9

I want to store a value based on a key, composed of set of elements. Something like the example below. Of course I know that my pseudo-example wouldn't work, as the hash of the object will probably be it's address which will be unique for each new instance, regardless of it's contents.

    // in this pseudo-example this is my SET http://algs4.cs.princeton.edu/35applications/SET.java.html
    // but the idea is that values are unique
    HashMap<SET<Integer>, String> map = new HashMap<>();
    SET a = new SET();
    a.add(1);
    a.add(2);
    a.add(5);

    SET b = new SET();
    b.add(5);
    b.add(1);
    b.add(2);

    map.put(a, "w00t");

    System.out.println(map.get(b)); // I would want to get "w00t" because my key is the same set of elements

Of course I can just sort and concatenate the SET values as a string, with a separator and use that in a HashMap<String, String> structure but that just doesn't feel right. I'm quite new to Java programming so there might be an obvious solution that I'm missing.

5
  • You have to look into keySet(). Also it's a Set and not SET – Ali Gajani May 13 '15 at 11:11
  • I think there is a big problem here if you want to use collections for this job. They are all mutable. What if you add sets (2,3) and (1,2,3), but then you decide to remove a {1} from the second set? Better create a separate immutable object for this, otherwise it will be troubling. – pnadczuk May 13 '15 at 11:16
  • I realise this, but in my case I won't modify the objects once I store them. Ideally I would like to have an immutable object that I initialise from other iterable, but there isn't one that I can find :( – ddinchev May 13 '15 at 11:19
  • because all the collections are mutable. I just think that if you choose this solution it will be a poor design, and it will be vulnerable to errors. – pnadczuk May 13 '15 at 11:21
  • @pnadczuk For peace of mind, the code could be factored out to its own method to create a set and package it up with Collections.unmodifiableSet() all in one go, so the mutable backing set is never leaked anywhere. – gdejohn May 13 '15 at 11:21
9

If you use HashSet<Integer> instead of your custom SET (I'm assuming it's a custom class), it would work just fine, since HashSet overrides hashCode and equals (to be exact, HashSet extends AbstractSet which overrides these methods), so it can serve as a key in a HashMap.

However, if you modify a Set that serves as a key in your Map, you wouldn't be able to locate that key in the Map later. That's the risk you run into when using mutable objects as keys in a HashMap.

HashMap<HashSet<Integer>, String> map = new HashMap<HashSet<Integer>, String>();
HashSet<Integer> a = new HashSet<Integer>();
a.add(1);
a.add(2);
a.add(5);

HashSet<Integer> b = new HashSet<Integer>();
b.add(5);
b.add(1);
b.add(2);

map.put(a, "w00t");

System.out.println(map.get(b));

This outputs w00t.

9
  • 1
    @ddinchev It works fine. Try it and see for yourself. – gdejohn May 13 '15 at 11:13
  • 2
    @ddinchev Yes, I was inaccurate, AbstractSet does the overriding. – Eran May 13 '15 at 11:13
  • 1
    Why is this downvoted? This seems like the obvious and best solution to me. – K Erlandsson May 13 '15 at 11:15
  • 2
    @pnadczuk I did mention that using any mutable class as key in a HashMap is problematic. You would be in trouble even if they are not equal after the change, since their hashCodes would change. – Eran May 13 '15 at 11:22
  • 3
    Collections.unmodifiableSet() – gdejohn May 13 '15 at 11:23
0

Create a collection class and override hashcode() in a way where the same hashcode is returned for different collection instances with the same content. You can simply override the method in a class deriving from your desired collection. You do have to reimplement equals(Object o) as well.

2
  • How about two OrderedSet instances with a different Comparator? – ASA May 13 '15 at 11:34
  • Still works. If you check the docs for TreeSet, you can see that it inherits its equals() and hashCode() implementations from AbstractSet. "The Set interface places additional stipulations, beyond those inherited from the Collection interface, on the contracts of all constructors and on the contracts of the add, equals and hashCode methods." – gdejohn May 13 '15 at 19:24
-1

It depends on you of SET class implementation. You can either extend java.util.HashSet class or implement equals() and hashCode() methods in your SET class. Any solution will work.

-2

You didn't add set b to your map. First add both sets and then try to get value associated with the key b.

1
  • 2
    That's the OP's point - both sets have the same elements and should be identical, but an object added with a as the key can't be retrieved using b. This happens because he didn't override hashCode or equals in his custom set implementation. – Michael Myers May 13 '15 at 16:15

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