7

file1.bat:

@echo off
 :Test
echo in file one
call file2.bat (Here i want to call only Demo routine in the file2.bat)

file2.bat:

:hello
echo in hello
:Demo
 echo in Demo

From the batch file1 I want to make a call to a sub routine in the batch file2.
I tried for example call file2.bat:Demo but it didn't give the correct result.

How I can achieve this?

6

the file with subroutines must look like:

@echo off
call :%*
exit /b %errorlevel%

:hello
echo in hello
exit /b 0
:Demo
 echo in Demo with argument %1
 exit /b 0

then from the other file you can call it like

call file2.bat demo "arg-one"
3
  • Did you read the answer of MCND? I think you like this sort of tricks or did you know it already? – jeb May 14 '15 at 8:53
  • this looks cleaner to me – Tomer W Jun 28 '16 at 13:27
  • 2
    I prefer to use GOTO with SHIFT instead of CALL, because CALL compounds the problems of % doubling, poison character escaping, and caret doubling. – dbenham Dec 27 '16 at 16:13
6

You can write your functions file (in this sample it is library.cmd) as

@echo off
    setlocal enableextensions
    rem Not to be directly called
    exit /b 9009

:test
    echo test [%*]
    goto :eof

:test2
    echo test2 [%*]
    goto :eof

:testErrorlevel
    echo testErrorlevel
    exit /b 1

And then the caller batch can be something like

@echo off
    setlocal enableextensions disabledelayedexpansion

    call :test arg1 arg2 arg3
    call :test2 arg4 arg5 arg6
    call :testErrorlevel && echo no errorlevel || echo errorlevel raised

    goto :eof

:test
:test2
    echo calling function %0
    library.cmd %*

:testErrorlevel
    echo calling function %0
    library.cmd 

In this case, the labels need to be defined with the same name in both files.

The direct invocation of the "library" batch file will replace the context of the call :label, and when the invoked batch is readed, a goto :label is internally executed and code continues inside the indicated label. When the called batch file ends, the context is released and the code after the call :label continues.

edited

As Jeb points in comments, there is a drawback in this method. The code running in the called batch file can not use %0 to retrieve the name of the function being called, it will return the name of the batch file. But if needed, the caller can do it as shown in the sample code.

edited 2016/12/27

Answering to dbenham, I have no way to know if it was a coding error or an intended feature, but this is how the process works

The lines in batch file are processed inside the inner BatLoop function when a batch "context" is created. This function receives, as one of its arguments, a pointer to the command that caused the "context" to be created.

Inside this function the commands in the batch file are iterated. The loop that iterates over the commands makes a test in each iteration: if extensions are enabled, it is the first line in the batch file and the arguments of the command that started the context starts with a colon (a label), a goto is generated to jump to the label.

Up to here, I have to suppose that this is the intended behaviour to handle the call :label syntax: create a new "context", load the file, jump to the label.

But the command argument received is never changed, a different variable is used to track the execution of the commands in the batch file. If a new batch file is loaded into / overwrites the current batch "context" (we have not used call command), after loading the new batch code, BatLoop resets the line count (we start at the first line of the loaded file) and, voila, the condition at the start of the loop (extensions enabled, first line, the colon) is true again (the pointed input command has not been changed) and a new goto is generated.

4
  • 2
    I like this trick, there is only one little drawback, in the called function in the secondary batch %0 contains not the function name it contains the batch file name, but as nearly nobody uses %0 for retrieving the current function name it's a really small difference – jeb May 14 '15 at 8:49
  • @jeb, of course you are right. Thinking in the possibility that someone could need the function name, the sample code posted included an echo retrieving the function name before delegating the rest of the work to the "library". Now it is included in the answer, thank you. – MC ND May 14 '15 at 9:31
  • 2
    The implicit GOTO can be chained arbitrarily deep. A function in library.cmd can execute library2.cmd (without CALL), and the library2.cmd will also perform the GOTO. I wonder if this feature was intentional? I can't imagine why the GOTO would be cached and executed every time a new script starts unless the designers wanted this feature. Very cool either way. – dbenham Dec 27 '16 at 16:04
  • @dbenham, answer updated to explain why the goto is executed, but I have no way to determine if it was or not intentional. – MC ND Dec 27 '16 at 20:01
0

To comment a bit more, here is the code I came out reading the answer. It basically give you a 'utility' file where you can add your sub/fnc in a common library for code maintenance.

A) As a example, here is the 'utility_sub.cmd' file:

REM ==============================================
REM             CALL THE SELECTED SUB
REM ==============================================
REM echo %~1
GOTO :%~1


REM ==============================================
REM               ERROR MANAGEMENT
REM ==============================================
    REM Ref : https://ss64.com/nt/exit.html
:RAISE_ERROR
    EXIT /B 1

:RESET_ERROR
    EXIT /B 0

    REM Demo call
    REM =========
    REM CALL :RAISE_ERROR
    REM echo RAISE_ERROR ERRORLEVEL = %ERRORLEVEL%

    REM If %ERRORLEVEL% GTR 0 (
        REM set msg="%tab%- Error detected ..."
        REM CALL :SUB_STDOUT_MSG !msg!, 1
    REM )

    REM CALL :RESET_ERROR
    REM echo RESET_ERROR ERRORLEVEL = %ERRORLEVEL%


REM ==============================================
REM                SUB_STDOUT_MSG
REM ==============================================
:SUB_STDOUT_MSG
    REM CALL :SUB_STDOUT_MSG "%param1%", %param2%, %param3%

    REM Instead of this stdout sub, we can use Unix 'tee.exe'
    REM but there is no 'line counter' feature like this sub
    REM   Call example : 
    REM     EDI_Generate_Stat_Csv | tee c:\temp\voir.txt
    REM   Def : 
    REM   Capture output from a program and also display the output to the screen, at the same time.

    REM %~1 => Expand %1 removing any surrounding quotes (")
    set msg=%~2
    set sendtoLog=%3
    set addCounter=%4

    If !msg!==. (
        REM Write empty line
        echo!msg!

        If !sendtoLog! EQU 1 (
            echo!msg! >> %log_file%
        )
    ) else (
        REM (a) Write comment line (b) add counter if any
        If !addCounter! EQU 1 (
            set /a msgCounter+=1
            set msg=!msgCounter! - !msg!

            REM Pad counter left for single digit
            If !msgCounter! LSS 10 (
                set msg=0!msg!
            )
        )

        REM Output to console
        echo !msg!

        REM Output to log
        If !sendtoLog! EQU 1 (
            echo !msg! >> %log_file%
        )
    )

    EXIT /B

B) And here is how to call the 'SUB_STDOUT_MSG' in you 'main-logic' command file:

REM ... some other code here

REM ==============================================
REM                PROGRAM END
REM ==============================================
    set msg=.
    CALL :SUB_STDOUT_MSG !msg!, 1
    set msg="My programA - End"
    CALL :SUB_STDOUT_MSG !msg!, 1
    set msg="%date:~0,4%-%date:~5,2%-%date:~8,2% %time:~0,2%:%time:~3,2%:%time:~6,2%"
    CALL :SUB_STDOUT_MSG !msg!, 1
    set msg="+++++++++++++++"
    CALL :SUB_STDOUT_MSG !msg!, 1

    timeout 2 > Nul

REM Skip all SUB ROUTINE
    GOTO :EOF


REM ==============================================
REM                CALL SUB ROUTINE
REM ==============================================
:SUB_STDOUT_MSG
    REM echo calling sub %0

    CALL "C:\Utilitaires\Financement\Utility_Sub.cmd" SUB_STDOUT_MSG %*
    EXIT /B

:EOF
0

What about providing the target label as the first agrument of the called script? You needed to modify the called dscript then though.

file1.bat (main):

@echo off
echo/
echo File "%~0":  call "file2.bat" [no arguments]
call "file2.bat"
echo/
echo File "%~0":  call "file2.bat" :DEMO
call "file2.bat" :DEMO
echo/
echo File "%~0":  call "file2.bat" :DEMO A B C
call "file2.bat" :DEMO A B C

file2.bat (sub):

@echo off
set "ARG1=%~1" & if not defined ARG1 goto :TEST
if "%ARG1:~,1%"==":" goto %ARG1%

:TEST
echo File "%~nx0", :TEST; arguments: %*
goto :EOF

:DEMO
echo File "%~nx0", :DEMO; arguments: %*
echo   before `shift /1`:
echo     "%%~0" refers to "%~0"
echo     "%%~1" refers to "%~1"
shift /1
echo   after  `shift /1`:
echo     "%%~0" refers to "%~0"
echo     "%%~1" refers to "%~1"
goto :EOF

Output:

>>> file1.bat

File "file1.bat":  call "file2.bat" [no arguments]
File "file2.bat", :TEST; arguments:

File "file1.bat":  call "file2.bat" :DEMO
File "file2.bat", :DEMO; arguments: :DEMO
  before `shift /1`:
    "%~0" refers to "file2.bat"
    "%~1" refers to ":DEMO"
  after  `shift /1`:
    "%~0" refers to "file2.bat"
    "%~1" refers to ""

File "file1.bat":  call "file2.bat" :DEMO A B C
File "file2.bat", :DEMO; arguments: :DEMO A B C
  before `shift /1`:
    "%~0" refers to "file2.bat"
    "%~1" refers to ":DEMO"
  after  `shift /1`:
    "%~0" refers to "file2.bat"
    "%~1" refers to "A"

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