51

Seeing this question: Is there a (built-in) way in JavaScript to check if a string is a valid number? and this: jsperf, one of the presented approaches is this (mutatis mutandis):

var a = "123"
var b = "123b"

if ( +a === +a ) // true

if ( +b === +b ) // false

How does this logic work internally in JavaScript to make this possible?

My question is not how to check if a string is a valid number – this is already answered here: Validate decimal numbers in JavaScript - IsNumeric(). I want to understand how the statement +a === +a works.

  • 6
    It's a magic of NaN. But I would use isNaN(+a) for this – Alexey Ten May 12 '15 at 13:54
  • It's all in the spec. – zzzzBov May 12 '15 at 13:54
  • 2
    The core logic here is that NaN !== NaN – devnull69 May 12 '15 at 13:55
  • 1
    Seeing the huge speed of this in Chrome in the jsperf I'm ready to double-bet that V8 optimizes the test to not even have to run it! – Paul Stenne May 13 '15 at 9:22
64

+ converts the value to a number.

a gets converted to 123 and 123 === 123.

b gets converted to NaN but NaN !== NaN (because NaN is never equal to another NaN according step 4a of the equality rules).

  • 4
    The step 4a makes this possible and explains the magic – Paulo Coghi May 12 '15 at 13:58
  • 9
    It's worth noting that that particular quirk (NaN != NaN) is inherited from the IEEE 754 standard for floating point numbers, and so actually holds for most languages. – Tikhon Jelvis May 12 '15 at 20:40
  • But 123b = 4667! – Pureferret May 13 '15 at 13:34
16

The + operator here is known as the Unary Plus.

The unary plus operator precedes its operand and evaluates to its operand but attempts to converts it into a number, if it isn't already.

+"123" evaulates as 123.

+a === +a
-> +"123" === +"123"
  -> 123 === 123
    -> true

+"123b" evaluates as NaN (Not a Number), as the b character cannot be converted with the Unary Plus as without any prefix (like 0x for hexadecimal) the Unary Plus will assume the value is decimal (0-9). NaN is a special case in that it does not compare against anything, including itself:

NaN === NaN
-> false

NaN !== NaN
-> true

Because of this, our +b test case fails:

+b === +b
-> +"123b" === +"123b"
  -> NaN === NaN
    -> false

If you want both to evaluate to true we can add an isNaN() call at the end:

if ( +a === +a || isNaN(+a) )

if ( +b === +b || isNaN(+b) )
  • Is +a === +a || isNaN(+a) not always true? – Rawling May 12 '15 at 14:38
  • 1
    @Rawling yep! :D – James Donnelly May 12 '15 at 14:39
6

+"123b" is NaN. NaN is not equal to anything, including NaN.

0

The two variables are string, but javascript convert automatically any string to a number when you + or - .

var a = "1";
var b = a;     // b = "1": a string
var c = +a;    // c = 1: a number
var d = -a;    // d = -1: a number

and Basically in your example you try to do this:

if ( +"123" === +"123" )  => ( 123 === 123) // true
if ( +"123b" === +"123b" ) => (NaN === NaN) // false

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