1

I starting learning C++ using the book, "Programming: Practice and Principles Using C++"

In my first drill, it gave me a bit of code to run and said that I should get an error and that I should ask someone else for help. So that's what I'm doing.

The error (as shown in Xcode, and was within the header file):

No matching function for call to object of type 'hash<char">' 

This is the .cpp file

#include "std_lib_facilities.h"

int main ()
{
    cout << "Hello, World!\n"; //output "Hello, World!"
    keep_window_open(); //wait for a character to be entered
    return 0;

}

The header file: (In Xcode, the disagreement is with the line return hash<char*>()(s.c_str()); It is around line 43.

/*
    simple "Programming: Principles and Practice using C++" course header to
    be used for the first few weeks.
    It provides the most common standard headers (in the global namespace)
    and minimal exception/error support.

    Students: please don't try to understand the details of headers just yet.
    All will be explained. This header is primarily used so that you don't have
    to understand every concept all at once.

    Revised April 25, 2010: simple_error() added
*/

#ifndef H112
#define H112 201004L

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
#include<sstream>
#include<cmath>
#include<cstdlib>
#include<string>
#include<list>
#include<vector>
#include<algorithm>
#include<stdexcept>

//------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#ifdef _MSC_VER
#include <hash_map>
using stdext::hash_map;
#else
#include <ext/hash_map>
using __gnu_cxx::hash_map;

namespace __gnu_cxx {

    template<> struct hash<std::string>
    {
        size_t operator()(const std::string& s) const
        {
            return hash<char*>()(s.c_str()); //HERE IT IS!!!!!!!!
        }
    };

} // of namespace __gnu_cxx
#endif

//------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#define unordered_map hash_map

//------------------------------------------------------------------------------

typedef long Unicode;

//------------------------------------------------------------------------------

using namespace std;

template<class T> string to_string(const T& t)
{
    ostringstream os;
    os << t;
    return os.str();
}

struct Range_error : out_of_range { // enhanced vector range error reporting
    int index;
    Range_error(int i) :out_of_range("Range error: "+to_string(i)), index(i) { }
};


// trivially range-checked vector (no iterator checking):
template< class T> struct Vector : public std::vector<T> {
    typedef typename std::vector<T>::size_type size_type;

    Vector() { }
    explicit Vector(size_type n) :std::vector<T>(n) {}
    Vector(size_type n, const T& v) :std::vector<T>(n,v) {}
    template <class I>
    Vector(I first, I last) :std::vector<T>(first,last) {}

    T& operator[](unsigned int i) // rather than return at(i);
    {
        if (i<0||this->size()<=i) throw Range_error(i);
        return std::vector<T>::operator[](i);
    }
    const T& operator[](unsigned int i) const
    {
        if (i<0||this->size()<=i) throw Range_error(i);
        return std::vector<T>::operator[](i);
    }
};

// disgusting macro hack to get a range checked vector:
#define vector Vector

// trivially range-checked string (no iterator checking):
struct String : std::string {

    String() { }
    String(const char* p) :std::string(p) {}
    String(const string& s) :std::string(s) {}
    template<class S> String(S s) :std::string(s) {}
    String(int sz, char val) :std::string(sz,val) {}
    template<class Iter> String(Iter p1, Iter p2) : std::string(p1,p2) { }

    char& operator[](unsigned int i) // rather than return at(i);
    {
        if (i<0||size()<=i) throw Range_error(i);
        return std::string::operator[](i);
    }

    const char& operator[](unsigned int i) const
    {
        if (i<0||size()<=i) throw Range_error(i);
        return std::string::operator[](i);
    }
};

#ifndef _MSC_VER
namespace __gnu_cxx {

    template<> struct hash<String>
    {
        size_t operator()(const String& s) const
        {
            return hash<std::string>()(s);
        }
    };

} // of namespace __gnu_cxx
#endif


struct Exit : runtime_error {
    Exit(): runtime_error("Exit") {}
};

// error() simply disguises throws:
inline void error(const string& s)
{
    throw runtime_error(s);
}

inline void error(const string& s, const string& s2)
{
    error(s+s2);
}

inline void error(const string& s, int i)
{
    ostringstream os;
    os << s <<": " << i;
    error(os.str());
}

#if _MSC_VER<1500
    // disgusting macro hack to get a range checked string:
    #define string String
    // MS C++ 9.0 have a built-in assert for string range check
    // and uses "std::string" in several places so that macro substitution fails
#endif

template<class T> char* as_bytes(T& i)  // needed for binary I/O
{
    void* addr = &i;    // get the address of the first byte
                        // of memory used to store the object
    return static_cast<char*>(addr); // treat that memory as bytes
}


inline void keep_window_open()
{
    cin.clear();
    cout << "Please enter a character to exit\n";
    char ch;
    cin >> ch;
    return;
}

inline void keep_window_open(string s)
{
    if (s=="") return;
    cin.clear();
    cin.ignore(120,'\n');
    for (;;) {
        cout << "Please enter " << s << " to exit\n";
        string ss;
        while (cin >> ss && ss!=s)
            cout << "Please enter " << s << " to exit\n";
        return;
    }
}



// error function to be used (only) until error() is introduced in Chapter 5:
inline void simple_error(string s)  // write ``error: s�� and exit program
{
    cerr << "error: " << s << '\n';
    keep_window_open();     // for some Windows environments
    exit(1);
}

// make std::min() and std::max() accessible:
#undef min
#undef max

#include<iomanip>
inline ios_base& general(ios_base& b)   // to augment fixed and scientific
{
    b.setf(ios_base::fmtflags(0),ios_base::floatfield);
    return b;
}

// run-time checked narrowing cast (type conversion):
template<class R, class A> R narrow_cast(const A& a)
{
    R r = R(a);
    if (A(r)!=a) error(string("info loss"));
    return r;
}


inline int randint(int max) { return rand()%max; }

inline int randint(int min, int max) { return randint(max-min)+min; }

inline double sqrt(int x) { return sqrt(double(x)); }   // to match C++0x

#endif

NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED

  • 1
    Did you compile with the C++11 option on? – NathanOliver May 14 '15 at 17:59
  • 7
    it gave me a bit of code to run and said that I should get an error and that I should ask someone else for help really? – Marco A. May 14 '15 at 18:00
  • UPDATE: I substituted the line for return 0; But is this the right solution? It did however work. – Fingers May 14 '15 at 18:05
  • Why are you polluting the global namespace, defining and undefining stuff and then including headers? Remove the <iomanip> coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/42085660e935ba6b – Marco A. May 14 '15 at 18:07
  • 2
    @MarcoA. The actual text is "Quite likely, something didn't work quite right. It very rarely does in a first attempt to use a new programming language or a new programming environment. Find the problem and fix it! This is a point where asking for help from a more experienced person is sensible..." Sounds reasonable to me, especially for a book written for first-time programmers. – T.C. May 14 '15 at 22:35
12

It's a const problem. Clang reports: Candidate function not viable: 1st argument ('const value_type *' (aka 'const char *')) would lose const qualifier.

Try:

return hash<const char*>()(s.c_str()); 

Previously you had:

return hash<char *>()(s.c_str());

But s.c_str() returns a const char * and you can't pass a const char to a function that's expecting a char *. See C++ Const Usage Explanation for some of the gory detail.

Also: top-tip. In Xcode when you get an error. Press Command-4. Open the little drop down arrow next to your error to see more information, and there's useful, amazing, life-saving, coffee saving additional information :)

  • Would you mind elaborating on "It's a const problem: Candidate function not viable: 1st argument ('const value_type *' (aka 'const char *')) would lose const qualifier." – Fingers May 14 '15 at 18:12
  • I've updated the answer a bit for you. Does that help? – JCx May 14 '15 at 18:18
  • Yes. While I do not yet understand the concept of Const, the program worked and its nice to know I can do cmd 4 to see my errors in detail. Thank you for your help. – Fingers May 14 '15 at 18:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.