I am looking for color space converter from RGB to HSV, specifically for the range 0 to 255 for both color spaces.

12 Answers 12

up vote 114 down vote accepted

I've used these for a long time - no idea where they came from at this point... Note that the inputs and outputs, except for the angle in degrees, are in the range of 0 to 1.0.

NOTE: this code does no real sanity checking on inputs. Proceed with caution!

typedef struct {
    double r;       // a fraction between 0 and 1
    double g;       // a fraction between 0 and 1
    double b;       // a fraction between 0 and 1
} rgb;

typedef struct {
    double h;       // angle in degrees
    double s;       // a fraction between 0 and 1
    double v;       // a fraction between 0 and 1
} hsv;

static hsv   rgb2hsv(rgb in);
static rgb   hsv2rgb(hsv in);

hsv rgb2hsv(rgb in)
{
    hsv         out;
    double      min, max, delta;

    min = in.r < in.g ? in.r : in.g;
    min = min  < in.b ? min  : in.b;

    max = in.r > in.g ? in.r : in.g;
    max = max  > in.b ? max  : in.b;

    out.v = max;                                // v
    delta = max - min;
    if (delta < 0.00001)
    {
        out.s = 0;
        out.h = 0; // undefined, maybe nan?
        return out;
    }
    if( max > 0.0 ) { // NOTE: if Max is == 0, this divide would cause a crash
        out.s = (delta / max);                  // s
    } else {
        // if max is 0, then r = g = b = 0              
        // s = 0, h is undefined
        out.s = 0.0;
        out.h = NAN;                            // its now undefined
        return out;
    }
    if( in.r >= max )                           // > is bogus, just keeps compilor happy
        out.h = ( in.g - in.b ) / delta;        // between yellow & magenta
    else
    if( in.g >= max )
        out.h = 2.0 + ( in.b - in.r ) / delta;  // between cyan & yellow
    else
        out.h = 4.0 + ( in.r - in.g ) / delta;  // between magenta & cyan

    out.h *= 60.0;                              // degrees

    if( out.h < 0.0 )
        out.h += 360.0;

    return out;
}


rgb hsv2rgb(hsv in)
{
    double      hh, p, q, t, ff;
    long        i;
    rgb         out;

    if(in.s <= 0.0) {       // < is bogus, just shuts up warnings
        out.r = in.v;
        out.g = in.v;
        out.b = in.v;
        return out;
    }
    hh = in.h;
    if(hh >= 360.0) hh = 0.0;
    hh /= 60.0;
    i = (long)hh;
    ff = hh - i;
    p = in.v * (1.0 - in.s);
    q = in.v * (1.0 - (in.s * ff));
    t = in.v * (1.0 - (in.s * (1.0 - ff)));

    switch(i) {
    case 0:
        out.r = in.v;
        out.g = t;
        out.b = p;
        break;
    case 1:
        out.r = q;
        out.g = in.v;
        out.b = p;
        break;
    case 2:
        out.r = p;
        out.g = in.v;
        out.b = t;
        break;

    case 3:
        out.r = p;
        out.g = q;
        out.b = in.v;
        break;
    case 4:
        out.r = t;
        out.g = p;
        out.b = in.v;
        break;
    case 5:
    default:
        out.r = in.v;
        out.g = p;
        out.b = q;
        break;
    }
    return out;     
}
  • 11
    @Stargazer712 If you do the math,it should be ==, but if you use that you may get a complaint about comparing floats. While theoretically it's impossible for it to be >, using ">=" instead of "==" shuts down the compiler error that I get on the Mac using llvm/Xcode, – David H Jun 13 '13 at 20:45
  • 3
    @Gerard out is in degrees. 60 is 1/6th of a full circle. This is not radians. – David H Jun 23 '15 at 14:46
  • 3
    The reason for the >= and compiler error is because double == double is invalid and illegal in most compilers. Floating point arithmetic and floating point storage means that two values can be equal in approximate value, but not equal in stored value even though formulaically they are the same. You're supposed to do abs(double_a - double_b) <= epsilon where epsilon is some value, typically 1e-4. – Joachim Brandon LeBlanc Mar 18 '16 at 19:53
  • 1
    For rgb2hsv, where in.r >= max, why isn't the code using the mod operator? Shouldn't the out.h be calculated as "out.h = ((in.g - in.b) / delta) % 6;" ? – craigrf May 25 '16 at 16:59
  • 1
    @JoachimBrandonLeBlanc: "double == double is invalid and illegal in most compilers" That is not true. Comparing two floating-point values for equality is completely well-defined and a legal thing to do. No mainstream and/or compliant compiler will prevent you from doing it. The problem is that you may not get the answer you actually wanted, and likely intended to perform a looser comparison. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 18 at 23:48

You can also try this code without floats (faster but less accurate):

typedef struct RgbColor
{
    unsigned char r;
    unsigned char g;
    unsigned char b;
} RgbColor;

typedef struct HsvColor
{
    unsigned char h;
    unsigned char s;
    unsigned char v;
} HsvColor;

RgbColor HsvToRgb(HsvColor hsv)
{
    RgbColor rgb;
    unsigned char region, remainder, p, q, t;

    if (hsv.s == 0)
    {
        rgb.r = hsv.v;
        rgb.g = hsv.v;
        rgb.b = hsv.v;
        return rgb;
    }

    region = hsv.h / 43;
    remainder = (hsv.h - (region * 43)) * 6; 

    p = (hsv.v * (255 - hsv.s)) >> 8;
    q = (hsv.v * (255 - ((hsv.s * remainder) >> 8))) >> 8;
    t = (hsv.v * (255 - ((hsv.s * (255 - remainder)) >> 8))) >> 8;

    switch (region)
    {
        case 0:
            rgb.r = hsv.v; rgb.g = t; rgb.b = p;
            break;
        case 1:
            rgb.r = q; rgb.g = hsv.v; rgb.b = p;
            break;
        case 2:
            rgb.r = p; rgb.g = hsv.v; rgb.b = t;
            break;
        case 3:
            rgb.r = p; rgb.g = q; rgb.b = hsv.v;
            break;
        case 4:
            rgb.r = t; rgb.g = p; rgb.b = hsv.v;
            break;
        default:
            rgb.r = hsv.v; rgb.g = p; rgb.b = q;
            break;
    }

    return rgb;
}

HsvColor RgbToHsv(RgbColor rgb)
{
    HsvColor hsv;
    unsigned char rgbMin, rgbMax;

    rgbMin = rgb.r < rgb.g ? (rgb.r < rgb.b ? rgb.r : rgb.b) : (rgb.g < rgb.b ? rgb.g : rgb.b);
    rgbMax = rgb.r > rgb.g ? (rgb.r > rgb.b ? rgb.r : rgb.b) : (rgb.g > rgb.b ? rgb.g : rgb.b);

    hsv.v = rgbMax;
    if (hsv.v == 0)
    {
        hsv.h = 0;
        hsv.s = 0;
        return hsv;
    }

    hsv.s = 255 * long(rgbMax - rgbMin) / hsv.v;
    if (hsv.s == 0)
    {
        hsv.h = 0;
        return hsv;
    }

    if (rgbMax == rgb.r)
        hsv.h = 0 + 43 * (rgb.g - rgb.b) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);
    else if (rgbMax == rgb.g)
        hsv.h = 85 + 43 * (rgb.b - rgb.r) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);
    else
        hsv.h = 171 + 43 * (rgb.r - rgb.g) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);

    return hsv;
}

Note that this algorithm uses 0x00 - 0xFF as it's range (not 0-360).
(Source)

  • 6
    You can convert all 16,777,216 possible RGB colors to HSV and back again to RGB. Unfortunately, using this algorithm you will find that some colors will not roundtrip well. Perhaps they perceptually look about the same but numerically there is a substantial difference, e.g. (0, 237, 11) will roundtrip to (0, 237, 0) etc. This is not the case when using David H's algorithm based on floating point calculations. – Martin Liversage Jul 23 '13 at 9:02
  • 3
    @rightaway717 - this gives me the full range, maybe you're using 0-360 as the range? This algorithm (thankfully) uses 0x00 - 0xFF as it's range – Anne Quinn Sep 11 '16 at 12:38
  • @AnneQuinn correct! I expected it to be 0-360, but I just didn't have enough passion to figure out what was wrong, when I saw that the accepted answer just worked. I think Leszek should've mentioned hue range in the answer, though thank him for posting it anyways. – rightaway717 Sep 11 '16 at 12:47

I wrote this in HLSL for our rendering engine, it has no conditions in it:

    float3  HSV2RGB( float3 _HSV )
    {
        _HSV.x = fmod( 100.0 + _HSV.x, 1.0 );                                       // Ensure [0,1[

        float   HueSlice = 6.0 * _HSV.x;                                            // In [0,6[
        float   HueSliceInteger = floor( HueSlice );
        float   HueSliceInterpolant = HueSlice - HueSliceInteger;                   // In [0,1[ for each hue slice

        float3  TempRGB = float3(   _HSV.z * (1.0 - _HSV.y),
                                    _HSV.z * (1.0 - _HSV.y * HueSliceInterpolant),
                                    _HSV.z * (1.0 - _HSV.y * (1.0 - HueSliceInterpolant)) );

        // The idea here to avoid conditions is to notice that the conversion code can be rewritten:
        //    if      ( var_i == 0 ) { R = V         ; G = TempRGB.z ; B = TempRGB.x }
        //    else if ( var_i == 2 ) { R = TempRGB.x ; G = V         ; B = TempRGB.z }
        //    else if ( var_i == 4 ) { R = TempRGB.z ; G = TempRGB.x ; B = V     }
        // 
        //    else if ( var_i == 1 ) { R = TempRGB.y ; G = V         ; B = TempRGB.x }
        //    else if ( var_i == 3 ) { R = TempRGB.x ; G = TempRGB.y ; B = V     }
        //    else if ( var_i == 5 ) { R = V         ; G = TempRGB.x ; B = TempRGB.y }
        //
        // This shows several things:
        //  . A separation between even and odd slices
        //  . If slices (0,2,4) and (1,3,5) can be rewritten as basically being slices (0,1,2) then
        //      the operation simply amounts to performing a "rotate right" on the RGB components
        //  . The base value to rotate is either (V, B, R) for even slices or (G, V, R) for odd slices
        //
        float   IsOddSlice = fmod( HueSliceInteger, 2.0 );                          // 0 if even (slices 0, 2, 4), 1 if odd (slices 1, 3, 5)
        float   ThreeSliceSelector = 0.5 * (HueSliceInteger - IsOddSlice);          // (0, 1, 2) corresponding to slices (0, 2, 4) and (1, 3, 5)

        float3  ScrollingRGBForEvenSlices = float3( _HSV.z, TempRGB.zx );           // (V, Temp Blue, Temp Red) for even slices (0, 2, 4)
        float3  ScrollingRGBForOddSlices = float3( TempRGB.y, _HSV.z, TempRGB.x );  // (Temp Green, V, Temp Red) for odd slices (1, 3, 5)
        float3  ScrollingRGB = lerp( ScrollingRGBForEvenSlices, ScrollingRGBForOddSlices, IsOddSlice );

        float   IsNotFirstSlice = saturate( ThreeSliceSelector );                   // 1 if NOT the first slice (true for slices 1 and 2)
        float   IsNotSecondSlice = saturate( ThreeSliceSelector-1.0 );              // 1 if NOT the first or second slice (true only for slice 2)

        return  lerp( ScrollingRGB.xyz, lerp( ScrollingRGB.zxy, ScrollingRGB.yzx, IsNotSecondSlice ), IsNotFirstSlice );    // Make the RGB rotate right depending on final slice index
    }
  • 1
    Do you have the other way conversion (RGB2HSV)? using the same approach? – Carlos Barcellos Apr 18 at 23:44

this should be on here: it works anyway. And it looks good compared to the above ones.

hlsl code

        float3 Hue(float H)
        {
            half R = abs(H * 6 - 3) - 1;
            half G = 2 - abs(H * 6 - 2);
            half B = 2 - abs(H * 6 - 4);
            return saturate(half3(R,G,B));
        }

        half4 HSVtoRGB(in half3 HSV)
        {
            return half4(((Hue(HSV.x) - 1) * HSV.y + 1) * HSV.z,1);
        }

float3 is 16 bit precision vector3 data type, i.e. float3 hue() is returns a data type (x,y,z) e.g. (r,g,b), half is same with half precision, 8bit, a float4 is (r,g,b,a) 4 values.

Here's a C implementation based on Agoston's Computer Graphics and Geometric Modeling: Implementation and Algorithms p. 304, with H ∈ [0, 360] and S,V ∈ [0, 1].

#include <math.h>

typedef struct {
    double r;       // ∈ [0, 1]
    double g;       // ∈ [0, 1]
    double b;       // ∈ [0, 1]
} rgb;

typedef struct {
    double h;       // ∈ [0, 360]
    double s;       // ∈ [0, 1]
    double v;       // ∈ [0, 1]
} hsv;

rgb hsv2rgb(hsv HSV)
{
    rgb RGB;
    double H = HSV.h, S = HSV.s, V = HSV.v,
            P, Q, T,
            fract;

    (H == 360.)?(H = 0.):(H /= 60.);
    fract = H - floor(H);

    P = V*(1. - S);
    Q = V*(1. - S*fract);
    T = V*(1. - S*(1. - fract));

    if      (0. <= H && H < 1.)
        RGB = (rgb){.r = V, .g = T, .b = P};
    else if (1. <= H && H < 2.)
        RGB = (rgb){.r = Q, .g = V, .b = P};
    else if (2. <= H && H < 3.)
        RGB = (rgb){.r = P, .g = V, .b = T};
    else if (3. <= H && H < 4.)
        RGB = (rgb){.r = P, .g = Q, .b = V};
    else if (4. <= H && H < 5.)
        RGB = (rgb){.r = T, .g = P, .b = V};
    else if (5. <= H && H < 6.)
        RGB = (rgb){.r = V, .g = P, .b = Q};
    else
        RGB = (rgb){.r = 0., .g = 0., .b = 0.};

    return RGB;
}

@fins's answer has an overflow issue on Arduio as you turn the saturation down. Here it is with some values converted to int to prevent that.

typedef struct RgbColor
{
    unsigned char r;
    unsigned char g;
    unsigned char b;
} RgbColor;

typedef struct HsvColor
{
    unsigned char h;
    unsigned char s;
    unsigned char v;
} HsvColor;

RgbColor HsvToRgb(HsvColor hsv)
{
    RgbColor rgb;
    unsigned char region, p, q, t;
    unsigned int h, s, v, remainder;

    if (hsv.s == 0)
    {
        rgb.r = hsv.v;
        rgb.g = hsv.v;
        rgb.b = hsv.v;
        return rgb;
    }

    // converting to 16 bit to prevent overflow
    h = hsv.h;
    s = hsv.s;
    v = hsv.v;

    region = h / 43;
    remainder = (h - (region * 43)) * 6; 

    p = (v * (255 - s)) >> 8;
    q = (v * (255 - ((s * remainder) >> 8))) >> 8;
    t = (v * (255 - ((s * (255 - remainder)) >> 8))) >> 8;

    switch (region)
    {
        case 0:
            rgb.r = v;
            rgb.g = t;
            rgb.b = p;
            break;
        case 1:
            rgb.r = q;
            rgb.g = v;
            rgb.b = p;
            break;
        case 2:
            rgb.r = p;
            rgb.g = v;
            rgb.b = t;
            break;
        case 3:
            rgb.r = p;
            rgb.g = q;
            rgb.b = v;
            break;
        case 4:
            rgb.r = t;
            rgb.g = p;
            rgb.b = v;
            break;
        default:
            rgb.r = v;
            rgb.g = p;
            rgb.b = q;
            break;
    }

    return rgb;
}

HsvColor RgbToHsv(RgbColor rgb)
{
    HsvColor hsv;
    unsigned char rgbMin, rgbMax;

    rgbMin = rgb.r < rgb.g ? (rgb.r < rgb.b ? rgb.r : rgb.b) : (rgb.g < rgb.b ? rgb.g : rgb.b);
    rgbMax = rgb.r > rgb.g ? (rgb.r > rgb.b ? rgb.r : rgb.b) : (rgb.g > rgb.b ? rgb.g : rgb.b);

    hsv.v = rgbMax;
    if (hsv.v == 0)
    {
        hsv.h = 0;
        hsv.s = 0;
        return hsv;
    }

    hsv.s = 255 * ((long)(rgbMax - rgbMin)) / hsv.v;
    if (hsv.s == 0)
    {
        hsv.h = 0;
        return hsv;
    }

    if (rgbMax == rgb.r)
        hsv.h = 0 + 43 * (rgb.g - rgb.b) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);
    else if (rgbMax == rgb.g)
        hsv.h = 85 + 43 * (rgb.b - rgb.r) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);
    else
        hsv.h = 171 + 43 * (rgb.r - rgb.g) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);

    return hsv;
}

This isn't C, but it's certainly does work. All the other methods I see here work by casing everything into parts of a hexagon, and approximating "angles" from that. By instead starting with a different equation using cosines, and solving for h s and v, you get a lot nicer relationship between hsv and rgb, and tweening becomes smoother (at the cost of it being way slower).

Assume everything is floating point. If r g and b go from 0 to 1, h goes from 0 to 2pi, v goes from 0 to 4/3, and s goes from 0 to 2/3.

The following code is written in Lua. It's easily translatable into anything else.

local hsv do
    hsv         ={}
    local atan2 =math.atan2
    local cos   =math.cos
    local sin   =math.sin

    function hsv.fromrgb(r,b,g)
        local c=r+g+b
        if c<1e-4 then
            return 0,2/3,0
        else
            local p=2*(b*b+g*g+r*r-g*r-b*g-b*r)^0.5
            local h=atan2(b-g,(2*r-b-g)/3^0.5)
            local s=p/(c+p)
            local v=(c+p)/3
            return h,s,v
        end
    end

    function hsv.torgb(h,s,v)
        local r=v*(1+s*(cos(h)-1))
        local g=v*(1+s*(cos(h-2.09439)-1))
        local b=v*(1+s*(cos(h+2.09439)-1))
        return r,g,b
    end

    function hsv.tween(h0,s0,v0,h1,s1,v1,t)
        local dh=(h1-h0+3.14159)%6.28318-3.14159
        local h=h0+t*dh
        local s=s0+t*(s1-s0)
        local v=v0+t*(v1-v0)
        return h,s,v
    end
end

GLSL Shader version based on Patapoms answer:

vec3 HSV2RGB( vec3 hsv )
{
    hsv.x = mod( 100.0 + hsv.x, 1.0 ); // Ensure [0,1[
    float   HueSlice = 6.0 * hsv.x; // In [0,6[
    float   HueSliceInteger = floor( HueSlice );
    float   HueSliceInterpolant = HueSlice - HueSliceInteger; // In [0,1[ for each hue slice
    vec3  TempRGB = vec3(   hsv.z * (1.0 - hsv.y), hsv.z * (1.0 - hsv.y * HueSliceInterpolant), hsv.z * (1.0 - hsv.y * (1.0 - HueSliceInterpolant)) );
    float   IsOddSlice = mod( HueSliceInteger, 2.0 ); // 0 if even (slices 0, 2, 4), 1 if odd (slices 1, 3, 5)
    float   ThreeSliceSelector = 0.5 * (HueSliceInteger - IsOddSlice); // (0, 1, 2) corresponding to slices (0, 2, 4) and (1, 3, 5)
    vec3  ScrollingRGBForEvenSlices = vec3( hsv.z, TempRGB.zx );           // (V, Temp Blue, Temp Red) for even slices (0, 2, 4)
    vec3  ScrollingRGBForOddSlices = vec3( TempRGB.y, hsv.z, TempRGB.x );  // (Temp Green, V, Temp Red) for odd slices (1, 3, 5)
    vec3  ScrollingRGB = mix( ScrollingRGBForEvenSlices, ScrollingRGBForOddSlices, IsOddSlice );
    float   IsNotFirstSlice = clamp( ThreeSliceSelector, 0.0,1.0 );                   // 1 if NOT the first slice (true for slices 1 and 2)
    float   IsNotSecondSlice = clamp( ThreeSliceSelector-1.0, 0.0,1. );              // 1 if NOT the first or second slice (true only for slice 2)
    return  mix( ScrollingRGB.xyz, mix( ScrollingRGB.zxy, ScrollingRGB.yzx, IsNotSecondSlice ), IsNotFirstSlice );    // Make the RGB rotate right depending on final slice index
}

This link has formulas for what you want. Then it's a matter of performance (numerical techniques) if you want it fast.

Here's one which i just wrote this morning based on pretty much the same math as above:

/* math adapted from: http://www.rapidtables.com/convert/color/rgb-to-hsl.htm
 * reasonably optimized for speed, without going crazy */
void rgb_to_hsv (int r, int g, int b, float *r_h, float *r_s, float *r_v) {
  float rp, gp, bp, cmax, cmin, delta, l;
  int cmaxwhich, cminwhich;

  rp = ((float) r) / 255;
  gp = ((float) g) / 255;
  bp = ((float) b) / 255;

  //debug ("rgb=%d,%d,%d rgbprime=%f,%f,%f", r, g, b, rp, gp, bp);

  cmax = rp;
  cmaxwhich = 0; /* faster comparison afterwards */
  if (gp > cmax) { cmax = gp; cmaxwhich = 1; }
  if (bp > cmax) { cmax = bp; cmaxwhich = 2; }
  cmin = rp;
  cminwhich = 0;
  if (gp < cmin) { cmin = gp; cminwhich = 1; }
  if (bp < cmin) { cmin = bp; cminwhich = 2; }

  //debug ("cmin=%f,cmax=%f", cmin, cmax);
  delta = cmax - cmin;

  /* HUE */
  if (delta == 0) {
    *r_h = 0;
  } else {
    switch (cmaxwhich) {
      case 0: /* cmax == rp */
        *r_h = HUE_ANGLE * (fmod ((gp - bp) / delta, 6));
      break;

      case 1: /* cmax == gp */
        *r_h = HUE_ANGLE * (((bp - rp) / delta) + 2);
      break;

      case 2: /* cmax == bp */
        *r_h = HUE_ANGLE * (((rp - gp) / delta) + 4);
      break;
    }
    if (*r_h < 0)
      *r_h += 360;
  }

  /* LIGHTNESS/VALUE */
  //l = (cmax + cmin) / 2;
  *r_v = cmax;

  /* SATURATION */
  /*if (delta == 0) {
    *r_s = 0;
  } else {
    *r_s = delta / (1 - fabs (1 - (2 * (l - 1))));
  }*/
  if (cmax == 0) {
    *r_s = 0;
  } else {
    *r_s = delta / cmax;
  }
  //debug ("rgb=%d,%d,%d ---> hsv=%f,%f,%f", r, g, b, *r_h, *r_s, *r_v);
}


void hsv_to_rgb (float h, float s, float v, int *r_r, int *r_g, int *r_b) {
  if (h > 360)
    h -= 360;
  if (h < 0)
    h += 360;
  h = CLAMP (h, 0, 360);
  s = CLAMP (s, 0, 1);
  v = CLAMP (v, 0, 1);
  float c = v * s;
  float x = c * (1 - fabsf (fmod ((h / HUE_ANGLE), 2) - 1));
  float m = v - c;
  float rp, gp, bp;
  int a = h / 60;

  //debug ("h=%f, a=%d", h, a);

  switch (a) {
    case 0:
      rp = c;
      gp = x;
      bp = 0;
    break;

    case 1:
      rp = x;
      gp = c;
      bp = 0;
    break;

    case 2:
      rp = 0;
      gp = c;
      bp = x;
    break;

    case 3:
      rp = 0;
      gp = x;
      bp = c;
    break;

    case 4:
      rp = x;
      gp = 0;
      bp = c;
    break;

    default: // case 5:
      rp = c;
      gp = 0;
      bp = x;
    break;
  }

  *r_r = (rp + m) * 255;
  *r_g = (gp + m) * 255;
  *r_b = (bp + m) * 255;

  //debug ("hsv=%f,%f,%f, ---> rgb=%d,%d,%d", h, s, v, *r_r, *r_g, *r_b);
}
  • missing symbol definitions for CLAMP and HUE_ANGLE – Dmitry Aug 11 at 6:37
How is this algorithm-

void RGB_to_HSV(float R, float G, float B){
    float H, S, V;
    float Max, Min;
    Max = max(R, G, B);
    Min= min(R, G, B);
    V= Max;

if(Max == 0){
  s=0;
}
else{
  s= Max-Min/Max;
}
if(s==0){
  H = undefined;
}
else{
  if(R == Max){
  H = (G-B)*60/Max-Min;
  if(H<0)
   H+ = 360;
}
elseif(G==Max){
    H = (B-R)*(60+120)/Max-Min;
}
else{
   H = (R-G)*(60+240)/Max-Min;
}
}
  printf('H S V');
}

I created a possibly faster implementation by using a 0-6 range of values for Hue (avoiding the division), and grouping the cases int two categories:

#include <math.h>
#include <float.h>

void fromRGBtoHSV(float rgb[], float hsv[])
{
//    for(int i=0; i<3; ++i)
//        rgb[i] = max(0.0f, min(1.0f, rgb[i]));

     hsv[0] = 0.0f;
     hsv[2] = max(rgb[0], max(rgb[1], rgb[2]));
     const float delta = hsv[2] - min(rgb[0], min(rgb[1], rgb[2]));

     if (delta < FLT_MIN)
         hsv[1] = 0.0f;
     else
     {
         hsv[1] = delta / hsv[2];
         if (rgb[0] >= hsv[2])
         {
             hsv[0] = (rgb[1] - rgb[2]) / delta;
             if (hsv[0] < 0.0f)
                 hsv[0] += 6.0f;
         }
         else if (rgb[1] >= hsv[2])
             hsv[0] = 2.0f + (rgb[2] - rgb[0]) / delta;
         else
             hsv[0] = 4.0f + (rgb[0] - rgb[1]) / delta;
     }    
}

void fromHSVtoRGB(const float hsv[], float rgb[])
{
    if(hsv[1] < FLT_MIN)
        rgb[0] = rgb[1] = rgb[2] = hsv[2];
    else
    {
        const float h = hsv[0];
        const int i = (int)h;
        const float f = h - i;
        const float p = hsv[2] * (1.0f - hsv[1]);

        if (i & 1) {
            const float q = hsv[2] * (1.0f - (hsv[1] * f));
            switch(i) {
            case 1:
                rgb[0] = q;
                rgb[1] = hsv[2];
                rgb[2] = p;
                break;
            case 3:
                rgb[0] = p;
                rgb[1] = q;
                rgb[2] = hsv[2];
                break;
            default:
                rgb[0] = hsv[2];
                rgb[1] = p;
                rgb[2] = q;
                break;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            const float t = hsv[2] * (1.0f - (hsv[1] * (1.0f - f)));
            switch(i) {
            case 0:
                rgb[0] = hsv[2];
                rgb[1] = t;
                rgb[2] = p;
                break;
            case 2:
                rgb[0] = p;
                rgb[1] = hsv[2];
                rgb[2] = t;
                break;
            default:
                rgb[0] = t;
                rgb[1] = p;
                rgb[2] = hsv[2];
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

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