8

In the following C# snippet I override the == method. _type is a number of type short. So I'm actually saying that two WorkUnitTypes are the same when those two shorts are the same.

public static bool operator ==(WorkUnitType type1, WorkUnitType type2)
{
    if (type1 == null || type2 == null)
        return false;
    return type1._type == type2._type;
}

Because R# warns me, and it is totally clear why, that type1/type2 could potentially be null I'm trying to catch that with the if statement above.

Now I'm getting a StackOverflowException which makes totally sense because I'm actually calling the override.

Question: How do I write this method "correct". How can I catch the case that type1 or type2 can be null?

My best guess: Maybe I'm just misusing == here and checking for equality should be done with the Equals override. But still I think the problem exists. So where is my error in reasoning?

9

You're looking for the ReferenceEquals() function, which will compare directly, bypassing your operator overload.

  • I didn't know that ReferenceEquals exists. This is actually the answer. Thanks. – Stephan May 13 '15 at 19:42
2

In addition to what SLaks said, you likely also want to return true if both are equal to null. So, like this:

public static bool operator ==(WorkUnitType type1, WorkUnitType type2)
{
    if (ReferenceEquals(type1, null))
        return ReferenceEquals(type2, null);

    if (ReferenceEquals(type2, null))
        return false;

    return type1._type == type2._type;
}
1

For completeness' sake: you can also cast the two arguments to object. This will use the implementation as defined in object and not your custom one.

In code:

if ((object) type1 == null || (object) type2 == null)

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