I have a generic method with this (dummy) code (yes I'm aware IList has predicates, but my code is not using IList but some other collection, anyway this is irrelevant for the question...)

static T FindThing<T>(IList collection, int id) where T : IThing, new()
{
    foreach T thing in collecion
    {
        if (thing.Id == id)
            return thing;
    }
    return null;  // ERROR: Cannot convert null to type parameter 'T' because it could be a value type. Consider using 'default(T)' instead.
}

This gives me a build error

"Cannot convert null to type parameter 'T' because it could be a value type. Consider using 'default(T)' instead."

Can I avoid this error?

11 Answers 11

up vote 811 down vote accepted

Two options:

  • Return default(T) which means you'll return null if T is a reference type (or a nullable value type), 0 for int, '\0' for char, etc.
  • Restrict T to be a reference type with the where T : class constraint and then return null as normal
  • 3
    What if my return type is an enum not a class? I can't specify T : enum :( – Justin Aug 30 '11 at 2:01
  • 1
    In .NET an enum is a very thin (and rather leaky) wrapper around an integer type. The convention is to use zero for your "default" enum value. – Mike Chamberlain Mar 5 '12 at 3:53
  • 21
    I think the problem with this is that if you're using this generic method to say, convert a Database object from DbNull to Int and it returns default(T) where T is an int, it'll return 0. If this number is actually meaningful, then you'd be passing around bad data in cases where that field was null. Or a better example would be a DateTime. If the field was something like "DateClosed" and it was returned as null because and account is still open, it would actually default(DateTime) to 1/1/0000, implying that the account was closed before computers were invented. – Sinaesthetic Nov 20 '12 at 22:26
  • 19
    @Sinaesthetic: So you'd convert to Nullable<int> or Nullable<DateTime> instead. If you use a non-nullable type and need to represent a null value, you're just asking for trouble. – Jon Skeet Nov 20 '12 at 22:28
  • 1
    I agree, I just wanted to bring it up. I think what I've been doing is more like MyMethod<T>(); to assume it is a non nullable type and MyMethod<T?>(); to assume it is a nullable type. So in my scenarios, I could use a temp variable to catch a null and go from there. – Sinaesthetic Nov 20 '12 at 23:12
return default(T);
  • This link: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xwth0h0d(VS.80).aspx should explain why. – Harper Shelby Nov 19 '08 at 14:59
  • 1
    Damn it, I would've saved a lot of time had I known about this keyword - thanks Ricardo! – Paul Betts Nov 19 '08 at 15:06
  • 1
    I'm surprised this hasn't gotten more up votes as the 'default' keyword is a more comprehensive solution, allowing the use of non-reference types in conjunction with numeric types and structs. While the accepted answer solves the problem (and indeed is helpful), it better answers how to restrict return type to nullable/reference types. – Steve Jackson Sep 15 '14 at 18:30

You can just adjust your constraints:

where T : class

Then returning null is allowed.

  • Thanks. I cannot choose 2 answers as the accepted solution, so I choose John Skeet's cause his answer has two solutions. – edosoft Nov 19 '08 at 15:16
  • 6
    Slightly wrong, it doesn't have to be IDisposable... – Migol Nov 29 '16 at 12:56
  • @Migol it depends on your requirements. Maybe their project does require it be IDisposable. Yes, most of the time it doesn't have to be. System.String doesn't implement IDisposable, for example. The answerer should have clarified that, but that doesn't make the answer wrong. :) – ahwm Aug 30 at 22:34
  • @Migol I have no clue why I had IDisposable in there. Removed. – TheSoftwareJedi Aug 31 at 19:36

Add the class constraint as the first constraint to your generic type.

static T FindThing<T>(IList collection, int id) where T : class, IThing, new()
  • Thanks. I cannot choose 2 answers as the accepted solution, so I choose John Skeet's cause his answer has two solutions. – edosoft Nov 19 '08 at 15:18
  1. If you have object then need to typecast

    return (T)(object)(employee);
    
  2. if you need to return null.

    return default(T);
    
  • Hi user725388, please verify the first option – Jogi Joseph George Aug 8 '17 at 12:57

Your other option would be to to add this to the end of your declaration:

    where T : class
    where T: IList

That way it will allow you to return null.

solution of TheSoftwareJedi works,

also you can archive it with using couple of value and nullable types:

static T? FindThing<T>(IList collection, int id) where T : struct, IThing
{
    foreach T thing in collecion
    {
        if (thing.Id == id)
            return thing;
    }
    return null;
}

Below are the two option you can use

return default(T);

or

where T : class, IThing
 return null;

Take the recommendation of the error... and either user default(T) or new T.

You will have to add in a comparison in your code to ensure that it was a valid match if you go that route.

Otherwise, potentially consider an output parameter for "match found".

Here's a working example for Nullable Enum return values:

public static TEnum? ParseOptional<TEnum>(this string value) where TEnum : struct
{
    return value == null ? (TEnum?)null : (TEnum) Enum.Parse(typeof(TEnum), value);
}

Another alternative to 2 answers presented above. If you change your return type to object, you can return null, while at the same time cast the non-null return.

static object FindThing<T>(IList collection, int id)
{
    foreach T thing in collecion
    {
        if (thing.Id == id)
            return (T) thing;
    }
    return null;  // allowed now
}

protected by Josh Crozier Oct 7 '17 at 17:47

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