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As the question says , I want to confirm whether counting sort algorithm is in-place sorting algorithm or not.

Wikipedia describes in-place algorithm as

In computer science, an in-place algorithm (or in Latin in situ) is an algorithm which transforms input using a data structure with a small, constant amount of extra storage space. The input is usually overwritten by the output as the algorithm executes. An algorithm which is not in-place is sometimes called not-in-place or out-of-place (or ex situ in Latin).

Stable sorting algorithms maintain the relative order of records with equal keys (i.e. values). That is, a sorting algorithm is stable if whenever there are two records R and S with the same key and with R appearing before S in the original list, R will appear before S in the sorted list.

and also somewhere below counting sort page :

As described, counting sort is not an in-place algorithm; even disregarding the count array, it needs separate input and output arrays.

if we assume counting sort algorithm as :

countsort(){
    for i = 0 .... n  //where n is size of input array arr[]
        countArr[ arr[i] ] += 1
    //and then traverse countArr[] and rewrite arr[] with sorted values where value>0

then how come is this not a stable and in place sort?

Lets say input key data is represented by numerals and satellite data by characters , then for following data:

arr[] = { 1a,1b,1c,2z,5c,6c,7e,8q }  // keeping in mind only keys are sorted

wouldn't this algo traverse 1a then 1b then 1c and rewrite them in that very order? And also same array is being overwritten , so we just need a constant space depending upon type of keys rather than number of keys.

Thanks.

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  • in-place algorithm means that the process can operate on ther same object not needing auxiliary storage for its computations, but it does not necessarily mean that sorting in-place is stable. However if i remember correctly (have a whole library of sorting functions implemented) counting sort is stable
    – Nikos M.
    May 13, 2015 at 18:26
  • @NikosM. I'm very much working with on the same object ( here array arr[]). I'll need some constant amount of variables though , for each type of sort.
    – hg_git
    May 13, 2015 at 18:30
  • 1
    You might want to finish your implementation of countsort, even in pseudo code, instead of just leaving a comment. May 13, 2015 at 18:31

2 Answers 2

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1. Not in place

Your countArr does not take O(1) memory, its size needs to be max(array_to_be_sorted) + 1. Since you are using non-constant extra memory, the algorithm is not in place, even if you overwrite the original array.

Basically, you break this part of the definition:

In computer science, an in-place algorithm (or in Latin in situ) is an algorithm which transforms input using a data structure with a small, constant amount of extra storage space.

Because your data structure does not use "a small, constant amount of extra storage space".

2. Stable

Like you describe, it will keep values in their original order.

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  • 1
    or range +1? I'm not applying count sort to an large array of numbers. There are different keys so that data should actually be range +1. lets say data contains only 1 - 100 which might get repeated over and over inside an array of 1000 elements. Still would it take that much size?
    – hg_git
    May 13, 2015 at 18:47
  • while I realize I'm deviating slightly from classical implementation of counting sort , still I want an answer for ^.
    – hg_git
    May 13, 2015 at 18:48
  • @hg_git it doesn't matter. You might have 2 keys that repeat a million times or a million keys that do not repeat a single time. It's still not constant and it still depends on the actual input.
    – IVlad
    May 13, 2015 at 18:51
  • 1
    Wikipedia has it incorrect. in-place also includes Theta(log n) because of recursion depth. In fact, I have seen Theta(log^k n) space algorithms being called in-place (k > 1). May 13, 2015 at 19:33
  • 1
    @hg_git it comes from the stack that has to be used to implement the algorithm (even if you don't use recursion, you'll have to manually allocate memory for a stack and use it.)
    – IVlad
    Jun 10, 2015 at 7:45
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As the question says, I want to confirm whether counting sort algorithm is an in-place sorting algorithm or not.

Counting sort is a sorting algorithm which could be implemented in both in-place and not in-place fashion.

  • not in-place: stable, O(N) space complexity.
  • in-place: none stable, O(1) space complexity.

Counting Sort wiki page has more information currently. For implemented detail, American Flag Sort has some code snippets which basically shares the same idea.

As described, counting sort is not an in-place algorithm; even disregarding the count array, it needs separate input and output arrays. It is possible to modify the algorithm so that it places the items into sorted order within the same array that was given to it as the input, using only the count array as auxiliary storage; however, the modified in-place version of counting sort is not stable.[3]

Below are referenced from counting sort chapter(6.10 key-index counting) of Robert Sedgewick's Algorithms in C which I found very helpful.

If huge files are to be sorted, the auxiliary array can present memory-allocation problems. We can complete the sort in place (avoiding the need for an auxiliary array), this space savings comes at the cost of the stability property of the algorithm, and thus limits the algorithm's utility because applications involving large numbers of duplicate keys often have other associated keys, whose relative order should be preserved.

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