4

How can I avoid the optional checking when accessing a Vec?

while !self.stack.is_empty() {
    let top_path;

    if let Some(top) = self.stack.last() {
        top_path = top.to_vec();
    } else {
        panic!("error (but can't happen, becouse the stack can't be empty becouse of the while loop)");
    }

    self.stack.pop();
    self.apply_grammar(top_path);
}

There are 2 problems:

  1. I have to check with the if let... statement (but I know I don't need it)
  2. I need an else panic, because without it top_path could be uninitialized (-> error).

Is it my mistake or is it Rust?

3 Answers 3

7

the irc helped me with the following answer:

while let Some(top) = self.stack.pop() {
    let top_path = top.to_vec();
    let mut is_terminal = self.tree.root.is_terminal( top.to_vec() );

    self.apply_grammar(top_path);
}

and this looks much nicer.

1
  • Note: in case you do not know, this is called Irrefutable Pattern. May 14, 2015 at 17:30
2

You could use the Option::unwrap method, which panics on None just like your if let ... else expression:

while !self.stack.is_empty() {
    let top = self.stack.last().unwrap();
    let top_path = top.to_vec();
    self.stack.pop();
    self.apply_grammar(top_path);
}

but in this case it would be even clearer to use a while let block as you mentioned in your own answer.

1

In this case, you should use an iterator. It's just as efficient (maybe more so), and is shorter:

fn main() {
    let stack = vec![1,2,3,4,5,6];

    // Consume the stack, pop from the beginning
    for i in stack {
        println!("{}", i);
    }

    let stack = vec![1,2,3,4,5,6];

    // Consume the stack, pop from the end
    for i in stack.into_iter().rev() {
        println!("{}", i);
    }

    let stack = vec![1,2,3,4,5,6];

    // Don't consume the stack, read from the beginning
    for i in &stack {
        println!("{}", i);
    }

    // Don't consume the stack, read from the end
    for i in stack.iter().rev() {
        println!("{}", i);
    }
}

In your example, Rust doesn't know there is any connection between is_empty and pop, so it has to handle the failure case in pop. An iterator exposes a more knowledgable interface to the vector, and can avoid checking for out-of-bounds to boot.

3
  • This won't work if you need to call methods that take self or stack by mutable reference inside the loop, however.
    – mbrubeck
    May 13, 2015 at 18:11
  • @mbrubeck sure, but then you aren't popping off the stack, and thus the example in the question would be different ^_^.
    – Shepmaster
    May 13, 2015 at 18:28
  • 1
    In the example from the question, if self.apply_grammar takes &mut self, then the while or while let loops will work but a for loop will not. Simplified example. (You could work around this with std::mem::replace.)
    – mbrubeck
    May 13, 2015 at 18:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.