1

I have this code in a function in C:

char* root = "/home/OS/homework/user/honorsupgrade/HTML";
requestInfo->resource = "/bing"
printf("1\n");
int counter = 0;
for(counter = 0; counter < 100; counter++)
{
    if(root[counter] == '\0')
    {
        printf("True1\n");
        break;
    }
}
for(counter = 0; counter < 100; counter++)
{
    if(requestInfo->resource[counter] == '\0')
    {
        printf("True2\n");
        break;
    }
}
printf("2\n");
fflush(stdout);
strcat(root, requestInfo->resource);
printf("3\n");
fflush(stdout);
return open(root, 0_RDONLY);

...

Request Info's stuff, as needed

struct ReqInfo
{
    char *resource;
}

I have created two string (character pointers) in C, but for some reason when I pass these methods to strcat(), strcat() never returns. This causes the program to hang. I have tested to ensure that both strings have null terminators (so strcat isn't trying to concatenate more than it should). The program will print 1 and 2, but never print 3, meaning it never gets past the strcat() call, as I am flushing the buffer to make sure that there isn't a problem there. \

EDIT: I've created the struct outside of this block of code, I'm getting the same issues when replacing "requestInfo->resource" with a char* resource and making it "/bing"

  • You need to allocate memory for the resources field of the ReqInfo struct, so you would write char resource[MAXRESOURCE] (or allocate it with malloc) Same for the root variable that you declared. – Edward Karak May 13 '15 at 22:00
1

Attempting to write to const char *

Even though char* root is a char *, it really points to a const char *. And writing to that is undefined behavior.

char* root = "/home/OS/homework/user/honorsupgrade/HTML";
....
strcat(root, requestInfo->resource);

Code should allocate a right sized working buffer instead.

char buffer[1000];
strcpy(buffer, root);
strcat(buffer, requestInfo->resource);
2

Invoking undefined behaviour could in principle cause anything, which includes hanging your program. You invoke undefined behaviour when you pass a pointer to a string literal as the destination of strcat.

// root points to a string literal. This is immutable!
char* root = "/home/OS/homework/user/honorsupgrade/HTML";

....

// Oops! Writing to *root is undefined behaviour!
strcat(root, requestInfo->resource);
1

You are attempting to modify a constant string. The statement

char* root = "/home/OS/homework/user/honorsupgrade/HTML";

sets up the root pointer to point to the constant string containing your path. The memory pointed to by root must not be modified, and to do so invokes undefined behaviour. The call to strcat() attempts to modify data past the end of the constant string data. It sounds like the compiler put something important there, and you overwrote it.

0

In C the programmer controls and is responsible for memory allocation.

The code you provided will have an undefined behaviour, because you ask "strcat" (see "man strcat") to copy something into a place, which is not reserved (the end of memory occupied by a string pointed by 'root').

It is hard to say what you really want to do, but just to avoid the crash you should either:

char[<static_buffer_lenght>] root = ...
...
strncat(root, <something>, sizeof(root) - strlen(root) - 1)

which will make your program slightly bigger, or:

char *root = (char *)malloc(<size_of_dynamic_buffer>)
bzero((void *)root, <size_of_dynamic_buffer>)
if (!root) { <handle memory error here> }
...
strncat(root, <something>, <size_of_dynamic_buffer> - strlen(root) - 1)

which will make your program slightly slower

Have not used 'C' for a while, so some details can cause compilation warnings (anything within '<','>' you have to replace with proper text - of course).

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