12

To get ggplot to plot minor breaks correctly on a logarithmic scale, I had to do this thing:

faceplant1 <- function(x) {
    return (c(x[1]*10^.25, x[2]/10^.25))
}
faceplant2 <- function(x) {
    return (rep(seq(1,9),5)*rep(10^seq(-6,-2), each=9))
}
ggplot(mydata, aes(x=myseries)) +
    geom_density() +
    scale_x_log10(limits=c(1e-6, 1e-1),
                  breaks=10^seq(-6,-1),
                  minor_breaks=trans_breaks(faceplant1, faceplant2, n=45))

Is there a simpler way to achieve this?

The end result should look like:

Plot with log minor breaks

  • Not clear, you want the minor breaks also on log scale as per major, or you want the minor breaks on 'linear' scale within log scale major breaks? – Umaomamaomao May 12 '15 at 5:39
  • The latter, I think; as that's what's depicted in the graph. – Reinderien May 12 '15 at 5:40
  • 3
    I love your function-naming convention ;o) – Emmet Sep 29 '15 at 22:53
10

Here's my solution to that problem:

library(ggplot2)

log10_minor_break = function (...){
  function(x) {
    minx         = floor(min(log10(x), na.rm=T))-1;
    maxx         = ceiling(max(log10(x), na.rm=T))+1;
    n_major      = maxx-minx+1;
    major_breaks = seq(minx, maxx, by=1)
    minor_breaks = 
      rep(log10(seq(1, 9, by=1)), times = n_major)+
      rep(major_breaks, each = 9)
    return(10^(minor_breaks))
  }
}

mydata = data.frame(myseries = 10^(rnorm(1e4, mean=0, sd=0.5)))

myplot = 
  ggplot(mydata, aes(x=myseries))+
  geom_density()+
  scale_x_log10(minor_breaks=log10_minor_break())+
  theme(panel.grid.major.x = element_line(size=1.0),
        panel.grid.minor.x = element_line(size=2))

myplot

It is very similar to what you've already done but applies generally. And a minor improvement: it would expand the minor breaks below 1e-6 and above1e-1 in your example.

I have started from looking at the function trans_break and reduced it to its most fundamental element.

It is also worth considering the annotation_logticks() function:

myplot+annotation_logticks(side="b")
  • This does not seem to have every major tick labeled (e.g. 0.01 - 100). How do you get every major tick labeled? – David S Sep 6 '16 at 19:55
  • I'd think that making sure all major ticks are labeled would involve the breaks parameter in the scale_x_log10 function. Perhaps writing a function to ensure that all major breaks are included... – gvrocha Dec 14 '16 at 23:51
  • Please see my adaptation in a separate answer, if you have any suggestions. – Reinderien Oct 9 '17 at 15:43
4

Years later: I have adapted @gvrocha's answer to be (even more) generic.

log_breaks = function(maj, radix=10) {
  function(x) {
    minx         = floor(min(logb(x,radix), na.rm=T)) - 1
    maxx         = ceiling(max(logb(x,radix), na.rm=T)) + 1
    n_major      = maxx - minx + 1
    major_breaks = seq(minx, maxx, by=1)
    if (maj) {
      breaks = major_breaks
    } else {
      steps = logb(1:(radix-1),radix)
      breaks = rep(steps, times=n_major) +
               rep(major_breaks, each=radix-1)
    }
    radix^breaks
  }
}
scale_x_log_eng = function(..., radix=10) {
  scale_x_continuous(...,
                     trans=log_trans(radix),
                     breaks=log_breaks(TRUE, radix),
                     minor_breaks=log_breaks(FALSE, radix))
}
scale_y_log_eng = function(..., radix=10) {
  scale_y_continuous(...,
                     trans=log_trans(radix),
                     breaks=log_breaks(TRUE, radix),
                     minor_breaks=log_breaks(FALSE, radix))
}

Then usage is more elegant:

ggplot(...) +
   geom_line() +
   scale_x_log_eng() +
   scale_y_log_eng()

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.