26

In this answer I define a template based on the type's is_arithmetic property:

template<typename T> enable_if_t<is_arithmetic<T>::value, string> stringify(T t){
    return to_string(t);
}
template<typename T> enable_if_t<!is_arithmetic<T>::value, string> stringify(T t){
    return static_cast<ostringstream&>(ostringstream() << t).str();
}

dyp suggests that rather than the is_arithmetic property of the type, that whether to_string is defined for the type be the template selection criteria. This is clearly desirable, but I don't know a way to say:

If std::to_string is not defined then use the ostringstream overload.

Declaring the to_string criteria is simple:

template<typename T> decltype(to_string(T{})) stringify(T t){
    return to_string(t);
}

It's the opposite of that criteria that I can't figure out how to construct. This obviously doesn't work, but hopefully it conveys what I'm trying to construct:

template<typename T> enable_if_t<!decltype(to_string(T{})::value, string> (T t){
    return static_cast<ostringstream&>(ostringstream() << t).str();
}
14

Freshly voted into the library fundamentals TS at last week's committee meeting:

template<class T>
using to_string_t = decltype(std::to_string(std::declval<T>()));

template<class T>
using has_to_string = std::experimental::is_detected<to_string_t, T>;

Then tag dispatch and/or SFINAE on has_to_string to your heart's content.

You can consult the current working draft of the TS on how is_detected and friends can be implemented. It's rather similar to can_apply in @Yakk's answer.

  • Is @Yakk on the committee? – Barry May 12 '15 at 17:30
  • @Barry You'll have to ask him :) – T.C. May 12 '15 at 17:38
  • @T.C. Does this mean that I could just define my ostringstream overload like: template<typename T> enable_if_t<!experimental::is_detected<decltype(std::to_string(std::declval<T>())), T>::value, string> (T t){ return static_cast<ostringstream&>(ostringstream() << t).str(); } – Jonathan Mee May 13 '15 at 11:38
  • @JonathanMee No, is_detected's first parameter is a template template parameter. You need an alias template. – T.C. May 13 '15 at 16:00
  • 1
    @JonathanMee It's a template template parameter (hint, that repetition was intentional), and it expects a class or alias template as the argument. – T.C. May 18 '15 at 14:55
15

Using Walter Brown's void_t:

template <typename...>
using void_t = void;

It's very easy to make such a type trait:

template<typename T, typename = void>
struct has_to_string
: std::false_type { };

template<typename T>
struct has_to_string<T, 
    void_t<decltype(std::to_string(std::declval<T>()))>
    > 
: std::true_type { };
  • 2
    Very elegant, +1. Do you happen to know if that has a good chance of making standardisation? – TartanLlama May 12 '15 at 12:30
  • 1
    @TartanLlama No clue. At least it's very easy to implement yourself :) – Barry May 12 '15 at 12:33
  • 4
    @TartanLlama It's in the draft of the next standard. GCC and Clang have it when compiling with -std=c++1z (and they have __void_t with -std=c++11) and MSVC 2015 has it. – Oktalist May 12 '15 at 13:47
  • 2
    @JonathanMee Change what? I don't know what you're talking about. Everything you need is in Barry's answer. You can replace void_t with std::void_t or std::__void_t if your standard library implements it, the result will be the same. – Oktalist May 12 '15 at 14:14
  • 3
    @JonathanMee The benefit of using void_t is that it works. Matthis Vega's answer doesn't work. – Barry May 13 '15 at 11:36
14

First, I think SFINAE should usually be hidden from interfaces. It makes the interface messy. Put the SFINAE away from the surface, and use tag dispatching to pick an overload.

Second, I even hide SFINAE from the traits class. Writing "can I do X" code is common enough in my experience that I don't want to have to write messy SFINAE code to do it. So instead I write a generic can_apply trait, and have a trait that SFINAE fails if passed the wrong types using decltype.

We then feed the SFIANE failing decltype trait to can_apply, and get out a true/false type depending on if the application fails.

This reduces the work per "can I do X" trait to a minimal amount, and places the somewhat tricky and fragile SFINAE code away from day-to-day work.

I use C++1z's void_t. Implementing it yourself is easy (at the bottom of this answer).

A metafunction similar to can_apply is being proposed for standardization in C++1z, but it isn't as stable as void_t is, so I'm not using it.

First, a details namespace to hide the implementation of can_apply from being found by accident:

namespace details {
  template<template<class...>class Z, class, class...>
  struct can_apply:std::false_type{};
  template<template<class...>class Z, class...Ts>
  struct can_apply<Z, std::void_t<Z<Ts...>>, Ts...>:
    std::true_type{};
}

We can then write can_apply in terms of details::can_apply, and it has a nicer interface (it doesn't require the extra void being passed):

template<template<class...>class Z, class...Ts>
using can_apply=details::can_apply<Z, void, Ts...>;

The above is generic helper metaprogramming code. Once we have it in place, we can write a can_to_string traits class very cleanly:

template<class T>
using to_string_t = decltype( std::to_string( std::declval<T>() ) );

template<class T>
using can_to_string = can_apply< to_string_t, T >;

and we have a trait can_to_string<T> that is true iff we can to_string a T.

The work require to write a new trait like that is now 2-4 lines of simple code -- just make a decltype using alias, and then do a can_apply test on it.

Once we have that, we use tag dispatching to the proper implementation:

template<typename T>
std::string stringify(T t, std::true_type /*can to string*/){
  return std::to_string(t);
}
template<typename T>
std::string stringify(T t, std::false_type /*cannot to string*/){
  return static_cast<ostringstream&>(ostringstream() << t).str();
}
template<typename T>
std::string stringify(T t){
  return stringify(t, can_to_string<T>{});
}

All of the ugly code is hiding in the details namespace.

If you need a void_t, use this:

template<class...>struct voider{using type=void;};
template<class...Ts>using void_t=typename voider<Ts...>::type;

which works in most major C++11 compilers.

Note that the simpler template<class...>using void_t=void; fails to work in some older C++11 compilers (there was an ambiguity in the standard).

  • What I don't like about this form of tag dispatch is that the meaning of true_type and false_type is defined only by the caller. It is not immediately obvious what is tested from just the set of dispatch targets. The MF(Args) form of concepts emulation has the advantage that it is lazily evaluated, as opposed to alias templates. This can be used to prevent substitution failures which don't appear in the immediate context. – dyp May 12 '15 at 16:11
  • @dyp true. Which is why I usually give it a commented-out name. Added ` /*can to string*/` in both cases. I'm uncertain what kind of errors your MF approach avoids in the non-immediate context that mine doesn't? Is it because of the choice<> overloads or something? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 12 '15 at 16:20
  • No, and I'm not sure if you'd ever encounter them in tag dispatch (as opposed to concepts emulation). If there's a complex expression like is_complete<T>::value && is_trivial<T>::value, then you'll have to split this up and make sure that is_trivial<T> is not instantiated if is_complete is false (otherwise UB). For more complex traits, is_trivial can be an alias template, so you'd have to delay instantiation. OTOH, is_trivial(T) does not immediately instantiate is_trivial. – dyp May 12 '15 at 16:33
  • @Yakk Are you on the library fundamentals group? std::experimental::is_detected is your can_apply, pretty much. – Barry May 12 '15 at 18:32
  • @Barry nope. Someone else has noticed the similarity and shown me a link to the paper before, however. It was just me getting tired as writing the void_t SFINAE template boilerplate again and again. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 12 '15 at 19:44
9

You could write a helper trait for this using expression SFINAE:

namespace detail
{
    //base case, to_string is invalid
    template <typename T>
    auto has_to_string_helper (...) //... to disambiguate call
       -> false_type;

    //true case, to_string valid for T
    template <typename T>
    auto has_to_string_helper (int) //int to disambiguate call
       -> decltype(std::to_string(std::declval<T>()), true_type{});
}

//alias to make it nice to use
template <typename T>
using has_to_string = decltype(detail::has_to_string_helper<T>(0));

Then use std::enable_if_t<has_to_string<T>::value>

Demo

  • This appears to work well, thanks for the rewrite. It looks like has_to_string_helper is a variable template or something, but what is the -> doing? I'm not familiar with that use of the arrow operator. – Jonathan Mee May 18 '15 at 12:03
  • 1
    has_to_string_helper is a template function declaration. We never need to define it as we are just using it as a compile-time construct. The -> is using C++11's trailing return type syntax. I think it's a bit clearer in this case. – TartanLlama May 18 '15 at 12:06
  • Wouldn't I have to write an overload of has_to_string_helper for every type that to_string actually accepts for this to correctly return true_type? That seems like a lot of work! – Jonathan Mee May 18 '15 at 14:28
  • No, it's templated. The true case will be used if that decltype expression is valid, otherwise the false case will be used. – TartanLlama May 18 '15 at 14:30
  • Ah, so the int is just cause you're using functions instead of objects to hold your types, so you need an overload. – Jonathan Mee May 18 '15 at 14:38
4

I think there are two problems: 1) Find all viable algorithms for a given type. 2) Select the best one.

We can, for example, manually specify an order for a set of overloaded algorithms:

namespace detail
{
    template<typename T, REQUIRES(helper::has_to_string(T))>
    std::string stringify(choice<0>, T&& t)
    {
        using std::to_string;
        return to_string(std::forward<T>(t));
    }

    template<std::size_t N>
    std::string stringify(choice<1>, char const(&arr)[N])
    {
        return std::string(arr, N);
    }

    template<typename T, REQUIRES(helper::has_output_operator(T))>
    std::string stringify(choice<2>, T&& t)
    {
        std::ostringstream o;
        o << std::forward<T>(t);
        return std::move(o).str();
    }
}

The first function parameter specifies the order between those algorithms ("first choice", "second choice", ..). In order to select an algorithm, we simply dispatch to the best viable match:

template<typename T>
auto stringify(T&& t)
    -> decltype( detail::stringify(choice<0>{}, std::forward<T>(t)) )
{
    return detail::stringify(choice<0>{}, std::forward<T>(t));
}

How is this implemented? We steal a bit from Xeo @ Flaming Dangerzone and Paul @ void_t "can implement concepts"? (using simplified implementations):

constexpr static std::size_t choice_max = 10;
template<std::size_t N> struct choice : choice<N+1>
{
    static_assert(N < choice_max, "");
};
template<> struct choice<choice_max> {};


#include <type_traits>

template<typename T, typename = void> struct models : std::false_type {};
template<typename MF, typename... Args>
struct models<MF(Args...),
                decltype(MF{}.requires_(std::declval<Args>()...),
                         void())>
    : std::true_type {};

#define REQUIRES(...) std::enable_if_t<models<__VA_ARGS__>::value>* = nullptr

The choice classes inherit from worse choices: choice<0> inherits from choice<1>. Therefore, for an argument of type choice<0>, a function parameter of type choice<0> is a better match than choice<1>, which is a better match than choice<2> and so on [over.ics.rank]p4.4

Note that the more specialized tie breaker applies only if neither of two functions is better. Due to the total order of choices, we'll never get into that situation. This prevents calls from being ambiguous, even if multiple algorithms are viable.

We define our type traits:

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
namespace helper
{
    using std::to_string;
    struct has_to_string
    {
        template<typename T>
        auto requires_(T&& t) -> decltype( to_string(std::forward<T>(t)) );
    };

    struct has_output_operator
    {
        std::ostream& ostream();

        template<typename T>
        auto requires_(T&& t) -> decltype(ostream() << std::forward<T>(t));
    };
}

Macros can be avoided by using an idea from R. Martinho Fernandes:

template<typename T>
using requires = std::enable_if_t<models<T>::value, int>;

// exemplary application:

template<typename T, requires<helper::has_to_string(T)> = 0>
std::string stringify(choice<0>, T&& t)
{
    using std::to_string;
    return to_string(std::forward<T>(t));
}
  • Shouldn't (ostringstream{} << x).str() fail since ostream doesn't have an str() method? – 0x499602D2 May 12 '15 at 13:08
  • 2
    @0x499602D2 Ah yes, it certainly seems so: libc++ defines the following overload: inline _LIBCPP_INLINE_VISIBILITY typename enable_if<!is_lvalue_reference<_Stream>::value && is_base_of<ios_base, _Stream>::value, _Stream&&>::type operator<<(_Stream&& __os, const _Tp& __x) – dyp May 12 '15 at 13:22
  • 1
    @Barry It's for stopping the user from having to provide an extra template parameter. See this. – TartanLlama May 12 '15 at 14:16
  • 1
    Macros? Not worth it... – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 12 '15 at 15:35
  • 1
    @JonathanMee MF is not a function type. MF(int, double) is a function type. E.g. struct MF {}; MF my_function(int, double); then the type of my_function is MF(int, double) and the type of a pointer to my_function is MF(*)(int double). MF{} creates an object of type MF, and we're calling its member function requires_ to see if that compiles. In order to pass both MF and the argument types as a single template argument, we need to store both in a single type. This can be a tuple<MF, Args...> or a function type like MF(Args...). – dyp May 19 '15 at 15:43
2

Well, you can just skip all the metaprogramming magic and use the fit::conditional adaptor from the Fit library:

FIT_STATIC_LAMBDA_FUNCTION(stringify) = fit::conditional(
    [](auto x) -> decltype(to_string(x))
    {
        return to_string(x);
    },
    [](auto x) -> decltype(static_cast<ostringstream&>(ostringstream() << x).str())
    {
        return static_cast<ostringstream&>(ostringstream() << x).str();
    }
);

Or even more compact, if you don't mind macros:

FIT_STATIC_LAMBDA_FUNCTION(stringify) = fit::conditional(
    [](auto x) FIT_RETURNS(to_string(x)),
    [](auto x) FIT_RETURNS(static_cast<ostringstream&>(ostringstream() << x).str())
);

Note, I also constrained the second function as well, so if the type can't be called with to_string nor streamed to ostringstream then the function can't be called. This helps with better error messages and better composability with checking type requirements.

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