6

I want to set a time limit on a PowerShell (v2) script so it forcibly exits after that time limit has expired.

I see in PHP they have commands like set_time_limit and max_execution_time where you can limit how long the script and even a function can execute for.

With my script, a do/while loop that is looking at the time isn't appropriate as I am calling an external code library that can just hang for a long time.

I want to limit a block of code and only allow it to run for x seconds, after which I will terminate that code block and return a response to the user that the script timed out.

I have looked at background jobs but they operate in a different thread so won't have kill rights over the parent thread.

Has anyone dealt with this or have a solution?

Thanks!

1

I know this is an old post, but I have used this in my scripts.

I am not sure if its the correct use of it, but the System.Timers.Timer that George put up gave me an idea and it seems to be working for me.

I use it for servers that sometimes hang on a WMI query, the timeout stops it getting stuck. Instead of write-host I then output the message to a log file so I can see which servers are broken and fix them if needed.

I also don't use a guid I use the servers hostname.

I hope this makes sense and helps you.

$MyScript = {
              Get-WmiObject -ComputerName MyComputer -Class win32_operatingsystem
            }

$JobGUID = [system.Guid]::NewGuid()

$elapsedEventHandler = {
    param ([System.Object]$sender, [System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs]$e)

    ($sender -as [System.Timers.Timer]).Stop()
    Unregister-Event -SourceIdentifier $JobGUID
    Write-Host "Job $JobGUID removed by force as it exceeded timeout!"
    Get-Job -Name $JobGUID | Remove-Job -Force
}

$timer = New-Object System.Timers.Timer -ArgumentList 3000 #just change the timeout here
Register-ObjectEvent -InputObject $timer -EventName Elapsed -Action $elapsedEventHandler -SourceIdentifier $JobGUID
$timer.Start()

Start-Job -ScriptBlock $MyScript -Name $JobGUID
2

Something like this should work too...

$job = Start-Job -Name "Job1" -ScriptBlock {Do {"Something"} Until ($False)}
Start-Sleep -s 10
Stop-Job $job
1
  • This does have the problem that it will wait until the time has elapsed, even if the program has terminated earlier... – Algoman Jan 7 '18 at 21:58
2

Here's my solution, inspired by this blog post. It will finish running when all has been executed, or time runs out (whichever happens first).

I place the stuff I want to execute during a limited time in a function:

function WhatIWannaDo($param1, $param2)
{
    # Do something... that maybe takes some time?
    Write-Output "Look at my nice params : $param1, $param2"
}

I have another funtion that will keep tabs on a timer and if everything has finished executing:

function Limit-JobWithTime($Job, $TimeInSeconds, $RetryInterval=5)
{
    try
    {
        $timer = [Diagnostics.Stopwatch]::StartNew()

        while (($timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds -lt $TimeInSeconds) -and ('Running' -eq $job.JobStateInfo.State)) {
            $totalSecs = [math]::Round($timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds,0)
            $tsString = $("{0:hh}:{0:mm}:{0:ss}" -f [timespan]::fromseconds($totalSecs))
            Write-Progress "Still waiting for action $($Job.Name) to complete after [$tsString] ..."
            Start-Sleep -Seconds ([math]::Min($RetryInterval, [System.Int32]($TimeInSeconds-$totalSecs)))
        }
        $timer.Stop()
        $totalSecs = [math]::Round($timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds,0)
        $tsString = $("{0:hh}:{0:mm}:{0:ss}" -f [timespan]::fromseconds($totalSecs))
        if ($timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds -gt $TimeInSeconds -and ('Running' -eq $job.JobStateInfo.State)) {
            Stop-Job $job
            Write-Verbose "Action $($Job.Name) did not complete before timeout period of $tsString."

        } else {
            if('Failed' -eq $job.JobStateInfo.State){
                $err = $job.ChildJobs[0].Error
                $reason = $job.ChildJobs[0].JobStateInfo.Reason.Message
                Write-Error "Job $($Job.Name) failed after with the following Error and Reason: $err, $reason"
            }
            else{
                Write-Verbose "Action $($Job.Name) completed before timeout period. job ran: $tsString."
            }
        }        
    }
    catch
    {
    Write-Error $_.Exception.Message
    }
}

... and then finally I start my function WhatIWannaDo as a background job and pass it on to the Limit-JobWithTime (including example of how to get output from the Job):

#... maybe some stuff before?
$job = Start-Job -Name PrettyName -Scriptblock ${function:WhatIWannaDo} -argumentlist @("1st param", "2nd param")
Limit-JobWithTime $job -TimeInSeconds 60
Write-Verbose "Output from $($Job.Name): "
$output = (Receive-Job -Keep -Job $job)
$output | %{Write-Verbose "> $_"}
#... maybe some stuff after?
1

Here is an example of using a Timer. I haven't tried it personally, but I think it should work:

function Main
{
    # do main logic here
}

function Stop-Script
{
    Write-Host "Called Stop-Script."
    [System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.Runspace]::DefaultRunspace.CloseAsync()
}

$elapsedEventHandler = {
    param ([System.Object]$sender, [System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs]$e)

    Write-Host "Event handler invoked."
    ($sender -as [System.Timers.Timer]).Stop()
    Unregister-Event -SourceIdentifier Timer.Elapsed
    Stop-Script
}

$timer = New-Object System.Timers.Timer -ArgumentList 2000 # setup the timer to fire the elapsed event after 2 seconds
Register-ObjectEvent -InputObject $timer -EventName Elapsed -SourceIdentifier Timer.Elapsed -Action $elapsedEventHandler
$timer.Start()

Main
0

How about something like this:

## SET YOUR TIME LIMIT
## IN THIS EXAMPLE 1 MINUTE, BUT YOU CAN ALSO USE HOURS/DAYS
# $TimeSpan = New-TimeSpan -Days 1 -Hours 2 -Minutes 30
$TimeSpan = New-TimeSpan -Minutes 1
$EndTime = (Get-Date).AddMinutes($TimeSpan.TotalMinutes).ToString("HH:mm")

## START TIMED LOOP
cls
do
{
## START YOUR SCRIPT
Write-Warning "Test-Job 1...2...3..."
Start-Sleep 3
Write-Warning "End Time = $EndTime`n"
}
until ($EndTime -eq (Get-Date -Format HH:mm))

## TIME REACHED AND END SCRIPT
Write-Host "End Time reached!" -ForegroundColor Green

When using hours or days as a timer, make sure you adjust the $TimeSpan.TotalMinutes and the HH:mm format, since this does not facilitate the use of days in the example.

0

I came up with this script.

  • Start-Transcript to log all actions and save them to a file.
  • Store the current process ID value in the variable $p then write it to screen.
  • Assign the current date to the $startTime variable.
  • Afterwards I assign it again and add the extra time to the current date to the var $expiration.
  • The updateTime function return what time there is left before the application closes. And writes it to console.
  • Start looping and kill process if the timer exceeds the expiration time.
  • That's it.

Code:

Start-Transcript C:\Transcriptlog-Cleanup.txt #write log to this location
$p = Get-Process  -Id $pid | select -Expand id  # -Expand selcts the string from the object id out of the current proces.
Write-Host $p

$startTime = (Get-Date) # set start time
$startTime
$expiration = (Get-Date).AddSeconds(20) #program expires at this time
# you could change the expiration time by changing (Get-Date).AddSeconds(20) to (Get-Date).AddMinutes(10)or to hours whatever you like

#-----------------
#Timer update function setup
function UpdateTime
   {
    $LeftMinutes =   ($expiration) - (Get-Date) | Select -Expand minutes  # sets minutes left to left time
    $LeftSeconds =   ($expiration) - (Get-Date) | Select -Expand seconds  # sets seconds left to left time


    #Write time to console
    Write-Host "------------------------------------------------------------------" 
    Write-Host "Timer started at     :  "  $startTime
    Write-Host "Current time         :  "  (Get-Date)
    Write-Host "Timer ends at        :  "  $expiration
    Write-Host "Time on expire timer : "$LeftMinutes "Minutes" $LeftSeconds "Seconds"
    Write-Host "------------------------------------------------------------------" 
    }
#-----------------


do{   #start loop
    Write-Host "Working"#start doing other script stuff
    Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 5000  #add delay to reduce spam and processing power
    UpdateTime #call upadate function to print time
 }
until ($p.HasExited -or (Get-Date) -gt $expiration) #check exit time

Write-Host "done"
Stop-Transcript
if (-not $p.HasExited) { Stop-Process -ID $p -PassThru } # kill process after time expires
1
  • Can you add a short description? – RtmY Apr 10 '19 at 9:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.