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Today I maintain project that has really messy DB that need a lot of refactor and publish on clients machines.

I know that I could add a SQL Server Database project that contains just scripts of the database and creates a .dacpac file that allows me to change clients databases automatically.

Also I know that I could just add an .mdf file to the App_Data or even to Solution_Data folder and have my database there. I suppose that localDb that already exists allows me to startup my solution without SQL Server

And atlast i know that Entity Framework exist with it's own migrations. But i don't want to use it, besouse i can't add and change indexes with it's migrations and i don't have anought flexibility when i need to describe difficult migrations scenarios.

My goals:

  1. Generate migration scripts to clients DB's automaticaly.
  2. Make my solution self-contained, that any new Programmer that came to project don't even need to install SQL Server on his machine.
  3. Be able to update local (development) base in 1-2 clicks.
  4. Be able to move back in history of db changes (I have TFS server)
  5. Be able to have clean (only with dictionaries or lookup tables) db in solution with up to date DB scheme.
  6. Additionally i want to be able to update my DB model (EF or .dbml) automatically or very easy way.

So what I what to ask:

  • What's a strengths and weaknesses of using this 2 approaches if I want to achive my goals?

  • Can be that I should use sort of combination of this tools?

  • Or don't I know about other existing tool from MS?

  • Is there a way to update my DAL model from this DB?

  • Well, LocalDB is another developer-oriented version of SQL Server Express - and if you want to use a .mdf file locally on a machine, you must have SQL Server Express installed. If you put the database on the server in a network (where it really belongs), then you can connect any number of PC's to it, without having a local copy of SQL Server installed – marc_s May 13 '15 at 8:12
  • @marc_s thanks for this important detail. But as i know SQL Express came with VS, so you don't need to install it separatly, am i right? – teo van kot May 13 '15 at 8:28
  • On a dev machine, SQL Server Express and LocalDB are installed together with Visual Studio (unless you specifically de-select them in the installer) – marc_s May 13 '15 at 9:03
  • you can add indexes using EF (in the model using annotations) see c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/ff2f08/… and msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj591583.aspx – Steve Ford May 19 '15 at 13:12
  • @SteveFord yes, i can, but i have no controll to verify them at compile time, and this is extension of EF. And in sql project i can verify whole project at build time and see all errors. – teo van kot May 19 '15 at 13:16
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What's a strengths and weaknesses of using this 2 approaches if I want to achive my goals?

Using a database project allows you to version control all of the database objects. You can publish to various database instances and roll out changes incrementally, rather than having to drop and recreate the database, thus preserving data. These changes can be in the form of a dacpac, a SQL script, or done right through the VS interface. You gain a lot of control over deployments using pre- and post-deployment scripts and publishing profiles. Developers will be required to install SQL Server (the developer/express edition is usually good enough).

LocalDB is a little easier to work with -- you can make your changes directly in the database without having to publish. LocalDB doesn't have a built-in publish process for pushing changes to other instances. No SQL Server installation required.

Use a database project if you need version control for your database objects, if you have multiple users concurrently making changes, or if you have multiple applications that use the same database. Use LocalDB if none of those conditions apply or for small apps that require their own standalone database.

Can be that I should use sort of combination of this tools?

Yes. According to Kevin's comment below, "If the Database Project is set as your startup project, hitting F5 will automatically deploy it to LocalDB. You don't even need a publish profile in this case."

Or don't I know about other existing tool from MS?

Entity Framework's Code First approach comes close.

Is there a way to update my DAL model from this DB?

Entity Framework's POCO generator works well unless you make changes to your DAL classes, then those changes get lost the next time you run the generator.

There is a new tool called SqlSharpener which can generate classes from the SQL files in a database project. I have not used it so I cannot vouch for it but it looks promising.

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    I read a lot about code first and ef migrations, but i don't like this approach, becose you can't create indexes easy and have no good controll on dofficult migration scenarios. – teo van kot May 13 '15 at 16:55
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    If the Database Project is set as your startup project, hitting F5 will automatically deploy it to LocalDB. You don't even need a publish profile in this case. – Kevin Cunnane May 13 '15 at 23:33
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One way for generating client script for DB changes is to use database modeling tool like ERWin Which have a free community edition. The best way to meet your database version control requirement and easy script generation is Redgate SQL Source Control. Using Redgate tool you will meet the first five goals mentioned. Moreover, you can now update EF Model by single click after changing DB schema (i.e. Database first approach) as required in goal 6.

I do not recommend using LocalDB at all. It always make issues with source control like "DB File is in use and can't commit...” In addition, the developer in the project will not have common set of updated data to work on unless a developer add test data to the database and ask others to get latest version and overwrite their own database Or generate update script by the previous mentioned tool and ask every developer to run it on his localDB. The best way in your situation is to use SQL Server on network. A master version that all the developers use. Since you have version control on the database using previously mentioned tool, you can rollback any buggy change in the database server.

If you think that RedGate tool is expensive for the budget of your project. A second approach is to generate single SQL file from your database that has all database object and the other developers update the SQL file in source control per their changes. This can be done easily by using schema compare tool in visual studio and appending the generated script to SQL file in the source control. With EF DB First approach, you will not have to add many migration classes as in EF Code first.

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