54

I would like to use a generic type to ensure, that the arguments of a method are of the same type, like this:

public static <T> void x(T a, T b)

I would assume that the two arguments (a and b), that are passed to this method, would always have to be of the same type. But to my surprise I was able to pass arguments of any type (even primitives) to method x, as if T is erased to Object, no matter what arguments are passed.

The only work-around I found so far, was to use 'extends' like this:

public static <T, U extends T> void x(T a, U b)

But although I can live with it, it is not what I wanted.

Is there a way to use a generic type to force the type of all arguments of a method?

4
  • 7
    Show the calling code.
    – GriffeyDog
    Commented May 13, 2015 at 14:05
  • 9
    What's your ultimate goal? If it's that the runtime type of the two objects is the same, you can't do that at compile time. Consider: Number n1 = Integer.valueOf(1); Number n2 = Double.valueOf(2.3); x(n1, n2). But it's hard to give more guidance than that without knowing what you're ultimately trying to accomplish.
    – yshavit
    Commented May 13, 2015 at 14:10
  • 2
    What are you doing that requires this? Why does it matter?
    – Radiodef
    Commented May 13, 2015 at 14:20
  • 5
    No matter what, if you explicitly call this as x((Object) a, (Object) b), it will work. You cannot stop that from working in the Java type system, no matter what you do. Commented May 13, 2015 at 17:02

6 Answers 6

30

If I understand correctly, one way to do it is to explicitly specify the type of T instead of letting the compiler infer its type to be of the most direct superclass in the case of two objects of different types being passed in as arguments. Take something like this, for example:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test.x(5.0, 5);          // This works since type is inferred to be Number
        Test.<Integer>x(5, 5);   // This works since type is stated to be Integer
        Test.<Integer>x(5.0, 5); // This doesn't; type is stated to be Integer and Double is passed in
    }

    public static <T> void x(T a, T b) {
    }
}
3
  • Thanks for the answer, I nearly took it as the final one, but I liked that of Barteks2x just a little more...
    – sys64738
    Commented May 18, 2015 at 15:08
  • Thanks! and How to call with instance method instead of static one like above? Commented Jul 1, 2019 at 15:33
  • The same as static method - instance.<Type>method()
    – barteks2x
    Commented Mar 17, 2020 at 13:39
21

If I understand your question correctly, you want this:

x(10, "x");

to fail at compile time. Now consider doing this:

Integer i = 10;
String s = "x";
Object o1 = i;
Object o2 = s;
x(o1, o2);

In this case they are both objects - the same type. I don't think there is any way to really enforce what you want - when you cast your argument to Object it is always possible to call it with two different types without any warnings/errors.

You can specify the type you want to use by using it like this:

ClassName.<Type>x(obj1, obj2);

And it's proably the only way to do it.

5
  • 1
    +1 for making understanding simple concept. Only one way to make two objects(instance) of same type by telling what type we need x<Type>. Else if we try to say two objects(instance) of same Type. Then, every object is of type "Object"
    – Panther
    Commented May 14, 2015 at 4:21
  • Thanks, this is the simplest and clearest answers of all and confirms my hypothesis, that T is always erased to Object. I somehow missed the possibility to explicitly set the type, when I read the docs - thanks for pointing that out.
    – sys64738
    Commented May 18, 2015 at 15:05
  • @user2207767 This does not have to do with erasure, but rather that T is unbounded so the argument to it can be anything.
    – Radiodef
    Commented May 18, 2015 at 15:15
  • Thanks! and How to call with instance method instead of static one like above? Commented Jul 1, 2019 at 15:32
  • If you want to call an instance method, you just replace the class name with variable name with your object. It works exactly the same way.
    – barteks2x
    Commented Jul 3, 2019 at 12:01
13

Why this should be problem in the first place is kind of nebulous to me. I suspect you've instead misunderstood something about the ways in which the type system is useful.

What can we do with a <T> void x(T a, T b)? Well, not a whole lot. Inside the body of x, T is the same as Object, so we could only do something like call toString on a and b to print them.

There's really no practical reason a and b must have the same type. Just that they have some type in common, and that type is Object or a subtype of it. In fact, there's no clear reason why <T> void x(T a, T b) actually needs to be generic at all.

  • The method body doesn't care what the actual types of a and b are because it couldn't use them anyway.
  • The call site doesn't care what the actual types of a and b are because x is a void method so it's a black hole.

It's more typical for a method to have a result, like <T> List<T> Arrays.asList(T...):

// This will cause a compile error because
// the type inferred must be compatible
// with the return assignment.
List<Integer> r = Arrays.asList(1, 1.0);

Or a bound:

// We don't care what the actual types of
// a and b are, just that we can call bar()
// on them.
// Note: this method does not need to be generic.
<T extends Foo> void x(T a, T b) {
    a.bar();
    a.bar();
}

Or a bound which asserts some kind of relation:

// We don't care what the actual types of
// a and b are, just that we can compare
// them to each other.
<T extends Comparable<T>> T max(T a, T b) {
    return (a.compareTo(b) < 0) ? b : a;
}
11

You can explicitly specify the type parameter, when calling the method. For example:

 <String>x("hello", "world");

However, if you don't specify the type-parameter explicitly and rely only on the type inference feature of Java, then I don't think you can, not only in Generics, but in general.

The method parameter's type is not a concrete type, but it's rather something that denotes a set of applicable types (even this set can comprise of just one type, in the case of final classes, for example).

For example, this method:

public void x(Something a) { }

denotes a method, which parameter should be of a type from the set of types, which are compatible with Something (i.e. Something and all its subtypes).

The same applies for Generics.

9

Presumably, you are not calling your generic method in a generic fashion, so it's treated like a call to x(Object a, Object b). In this example:

public class Test {

  static <T> void x(T a, T b) {
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    x(1, 2); // compiles
    Test.<String>x(1, 2); // does not compile
    Test.<String>x("a", "b"); // compiles
  }
}

The first call to x is not made generically so it compiles. The second call equates T to String, so it fails because 1 and 2 are not Strings. The third call compiles because it properly passes in Strings.

6

This worked for me

public static <T> void x(T a, T b, Class<T> cls) {
}

now this compiles

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    x(1, 2, Integer.class);
}

and this does not

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    x(1, "", Integer.class);
}
4
  • 1
    It can still be called like x("abc", 123, Object.class);.
    – Radiodef
    Commented May 13, 2015 at 14:13
  • 2
    @Radiodef but in this case both args are Objects Commented May 13, 2015 at 14:15
  • 2
    Yep, but, the point remains that it doesn't force a and b to have the same type. It's still impossible. We can still pass whatever we want to it.
    – Radiodef
    Commented May 13, 2015 at 14:54
  • My goal was to make the type enforcement as simple as possible i.e. without any extra parameters.
    – sys64738
    Commented May 18, 2015 at 15:02

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