90

What is the best and most convenient way to implement a Singleton pattern for a class in TypeScript? (Both with and without lazy initialisation).

16 Answers 16

69

Singleton classes in TypeScript are generally an anti-pattern. You can simply use namespaces instead.

Useless singleton pattern

class Singleton {
    /* ... lots of singleton logic ... */
    public someMethod() { ... }
}

// Using
var x = Singleton.getInstance();
x.someMethod();

Namespace equivalent

namespace Singleton {
    export function someMethod() { ... }
}
// Usage
Singleton.someMethod();
var x = Singleton; // If you need to alias it for some reason
  • 37
    it would be nice to now why is the singleton is considered an anti pattern? consider this approach codebelt.com/typescript/typescript-singleton-pattern – Victor Apr 25 '16 at 19:11
  • 12
    I'd like to know why Singletons in TypeScript are considered an anti-pattern too. And also if it doesn't have any constructor parameters why not export default new Singleton()? – emzero Jun 24 '16 at 5:57
  • 4
    He said "singleton classes" are considered an anti-pattern, not "singletons". I suppose that it makes sense when you consider that a class is generally meant for reusing the code in that class across multiple instances of that class. – Josh Jul 20 '16 at 20:16
  • 11
    The namespace solution looks more like a static class, not a singleton – Mihai Răducanu Nov 10 '16 at 14:35
  • 8
    A limitation of using a namespace as a singleton is that it cannot (to my knowledge) implement an interface. Would you agree with this @ryan – Gabe O'Leary Dec 3 '16 at 1:19
116

Since TS 2.0, we have the ability to define visibility modifiers on constructors, so now we can do singletons in TypeScript just like we are used to from other languages.

Example given:

class MyClass
{
    private static _instance: MyClass;

    private constructor()
    {
        //...
    }

    public static get Instance()
    {
        // Do you need arguments? Make it a regular method instead.
        return this._instance || (this._instance = new this());
    }
}

const myClassInstance = MyClass.Instance;
  • 1
    the constructor could be private? – Expert wanna be May 11 '16 at 1:27
  • 2
    @Expertwannabe This is now available in TS 2.0: github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/wiki/… – Alex Aug 1 '16 at 9:09
  • 2
    This is my preferred answer! Thank you. – Martin Majewski Dec 5 '16 at 13:14
  • 1
    fyi, the reason for the multiple instances was the node module resolution getting in the way. Thus, if you are creating a singleton in node make sure that that's considered. I ended up creating a node_modules folder under my src directory and putting the singleton in there. – webteckie Dec 17 '16 at 16:29
  • 2
    @KimchiMan If the project is ever used in a non-typescript environment e.g. imported into a JS project, the class will have no protection against further instantiation. It works in a pure TS environment only, but not for JS library development – Drenai Aug 24 '18 at 13:37
35

The best way I have found is:

class SingletonClass {

    private static _instance:SingletonClass = new SingletonClass();

    private _score:number = 0;

    constructor() {
        if(SingletonClass._instance){
            throw new Error("Error: Instantiation failed: Use SingletonClass.getInstance() instead of new.");
        }
        SingletonClass._instance = this;
    }

    public static getInstance():SingletonClass
    {
        return SingletonClass._instance;
    }

    public setScore(value:number):void
    {
        this._score = value;
    }

    public getScore():number
    {
        return this._score;
    }

    public addPoints(value:number):void
    {
        this._score += value;
    }

    public removePoints(value:number):void
    {
        this._score -= value;
    }

}

Here is how you use it:

var scoreManager = SingletonClass.getInstance();
scoreManager.setScore(10);
scoreManager.addPoints(1);
scoreManager.removePoints(2);
console.log( scoreManager.getScore() );

http://www.codebelt.com/typescript/typescript-singleton-pattern/

  • 3
    Why not make the constructor private? – Phil Mander Dec 15 '16 at 19:11
  • 3
    I think the post predates the ability to have private constructors in TS. github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/2341 – Trevor May 16 '17 at 16:00
  • I like this answer. Private constructors are great during development, but if a transpiled TS module is imported into a JS environment, the constructor can still be accessed. With this approach it's almost protected against misuse.... unless the SingletonClass['_instance'] is set to null/undefined – Drenai Aug 24 '18 at 13:41
14

The following approach creates a Singleton class that can be used exacly like a conventional class:

class Singleton {
    private static instance: Singleton;
    //Assign "new Singleton()" here to avoid lazy initialisation

    constructor() {
        if (Singleton.instance) {
            return Singleton.instance;
        }

        this. member = 0;
        Singleton.instance = this;
    }

    member: number;
}

Each new Singleton() operation will return the same instance. This can however be unexpected by the user.

The following example is more transparent to the user but requires a different usage:

class Singleton {
    private static instance: Singleton;
    //Assign "new Singleton()" here to avoid lazy initialisation

    constructor() {
        if (Singleton.instance) {
            throw new Error("Error - use Singleton.getInstance()");
        }
        this.member = 0;
    }

    static getInstance(): Singleton {
        Singleton.instance = Singleton.instance || new Singleton();
        return Singleton.instance;
    }

    member: number;
}

Usage: var obj = Singleton.getInstance();

13

I am surprised not to see the following pattern here, which actually looks very simple.

// shout.ts
class ShoutSingleton {
  helloWorld() { return 'hi'; }
}

export let Shout = new ShoutSingleton();

Usage

import { Shout } from './shout';
Shout.helloWorld();
  • I got the following error message: Exported variable 'Shout' has or is using private name 'ShoutSingleton '. – Twois May 8 '17 at 9:30
  • 3
    You have to export the class 'ShoutSingleton' too, and the error disappear. – Twois May 8 '17 at 9:37
  • Right, I am surprised as well. Why even bother with the class though? Singletons are supposed to hide their internal workings. Why not just export function helloWorld? – Oleg Dulin Jul 13 '17 at 16:50
  • see this github issue for more info: github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/6307 – Ore4444 Apr 20 '18 at 11:05
  • Guess nothing is stopping users from just creating a new Shout class though – dalore Jan 9 at 20:52
6

You can use class expressions for this (as of 1.6 I believe).

var x = new (class {
    /* ... lots of singleton logic ... */
    public someMethod() { ... }
})();

or with the name if your class needs to access its type internally

var x = new (class Singleton {
    /* ... lots of singleton logic ... */
    public someMethod(): Singleton { ... }
})();

Another option is to use a local class inside of your singleton using some static members

class Singleton {

    private static _instance;
    public static get instance() {

        class InternalSingleton {
            someMethod() { }

            //more singleton logic
        }

        if(!Singleton._instance) {
            Singleton._instance = new InternalSingleton();
        }

        return <InternalSingleton>Singleton._instance;
    }
}

var x = Singleton.instance;
x.someMethod();
4

Add the following 6 lines to any class to make it "Singleton". Use Alex answer if you prefer to get the instance through a property rather a method.

class MySingleton
{
    private constructor(){ /* ... */}
    private static _instance:MySingleton;
    public static getInstance():MySingleton
    {
        return this._instance||(this._instance = new this());
    };
}

Test example:

var test = MySingleton.getInstance(); // will create the first instance
var test2 = MySingleton.getInstance(); // will return the first instance
alert(test === test2); // true
  • What happens when I do new MySingleton() , say 5 times? does your code reserve a single instance? – Hlawuleka MAS Jan 8 '18 at 17:35
  • you should never use "new": as Alex wrote, the constructor should be "private", preventing to do "new MySingleton()". The right usage is to get an instance using MySingleton.getInstance(). AKAIK no constructor (like in my example) = a public empty constructor – Flavien Volken Jan 8 '18 at 21:10
  • "you should never use "new" - exactly my point:". But how does your implementation prevent me from doing so? I do not see anywhere where you have a private constructor in your class? – Hlawuleka MAS Jan 10 '18 at 14:02
  • @HlawulekaMAS I did not… I therefore I edited the answer, note that a private constructor was not possible before TS 2.0 (i.e. at the time I wrote the answer first) – Flavien Volken Jan 11 '18 at 7:44
  • "i.e. at the time I wrote the answer first" - Makes sense. Cool. – Hlawuleka MAS Jan 11 '18 at 8:35
1

This is probably the longest process to make a singleton in typescript, but in larger applications is the one that has worked better for me.

First you need a Singleton class in, let's say, "./utils/Singleton.ts":

module utils {
    export class Singleton {
        private _initialized: boolean;

        private _setSingleton(): void {
            if (this._initialized) throw Error('Singleton is already initialized.');
            this._initialized = true;
        }

        get setSingleton() { return this._setSingleton; }
    }
}

Now imagine you need a Router singleton "./navigation/Router.ts":

/// <reference path="../utils/Singleton.ts" />

module navigation {
    class RouterClass extends utils.Singleton {
        // NOTICE RouterClass extends from utils.Singleton
        // and that it isn't exportable.

        private _init(): void {
            // This method will be your "construtor" now,
            // to avoid double initialization, don't forget
            // the parent class setSingleton method!.
            this.setSingleton();

            // Initialization stuff.
        }

        // Expose _init method.
        get init { return this.init; }
    }

    // THIS IS IT!! Export a new RouterClass, that no
    // one can instantiate ever again!.
    export var Router: RouterClass = new RouterClass();
}

Nice!, now initialize or import wherever you need:

/// <reference path="./navigation/Router.ts" />

import router = navigation.Router;

router.init();
router.init(); // Throws error!.

The nice thing about doing singletons this way is that you still use all the beauty of typescript classes, it gives you nice intellisense, the singleton logic keeps someway separated and it's easy to remove if needed.

1

My solution for it:

export default class Modal {
    private static _instance : Modal = new Modal();

    constructor () {
        if (Modal._instance) 
            throw new Error("Use Modal.instance");
        Modal._instance = this;
    }

    static get instance () {
        return Modal._instance;
    }
}
  • 1
    In the constructor, instead of the exception you can return Modal._instance. This way, if you new that class, you get the existing object, not a new one. – Mihai Răducanu Nov 10 '16 at 14:40
1

In Typescript, one doesn't necessarily have to follow the new instance() Singleton methodology. An imported, constructor-less static class can work equally as well.

Consider:

export class YourSingleton {

   public static foo:bar;

   public static initialise(_initVars:any):void {
     YourSingleton.foo = _initvars.foo;
   }

   public static doThing():bar {
     return YourSingleton.foo
   }
}

You can import the class and refer to YourSingleton.doThing() in any other class. But remember, because this is a static class, it has no constructor so I usually use an intialise() method that is called from a class that imports the Singleton:

import {YourSingleton} from 'singleton.ts';

YourSingleton.initialise(params);
let _result:bar = YourSingleton.doThing();

Don't forget that in a static class, every method and variable needs to also be static so instead of this you would use the full class name YourSingleton.

1

i think maybe use generics be batter

class Singleton<T>{
    public static Instance<T>(c: {new(): T; }) : T{
        if (this._instance == null){
            this._instance = new c();
        }
        return this._instance;
    }

    private static _instance = null;
}

how to use

step1

class MapManager extends Singleton<MapManager>{
     //do something
     public init():void{ //do }
}

step2

    MapManager.Instance(MapManager).init();
1

You can also make use of the function Object.Freeze(). Its simple and easy:

class Singleton {

  instance: any = null;
  data: any = {} // store data in here

  constructor() {
    if (!this.instance) {
      this.instance = this;
    }
  }
}

const singleton: Singleton = new Singleton();
Object.freeze(singleton);

export default singleton;
0

Here is yet another way to do it with a more conventional javascript approach using an IFFE:

module App.Counter {
    export var Instance = (() => {
        var i = 0;
        return {
            increment: (): void => {
                i++;
            },
            getCount: (): number => {
                return i;
            }
        }
    })();
}

module App {
    export function countStuff() {
        App.Counter.Instance.increment();
        App.Counter.Instance.increment();
        alert(App.Counter.Instance.getCount());
    }
}

App.countStuff();

View a demo

  • What is the reason to add the Instance variable? You coukd simply put the variable and the functions directly under App.Counter. – fyaa Feb 1 '16 at 18:22
  • @fyaa Yes you could but the variable and the functions directly under App.Counter but I think this approach conforms better to the singleton pattern en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern. – JesperA Feb 18 '16 at 6:00
0

Another option is to use Symbols in your module. This way you can protect your class, also if the final user of your API is using normal Javascript:

let _instance = Symbol();
export default class Singleton {

    constructor(singletonToken) {
        if (singletonToken !== _instance) {
            throw new Error("Cannot instantiate directly.");
        }
        //Init your class
    }

    static get instance() {
        return this[_instance] || (this[_instance] = new Singleton(_singleton))
    }

    public myMethod():string {
        return "foo";
    }
}

Usage:

var str:string = Singleton.instance.myFoo();

If the user is using your compiled API js file, also will get an error if he try to instantiate manually your class:

// PLAIN JAVASCRIPT: 
var instance = new Singleton(); //Error the argument singletonToken !== _instance symbol
0
class MySingleton {
constructor(message) {
    alert('hello' + message);
}
private static instance: MySingleton;
private static instance2: MySingleton;

public static getSessionStorageInstance() {
    if (!MySingleton.instance) {
        MySingleton.instance = new MySingleton("world");
    }
    return MySingleton.instance;
}

public static getSessionStorageInstance2() {
    if (!MySingleton.instance2) {
        MySingleton.instance2 = new MySingleton("youu");
    }
    return MySingleton.instance2;
 }
}

 const a: MySingleton = MySingleton.getSessionStorageInstance();
 const b: MySingleton = MySingleton.getSessionStorageInstance2();

 alert(a === b)
-1
namespace MySingleton {
  interface IMySingleton {
      doSomething(): void;
  }
  class MySingleton implements IMySingleton {
      private usePrivate() { }
      doSomething() {
          this.usePrivate();
      }
  }
  export var Instance: IMySingleton = new MySingleton();
}

This way we can apply an interface, unlike in Ryan Cavanaugh's accepted answer.

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