37

Let's say I have following interface:

interface Mammal {
    void marry(Mammal m);
    Mammal giveBirthTo();
}

However, this doesn't say quite exactly what I want.

Obviously, a human can't marry a dog, nor give birth to a cat. So how can I embed this information into the interface, such that the input type and output type can be changed automatically as it gets implemented?

47

You could use generics and change your design.

Something in the lines of:

interface Marriable<T extends Mammal> {
    void marry(T sweetHalf);
    T giveBirthTo();
}

... where Mammal is your top interface or abstract class, and Human, Dog, Unicorn etc. extend / implement it.

  • 2
    Should the interface not be named Mammal? There is not reason for adding another one. – Rafael Winterhalter May 13 '15 at 13:07
  • 1
    @RafaelWinterhalter well as I mention, you could have a Mammal interface or abstract class abstracting the top animal in that particular chain of inheritance. The Marriable interface would define the contract to marry one of your species instead. – Mena May 13 '15 at 13:09
  • You do not need the Marriable interface for this. You can simply create a recursive type as suggested in the answer I just added. – Rafael Winterhalter May 13 '15 at 13:19
  • 3
    @RafaelWinterhalter the problem in your methodology is that it mixes the scope of marrying and species. The "mammal" example is not the best to explain this, but imagine a HappyToBeSingleHuman or a JustPlainUglyHuman. They'd extend/implement Mammal but not Marriable. – Mena May 13 '15 at 13:23
  • But this is not what the OP asked for and neither related to the problem solution as one could have refactored the Mammal interface into such a hierarchy even without using generics.. All I say is that your solution adds an additional indirection. – Rafael Winterhalter May 13 '15 at 13:29
23

You can generify your interface using a recursive type variable:

interface Mammal<T extends Mammal<T>> {
  void marry(T m);
  T giveBirthTo();
}

This way, the Java compiler can give you a certain validation level. Notice however that this approach is still open to abuse. For example:

class Cat implements Mammal<Cat> {
  @Override void marry(Cat cat) { ... }
  @Override Cat giveBirthTo() { ... }
}

class Dog implements Mammal<Cat> { // implements wrong interface
  @Override void marry(Cat cat) { ... }
  @Override Cat giveBirthTo() { ... }
}

The compiler can only assure that you implement the Mammal interface by some sub type of the same interface, but not by the particular class that implements it. This latter type constraint cannot be expressed in the Java programming language.

  • 5
    For your Googling pleasure, this is called F-bounded quantification. – Jörg W Mittag May 13 '15 at 17:00
1

Generics. Try with

 private static interface Race {
}

private static class Human implements Race {}
private static class Canine implements Race {}

private static interface Being<R extends Race> {
    void marry(Being<R> other);
    Being<R> giveBirthTo();
}

private void tryMe() {
    Being<Human> aHuman = new Being<Human>() {

        @Override
        public void marry(Being<Human> other) {
        }

        @Override
        public Being<Human> giveBirthTo() {
            return null;
        }
    };

    Being<Canine> aCanine = new Being<Canine>() {

        @Override
        public void marry(Being<Canine> other) {
        }

        @Override
        public Being<Canine> giveBirthTo() {
            return null;
        }
    };

    aHuman.marry(aCanine); // not possible
}

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