3

I am currently implementing Spring Security in my application. I did manage to put @Secured annotation on my service that getAllUsers() from the database, and it is working fine as long as the user is identified (depending on his rights, he can get or not the list of users).

But I have a @Scheduled method in charge of indexing all users, and when it is launched it call the same protected getAllUsers() method, and obviously crashes as it is not logged in : I get the following exception :

org.springframework.security.authentication.AuthenticationCredentialsNotFoundException: An Authentication object was not found in the SecurityContext

I'm currently thinking of one possible solution, which would be to mark the internal methods with a custom annotation, which would be retrieved by a custom AccessDecisionVoter allowing the caller to call the protected method.

I'm looking for best practice for this kind of usecase

2
2

Because method is @Secured and spring expect security authentication object in context. Here is working example of AccessDecisionVoter Spring-security - AccessDecisionVoter-impl wont be invoked

or if u will have filters or smth which will depends on user context values this one should be ok

@Scheduled
public void method() {
try {
    ScheduledAuthenticationUtil.configureAuthentication();
    // do work
}
catch(Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
finally {
    ScheduledAuthenticationUtil.cleanAuthentication();
}
}


private static class ScheduledAuthenticationUtil {

    public static void configureAuthentication() {
        // inject auth obj into SecurityContextHolder
    }

    public static void cleanAuthentication() {
        // SecurityContextHolder clean authentication
    }
}
0
2

I assume your service class looks like :

public class MyServiceImpl implements MyService {
    ...
    @Secured
    public Xxx getAllUsers() {
        ...
        // call DAO 
        ...
        return xxx;
    }
    ...
}

And you call myService.getAllUsers() from the @Scheduledclass.

The simplest way is to split getAllUsers and make the service class inherit from 2 interfaces, one containing the secured method, and one that would contain a publically accessible version :

public class MyServiceImpl implements MyService, MyScheduledService {
    ...
    @Secured
    public Xxx getAllUsers() {
        return restrictedGetAllUsers;
    }
    public Xxx restrictedGetAllUsers() {
        ...
        // call DAO 
        ...
        return xxx;
    }
    ...
}

public interface MyService {
    Xxx getAllUsers();
}

public interface MyScheduledService extends MyService {
    Xxx restrictedGetAllUsers();
}

Then in your controller class :

@Autowired MyService myService   => will call only getAllUsers()

and in your @Scheduled class :

@Autowired MyScheduledService myService   => will call restrictedGetAllUsers()

All that may seem overcomplicated, but as your scheduled class and you controller have no reason to call the service methods the same way, it make sense to present them two different interfaces with different security requirements.

1

I went with kxyz answer, improved with a service that run a piece of code by setting the wanted Authorities before running the code, and putting back the previous authorities when the code is done :

public void runAs(Runnable runnable, GrantedAuthority... authorities) {
    Authentication previousAuthentication = SecurityContextHolder.getContext().getAuthentication();

    configureAuthentication(authorities);
    try {
      runnable.run();
    } finally {
      configureAuthentication(previousAuthentication);
    }
  }

protected void configureAuthentication(GrantedAuthority... authorities) {
    Authentication authentication = new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken("system", null, Arrays.asList(authorities));
    configureAuthentication(authentication);
}

protected void configureAuthentication(Authentication authentication) {
    SecurityContextHolder.getContext().setAuthentication(authentication);
}
0

Reffers to PhilippeAuriach answer - there is a better way to run new thread with authorites - with spring security extended runnable method, context from main thread is copied into delegated runnable

public void authorizedExecute(Runnable runnable) {
    new Thread(new DelegatingSecurityContextRunnable(runnable)).start();
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.