I want to ignore case when comparing string in my queries using SQL Server. So far I am able to do it using something like this:

SELECT *
FROM Venue
WHERE
   Name COLLATE Latin1_general_CI_AI Like '%cafe%' COLLATE Latin1_general_CI_AI

Is there a way to set a global directive so that it would effect every query? Something like this:

SET COLLATE Latin1_general_CI_AI;
SELECT *
    FROM Venue
    WHERE
       Name Like '%this%';
SELECT *
    FROM Venue
    WHERE
       Name Like '%that%';
...

Thank you!

migrated from serverfault.com May 12 '15 at 16:42

This question came from our site for system and network administrators.

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is there a way to set a global directive so that it would effect every query?

No.

Collation is not a session property that applies to queries, and it cannot be changed dynamically.

The other problem with this request is that case-sensitivity is not an option that can be enabled or disabled by itself: it is a property of a collation, just like accent-sensitivity, width-sensitivity, what order the particular alphabet is arranged in, etc. A query can compare multiple fields, each with a different collation. So even if you could set a collation that would be in effect for the session, that would potentially force columns of other collations to convert collations on the fly when not even being requested to be case-insensitive. A global session setting would also affect sorting (i.e. TOP(n), ORDER BY, etc) and not just comparisons.

Since the issue is that a user wants to determine per execution whether or not to ignore part of the collation, there are a few options, but all will incur some performance penalty:

  1. Construct the query (or queries) in Dynamic SQL:

    DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(MAX),
            @Collation NVARCHAR(50);
    
    SET @Collation = '';
    IF (@CaseInsensitive = 1)
    BEGIN
      SET @Collation = N'COLLATE Latin1_general_CI_AI';
    END;
    
    SET @SQL = N'SELECT *
      FROM Venue
      WHERE Name ' + @Collation + N' LIKE ''%' + @SearchParam
                   + N'%'' ' + @Collation;
    
    EXEC(@SQL);
    
  2. Translate each character into upper-case and lower-case pairs in single-character ranges. This can be done in the app layer for the parameter value being searched on:

    • For default case-sensitive (don't do anything):
      @SearchParam = 'This'
    • For case-insensitive:
      @SearchParam = '[tT][hH][iI][sS]'
  3. Force everything to the same case. Assume that the option to do case-insensitive is an additional parameter that is passed in:

    SELECT *
    FROM Venue
    WHERE CASE @CaseInsensitive
            WHEN 1 THEN LOWER(Name)
            ELSE Name
          END
             LIKE 
          CASE @CaseInsensitive
            WHEN 1 THEN '%' + LOWER(@SearchParam) + '%'
            ELSE '%' + @SearchParam + '%'
          END;
    

    Or, do the LOWER() prior to the query:

    IF (@CaseInsensitive = 1)
    BEGIN
      SET @SearchParam = LOWER(@SearchParam);
    END;
    
    SELECT *
    FROM Venue
    WHERE CASE @CaseInsensitive
            WHEN 1 THEN LOWER(Name)
            ELSE Name
          END
             LIKE '%' + @SearchParam + '%';
    
  • 2
    I would use the third variant. And move processing of the @SearchParam outside the query itself. Just to make it a bit cleaner. – Vladimir Baranov May 12 '15 at 23:38
  • @VladimirBaranov Yeah, I had considered mentioning that @SearchParam could be "lowered" in the app layer, but wasn't really comfortable with requiring that amount of faith in the caller / implementer of the query ;-). But, it is still an option to be considered so I did add it to #3 as well as my concern about that approach. Also, I was kinda preferring option #2 due to potential Query Optimizer issues with the CASE statement in #3, but proper performance testing should be the deciding factor :-). – Solomon Rutzky May 13 '15 at 2:31
  • 1
    Actually, I thought of calculating LOWER(@SearchParam) on the server at the beginning of the stored procedure. Doing it in the application could be incorrect (at least theoretically, if collation that application uses is not exactly the same as collation that the server uses, then result of ToLower in the app could be different to LOWER in the server). Performance will be terrible in any case when you do LIKE '%something%'. – Vladimir Baranov May 13 '15 at 2:53
  • @VladimirBaranov Duh, that makes much more sense ;-). I have updated again. – Solomon Rutzky May 13 '15 at 3:45

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