2

I have a table

-------OT-----------
- id        - INT  -
- from_time - FLOAT-
- to_time   - FLOAT-
--------------------

Save value

- id - from_time -- to_time --
-------------------------
- 1  - 8.3       -- 12.3    --
-------------------------

My SQL query

SELECT * FROM (`OT` as wt) WHERE ( (12.3 < wt.to_time) );

Expected it to return no record. But it actually returned record id = 1.

I have tried with 0.3 to 15.3 and it is same but with 16.6 it returns no records. My MySQL version is 5.6.23.

Please help me, and why that happened?

4
  • Can you reproduce this in fiddle for us? Commented May 13, 2015 at 17:34
  • @GiorgiNakeuri - I don't think JSFiddle handles MySQL.
    – BSMP
    Commented May 13, 2015 at 17:38
  • 1
    You could try 12.3 < CAST(wt.to_time AS DECIMAL(3,1)) but storing as a decimal would be best.. Commented May 13, 2015 at 17:39
  • @BSMP sqlfiddle does Commented May 13, 2015 at 17:39

2 Answers 2

6

Floating point precision is not exact science. You should use the DECIMAL datatype instead of FLOAT

Reference: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/problems-with-float.html

4
  • 1
    To support your answer: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/problems-with-float.html
    – vandsh
    Commented May 13, 2015 at 17:39
  • 1
    I don't think this is the case because Op said that situation is the same for 15.3 Commented May 13, 2015 at 17:42
  • Thanks Tuan Anh so much!
    – Chung Le
    Commented May 13, 2015 at 17:44
  • Created local DB and Table to match OPs schema, tested comparison given the sql statement above (to make sure it wasn't some arbitrary string comparison issue or something) and any comparison greater than 12.3 returns no records. Could @ChungLe confirm the range was indeed 0.3-15.3? I am on MySql version 5.6.24.
    – vandsh
    Commented May 13, 2015 at 18:09
1

@tuananh is absolutely right.

So you can change type of your column or change your query:

SELECT * FROM (`OT` as wt) WHERE ( 12.3  < CAST(wt.to_time AS DECIMAL(15,4)) );

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!9/01434/5

But it would be much better to change your column type to simlify future use and to increase performance of queries you will create. If you use a lot of CAST it will slow down query execution time.

1
  • I made the same fiddle around the same time, but included more rows for testing. Commented May 13, 2015 at 17:53

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