21

I have class ImportProvider , and I want write unit test for Import method.

But this should be unit test, so I don't want to read from file to stream. Any idea?

public class ImportProvider : IImportProvider
{ 
     public bool Import(Stream stream)
     {
         //Do import

         return isImported;
     }
}

public interface IImportProvider
{
      bool Import(Stream input);
}

This is unit test:

[TestMethod]
public void ImportProvider_Test()
{
    // Arrange           
    var importRepository = new Mock<IImportRepository>(); 
    var imp = new ImportProvider(importRepository.Object);
    //Do setup...

    // Act
    var test_Stream = ?????????????
    // This working but not option:
    //test_Stream = File.Open("C:/ExcelFile.xls", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
    var result = imp.Import(test_Stream);

    // Assert    
    Assert.IsTrue(result);
}
40

Use a MemoryStream. Not sure what your function expects, but to stuff a UTF-8 string into it for example:

//Act
using (var test_Stream = new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes("whatever")))
{
    var result = imp.Import(test_Stream);

    // Assert    
    Assert.IsTrue(result);
}

EDIT: If you need an Excel file, and you are unable to read files from disk, could you add an Excel file as an embedded resource in your test project? See How to embed and access resources by using Visual C#

You can then read as a stream like this:

//Act
using (var test_Stream = this.GetType().Assembly.GetManifestResourceStream("excelFileResource"))
{
    var result = imp.Import(test_Stream);

    // Assert    
    Assert.IsTrue(result);
}
  • 3
    Any reason you can't just load a test file like that? – GazTheDestroyer May 13 '15 at 10:45
  • 3
    @user2451446, so your real problem is that you want to feed the contents of an Excel file into the code under test but do not want to read that data from an excel file. You're going to have to compromise somewhere: either make it an integration test or remove the dependency on the specific content of the stream. – David Arno May 13 '15 at 10:56
  • 1
    Have added info on how to add the file as a resource – GazTheDestroyer May 13 '15 at 11:13
  • 4
    @GazTheDestroyer, I love it when I claim a dichotomy of poor choices and someone adds a third, perfect solution, choice to the mix. I never thought of resources. That completely solves the OP's needs. Sadly I can't +1 a second time :) – David Arno May 13 '15 at 12:01
  • 2
    I disagree. If the file is embedded into the test, then it is still test vs. one unit of code. You abstract away where the data actually comes from and test just that the data can be processed correctly. There are multiple ways to embed the data. The most obvious are to either generate an actual file and then make it an "Embedded Resource", or to write code against an Excel DOM provider of some sort that dynamically generates data in the expected format. – Jonathan Gilbert Nov 7 '16 at 20:03
4

You can use a MemoryStream to provide a purely in-memory stream for your test.

0

Use an isolation framework like JustMock, TypeMock or Microsoft Fakes and you will be able to mock the Stream.

The bad news is that all of them as far as I know are paid.

  • I think it comes down to two things: 1) There are mocking frameworks like NSubstitute that are completely free to use, and 2) streams can be "mocked" without having to mock the actual stream type, because a) the Stream type itself can be directly extended in arbitrary subclasses, and b) if all you need is to be able to read or write data, the built-in MemoryStream type can supply an interface between Stream semantics and byte[] buffers. So, this answer does not accurately characterize the problem space or potential solutions. – Jonathan Gilbert Nov 7 '16 at 20:00
  • @JonathanGilbert: you may think that there are other options and you may think that they are better than this one but I think that it is not arguable that an isolation framework IS a potential solution for this problem. – Ignacio Soler Garcia Nov 8 '16 at 9:57
  • 1
    Okay, yes, it is technically true that you can use a mocking framework to make a mock Stream object. But, you can create a mock Stream object more easily with a simple subclass. On top of it, you state in your answer that all mocking frameworks are paid, which is just plain untrue. So, your answer is misleading, even if the first half of it is technically true, and your answer suggests doing something "the hard way", without indicating or acknowledging that there is an easier way. That is why other Stack Overflow members have rated it a poor answer. – Jonathan Gilbert Nov 8 '16 at 17:45
  • This is incorrect, the Microsoft Fakes are not paid.The answer should be deleted. – Skorunka František Nov 4 '17 at 15:04
  • @SkorunkaFrantišek: not paid? It is only available on Visual Studio ultimate or premium. Do you know how much is each of these? It's the most expensive one :D – Ignacio Soler Garcia Nov 5 '17 at 18:54
-1

My solution is to wrap Stream within your own class let's name it StreamWrapper which implements interface IStream. Now change Import signature to

public bool Import(IStream stream)

Now you are able to mock that stream and if you want to use it in production code you should pass StreamWrapper otherwise Mock.

  • How to mock stream with any meaningful data ? – Raskolnikov May 13 '15 at 10:58
  • That won't help as apparently the method requires Excel data in the stream (see comments to GazTheDestroyer's answer). – David Arno May 13 '15 at 10:58
  • @user2451446 it depends what is the content of Import method, what is used, what is expected etc DavidArno I don't understand what do you mean? If you wrap whole stream class you will be able to use all functionality that stream provides but with another class, I don't understand where would it fail. – MistyK May 13 '15 at 11:01
  • @Zbigniew, that mock class would have to supply Excel data when requested. That data can't be read from a file ... so the OP has an impossible situation. The mock class doesn't solve anything that a MemoryStream can't solve too. – David Arno May 13 '15 at 11:05

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