So I'm trying to get some code that is written for gcc to compile on Visual Studio 2008. I have a problem that I have narrowed down to this:

class value_t
{
public:
  typedef std::deque<value_t>         sequence_t;
  typedef sequence_t::iterator        iterator;
};

This code fails:

1>cpptest.cpp
1>c:\program files\microsoft visual studio 9.0\vc\include\deque(518) : error C2027: use of undefined type 'value_t'
1>        c:\temp\cpptest\cpptest.cpp(10) : see declaration of 'value_t'
1>        c:\temp\cpptest\cpptest.cpp(13) : see reference to class template instantiation 'std::deque<_Ty>' being compiled
1>        with
1>        [
1>            _Ty=value_t
1>        ]
1>c:\program files\microsoft visual studio 9.0\vc\include\deque(518) : error C2027: use of undefined type 'value_t'
1>        c:\temp\cpptest\cpptest.cpp(10) : see declaration of 'value_t'

However when I try this with std::vector, it compiles fine:

class value_t
{
public:
  typedef std::vector<value_t>        sequence_t;
  typedef sequence_t::iterator        iterator;
};

What's wrong? I have tried adding 'typename' everywhere I can think of, but at this point in time I'm thinking it's just a bug in the Dinkumware STL. Can anyone explain what's happening, and/or offer a solution? Thanks.

  • 1
    Does "everywhere you can think of" include typedef typename sequence_t::iterator iterator;? – Stephen Jun 10 '10 at 18:46
  • You might try a forward declaration before the class declaration. i.e. class value_t; – Amardeep AC9MF Jun 10 '10 at 18:46
  • Well this always happens - right after I post this question, I find the magic combination in google to give me something relevant. See gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=295828 which discusses this topic; still doesn't offer a solution. Can someone confirm that using deque in this situation is non-standard? Is there a way to get this to work without changing the <deque> file? – Roel Jun 10 '10 at 18:46
  • @Stephen: yes, but: "error C2899: typename cannot be used outside a template declaration". – Roel Jun 10 '10 at 18:48
  • 1
    typename doesn't have anything to do with it - the above example isn't a template, so there can't even be a problem with dependent types in the first place. – Georg Fritzsche Jun 10 '10 at 18:53
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Its undefined behavior. See this link on c.l.c++.moderated

Snip from Daniel K's answer :-

the C++ standard (both C++03 and C++0x) says that what you are trying causes undefined behaviour, see [lib.res.on.functions]/2:

"In particular, the effects are undefined in the following cases: [..] — if an incomplete type (3.9) is used as a template argument when instantiating a template component."

  • Thank you, that thread explains it in the most detail I could ever want. Guess I'll have to change the code. – Roel Jun 10 '10 at 19:00

I think the problem is that value_t is an incomplete type until you reach the end of the definition. Trying to use an incomplete type as the template parameter for a standard container isn't really supposed to work. It can/will happen to work under some circumstances, but if it failed with all standard container types, that still wouldn't signal any kind of bug. The standard requires it to be a complete type, so if it's not, you get what you get -- it probably should fail consistently, but if it happens to work, there's nothing wrong with that.

You are trying to use a class within itself in a template. How does it resolve this? I don't know that I have ever tried to do this, but is this even possible? I don't know why it works for std::vector, but my assumption is that it is wrong. You are defining a class, and using that definition in the definition. Seems wrong to me. Good luck on this one, I'll be interested to see some deeper answers myself...

  • It works for std::vector, and on gcc this code compiles fine too. I guess as long as sizeof(class) is known that's enough. It tripped up the people in the link I posted in the comment too, apparently. I've been doing this with vector for years - just a coincidence that it worked then, I guess. – Roel Jun 10 '10 at 18:57

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