-1

I would expect the following code to produce equality, but bool values are shown to be different.

#include <iostream>

union crazyBool
{
    unsigned char uc;
    bool b;
};

int main()
{
    crazyBool a, b;
    a.uc = 1;
    b.uc = 5;

    if(a.b == b.b)
    {
            std::cout << "==" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
            std::cout << "!=" << std::endl;
    }

    bool x, y;
    void *xVP = &x, *yVP = &y;
    unsigned char *xP = static_cast<unsigned char*>(xVP);
    unsigned char *yP = static_cast<unsigned char*>(yVP);

    (*xP) = (unsigned char)1;
    (*yP) = (unsigned char)5;

    if(x == y)
    {
            std::cout << "==" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
            std::cout << "!=" << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

Note that here we are not only changing the value through union (which was pointed out as being undefined), but also accessing memory directly via void pointer.

  • 6
    "I would expect" - and that's where you went wrong - what you've done has undefined behaviour, which should be so expected I'm not going to bother quoting the Standard to prove it to you. – Tony Delroy May 11 '15 at 5:49
  • 1
    You have to initialize a.b and b.b. Not sure how this leads you to your "bitwise" conclusion, whatever that means. – juanchopanza May 11 '15 at 5:50
  • 1
    @Volodya: most certainly - there's a very precise description of how you're allowed to set and then read fields in unions. – Tony Delroy May 11 '15 at 5:52
  • 1
    Somewhat related – Levi May 11 '15 at 5:53
  • 2
    @Volodya Answer to your edit: bool operations are not required to handle every possible unsiged char value, and unsigned char can have a different size, so your code is even more undefined now. And no one is trolling, except maybe for you because you´re changing the question completely after closing. – deviantfan May 11 '15 at 6:55
3

If you assign to a member of a union, that member becomes the active member.

Reading any member other than the active one is undefined behavior, meaning that anything could happen. There are a few specific exceptions to this rule, depending on the version of the C++ standard your compiler is following; but none of these exceptions apply in your case.

(One of the exceptions is that if the union has multiple members of class type where the classes have the same initial members, these shared members can be read through any of the union's members.)

Edit to address the question clarification:

The standard defines bool as having the values true and false, no others. (C++11, 3.9.1/6) It never defines what it means to copy some other bit pattern over the storage (which is what you are doing). Since it doesn't define it, the behavior is undefined too.

Yes, when converting an integer to a bool 0 becomes false and anything else becomes true, but that is just a conversion rule, not a statement about bool's representation.

  • The point isn't about Unions, perhaps i should have removed them from the code all together, since perhaps i was using them in the way they weren't designed to be used. I was attempting to write directly into the memory space of bool, in order to control for conversion at initialisation. – v010dya Jul 27 '15 at 9:52
  • Edited to address question edit. – Sebastian Redl Jul 27 '15 at 11:03

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