38

I have a ASP.NET MVC 6 (beta-4) app.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    // Logging
    services.AddLogging();

    // ...
}

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerfactory)
{
    // Add the console logger.
    loggerfactory.AddConsole(minLevel: LogLevel.Warning);

    // ...
}

And I have a controller...

public class HomeController : 
    Controller
{
    ILogger _logger;

    public HomeController(ILogger logger) 
    {
        _logger = logger;
    }

    // ...
}

But when I'm not getting the service registered correctly somehow: InvalidOperationException: Unable to resolve service for type 'Microsoft.Framework.Logging.ILogger' while attempting to activate 'HomeController'.. What am I doing wrong with the registering the logger?

  • You didn't register ILogger. – Steven May 12 '15 at 15:20
  • Isn't that was service.AddLogging() does? I might have made a grand assumption with that, time to go source diving. – Travis May 12 '15 at 17:13
  • So, AddLogging() should register ILogger<>. Maybe I need to inject ILogger<T> instead of ILogger. – Travis May 12 '15 at 17:18
  • Just looked in the vNext source code myself and I think you are right. But still, I wouldn't want to depend on a framework defined abstraction at all. For more infor, see this. – Steven May 12 '15 at 17:22
  • Oh, I thought I pasted the code link in: github.com/aspnet/Logging/blob/… . Microsoft is providing an abstraction so you can use any logger with just some configuration. I'm okay with that rather than sticking with a single one. Though I have never bothered to change a logger once it was on board. – Travis May 12 '15 at 17:24
83

I assumed that services.AddLogging(); was doing the right thing and registering ILogger. After looking at the source (https://github.com/aspnet/Logging/blob/d874c5726e713d3eb34938f85faf7be61aae0f2a/src/Microsoft.Framework.Logging/LoggingServiceCollectionExtensions.cs) I found that it's actually registering ILogger<>. Changing the signature of ILogger to ILogger<HomeController> makes the above example work.

public class HomeController : 
    Controller
{
    ILogger<HomeController> _logger;

    public HomeController(ILogger<HomeController> logger) 
    {
        _logger = logger;
    }

    // ...
}

Thanks to @Steve for setting me on the right track to find this.

  • This works. I read they are going to alter RC2 to have <T> return whatever T is (like <AppSpecificLogger>) so you can actually get your implementation and not just the interface methods. Currently, you can put anything in there and it works, looks like it ignores it. I tested ILogger<IMemoryCache> just to test that theory and it worked. – b.pell Feb 12 '16 at 18:10
  • 1
    What T is actually used for, is the logging context. - you call ILogger <T> where T would usually be the calling type., but could anything really. – VisualBean Mar 22 '16 at 14:52
  • You can also specify ILoggerFactory as described here docs.asp.net/en/latest/fundamentals/logging.html – stankovski Jun 21 '16 at 23:52
  • Really the signature was the issue. This have been working for me. ILogger<HomeController>. Thanks a lot. – Sandro Stadler Jun 29 '17 at 12:40
  • 1
    This just saved me after a couple hours of being dumbfounded. – Ben Humphrey Apr 7 '18 at 6:06
7

The services.AddLogging(); didn't worked for me, so I added these two statements to ConfigureServices:

services.AddSingleton<ILoggerFactory, LoggerFactory>();
services.AddSingleton(typeof(ILogger<>), typeof(Logger<>));

Now the DI container is happy and everything works.

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