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Unfortunately I cannot make this a procedure in this case. I'm setting the variables in the select statement and using them in my cross join. My Count(*) as Line Item is 0...

SELECT @p := `purchaseorder`.`PO` AS `PO`
      ,`purchaseorder`.`Customer PO`
      ,`customer`.`Customer`
      ,`work_order`.`Work Order`
      ,@l := `work_order`.`Line Order` AS `Line Order`
      ,`Line Item`.`Line Item`
FROM `work_order`
LEFT JOIN `purchaseorder`
    ON `purchaseorder`.`PO` = `work_order`.`PO`
LEFT JOIN `customer`
    ON `customer`.`RN` = `purchaseorder`.`Customer`
CROSS JOIN (SELECT COUNT(*) AS `Line Item`
            FROM `work_order`
            WHERE `work_order`.`PO` = @p
                AND `work_order`.`Line Order` <= @l
            ) `Line Item`
WHERE `purchaseorder`.`PO` IS NOT NULL
ORDER BY `purchaseorder`.`PO`,`work_order`.`Line Order`

What am I doing wrong?

  • 1
    the from clause is evaluated before the select clause. perhaps if you start with what you are trying to accomplish, rather than how you're trying to accomplish it? otherwise you should just be able to refer to the columns from the outer query directly, without using variables – pala_ May 14 '15 at 3:29
0

Thanks pala_

This works!

SELECT @p := `purchaseorder`.`PO` AS `PO`
      ,`purchaseorder`.`Customer PO`
      ,`customer`.`Customer`
      ,`work_order`.`Work Order`
      ,@l := `work_order`.`Line Order` AS `Line Order`
      ,(SELECT COUNT(*) AS `Line Item`
        FROM `work_order`
        WHERE `work_order`.`PO` = @p
            AND `work_order`.`Line Order` <= @l
        ) AS `Line Item`
FROM `work_order`
LEFT JOIN `purchaseorder`
    ON `purchaseorder`.`PO` = `work_order`.`PO`
LEFT JOIN `customer`
    ON `customer`.`RN` = `purchaseorder`.`Customer`
WHERE `purchaseorder`.`PO` IS NOT NULL
ORDER BY `purchaseorder`.`PO`,`work_order`.`Line Order`
| improve this answer | |
  • Note that MySQL does not guarantee the order of evaluation of the expressions in the SELECT list. The MySQL Reference Manual warns against this type of usage of user defined variables. (The behavior you observe now is not guaranteed.) The user defined variables are not necessary to obtain this result. The normative pattern would be to use a simple reference to column purchaseorder.PO in place of @p in the subquery, and replace @l as well. – spencer7593 May 14 '15 at 3:48
0
SELECT `purchaseorder`.`Customer PO`
      ,`purchaseorder`.`PO` AS `PO`
      ,`a_work_order`.`Line Order`
      ,(SELECT COUNT(*) AS `Line Item`
        FROM `work_order` AS `b_work_order`
        WHERE `b_work_order`.`PO` = `purchaseorder`.`PO`
            AND `b_work_order`.`Line Order` <= `a_work_order`.`Line Order`
        ) AS `Line Item`
      ,`a_work_order`.`Work Order`
      ,`purchaseorder`.`Order Date`
      ,`customer`.`Customer`
      ,`a_work_order`.`Part`
      ,`a_work_order`.`Description`
      ,`a_work_order`.`Quantity`
      ,`a_work_order`.`Price Each`
      ,(`a_work_order`.`Price Each`*`a_work_order`.`Quantity`) AS Total
FROM `work_order` AS `a_work_order`
INNER JOIN `purchaseorder`
    ON `purchaseorder`.`PO` = `a_work_order`.`PO`
LEFT JOIN `customer`
    ON `customer`.`RN` = `purchaseorder`.`Customer`
ORDER BY `purchaseorder`.`Order Date`,`purchaseorder`.`PO`,`Line Item`
| improve this answer | |

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