().push_str(s2) for concatenating two str's as it avoids the second allocation. Mar 19, 2021 at 15:36
59

Simple ways to concatenate strings in Rust

There are various methods available in Rust to concatenate strings

First method (Using concat!() ):

fn main() {
    println!("{}", concat!("a", "b"))
}

The output of the above code is :

ab


Second method (using push_str() and + operator):

fn main() {
    let mut _a = "a".to_string();
    let _b = "b".to_string();
    let _c = "c".to_string();

    _a.push_str(&_b);

    println!("{}", _a);

    println!("{}", _a + &_c);
}

The output of the above code is:

ab

abc


Third method (Using format!()):

fn main() {
    let mut _a = "a".to_string();
    let _b = "b".to_string();
    let _c = format!("{}{}", _a, _b);

    println!("{}", _c);
}

The output of the above code is :

ab

Check it out and experiment with Rust playground.

3
  • 6
    This answer does not add anything new to the existing answers.
    – Shepmaster
    Jan 14, 2020 at 15:17
  • 11
    The answer is nicely formatted, which serves a purpose. It may not add anything new, but I'm glad @ashwin-rajeev boiled it down.
    – fuma
    Sep 21, 2021 at 9:26
  • concat only works with literals, so, not super useful. Jun 23 at 6:08
23

I think that concat method and + should be mentioned here as well:

assert_eq!(
  ("My".to_owned() + " " + "string"),
  ["My", " ", "string"].concat()
);

and there is also concat! macro but only for literals:

let s = concat!("test", 10, 'b', true);
assert_eq!(s, "test10btrue");
3
  • 1
    + is already mentioned in an existing answer. (This is an implementation of the Add trait that takes a String as the left-hand side and a &str as the right-hand side:)
    – Shepmaster
    Jan 14, 2020 at 15:19
  • 4
    True, existing answer is so broad I didn't notice though.
    – suside
    Jan 15, 2020 at 18:14
  • 2
    Best answer so far. Just use array method or concat for strings. Macros are just handy for hiding some syntax rather than inventing complex syntax making core language cryptic. Add trait could be nice for objects but can be confusing at least.
    – Anssi
    Jul 31, 2020 at 9:32
15

Concatenation by String Interpolation

UPDATE: As of 2021, Dec 28, this is available in Rust 1.58 Beta. You no longer need Rust Nightly build to do String Interpolation. (Leaving remainder of answer unchanged for posterity).

RFC 2795 issued 2019-10-27: Suggests support for implicit arguments to do what many people would know as "string interpolation" -- a way of embedding arguments within a string to concatenate them.

RFC: https://rust-lang.github.io/rfcs/2795-format-args-implicit-identifiers.html

Latest issue status can be found here: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/issues/67984

At the time of this writing (2020-9-24), I believe this feature should be available in the Rust Nightly build.

This will allow you to concatenate via the following shorthand:

format_args!("hello {person}")

It is equivalent to this:

format_args!("hello {person}", person=person)

There is also the "ifmt" crate, which provides its own kind of string interpolation:

https://crates.io/crates/ifmt

1
  • 1
    Now this is available in Rust 1.58 Beta.
    – at54321
    Dec 28, 2021 at 12:56
0

As of Rust 1.58, you can also concatenate two or more variables like this: format!("{a}{b}{c}"). That's basically the same as format!("{}{}{}", a, b, c), but a bit shorter and (arguably) easier to read. Those variables can be String, &str (and also other non-string types for that matter). The result is a String. See this for more.

-2

By Default in Rust is all about MemoryManage and Owenership and Move, we dont see usually like copy or deep copy hence if you are trying to concatinate strings then left hand side should type String which is growable and should be mutable type, the right hand side can be normal string literal a.k.a type String slices

    fn main (){
            let mut x = String::from("Hello"); // type String
            let y = "World" // type &str
            println!("data printing -------> {}",x+y);



}

official statement from doc, this is pointing to when you are trying using arthmatic + operator enter image description here

-7
fn main() {
    let a = String::from("Name");
    let b = "Pkgamer";
    println!("{}",a+b)
}
1
  • In case you're wondering why you're getting downvoted: You're not providing any explanatory text, your answer doesn't address the question fully (what about the three combinations of &str/String?), and your answer doesn't add much over e.g. this one.
    – Caesar
    Mar 1 at 13:15

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