26

This question already has an answer here:

I was wondering why list comprehension is so much faster than appending to a list. I thought the difference is just expressive, but it's not.

>>> import timeit 
>>> timeit.timeit(stmt='''\
t = []
for i in range(10000):
    t.append(i)''', number=10000)
9.467898777974142

>>> timeit.timeit(stmt='t= [i for i in range(10000)]', number=10000)
4.1138417314859

The list comprehension is 50% faster. Why?

marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters May 14 '15 at 20:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

51

List comprehension is basically just a "syntactic sugar" for the regular for loop. In this case the reason that it performs better is because it doesn't need to load the append attribute of the list and call it as a function at each iteration. In other words and in general, list comprehensions perform faster because suspending and resuming a function's frame, or multiple functions in other cases, is slower than creating a list on demand.

Consider the following examples :

# Python-3.6

In [1]: import dis

In [2]: def f1():
   ...:     l = []
   ...:     for i in range(5):
   ...:         l.append(i)
   ...:         

In [3]: def f2():
   ...:     [i for i in range(5)]
   ...:     

In [4]: dis.dis(f1)
  2           0 BUILD_LIST               0
              3 STORE_FAST               0 (l)

  3           6 SETUP_LOOP              33 (to 42)
              9 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (range)
             12 LOAD_CONST               1 (5)
             15 CALL_FUNCTION            1 (1 positional, 0 keyword pair)
             18 GET_ITER
        >>   19 FOR_ITER                19 (to 41)
             22 STORE_FAST               1 (i)

  4          25 LOAD_FAST                0 (l)
             28 LOAD_ATTR                1 (append)
             31 LOAD_FAST                1 (i)
             34 CALL_FUNCTION            1 (1 positional, 0 keyword pair)
             37 POP_TOP
             38 JUMP_ABSOLUTE           19
        >>   41 POP_BLOCK
        >>   42 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             45 RETURN_VALUE

In [5]: dis.dis(f2)
  2           0 LOAD_CONST               1 (<code object <listcomp> at 0x7fe48b2265d0, file "<ipython-input-3-9bc091d521d5>", line 2>)
              3 LOAD_CONST               2 ('f2.<locals>.<listcomp>')
              6 MAKE_FUNCTION            0
              9 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (range)
             12 LOAD_CONST               3 (5)
             15 CALL_FUNCTION            1 (1 positional, 0 keyword pair)
             18 GET_ITER
             19 CALL_FUNCTION            1 (1 positional, 0 keyword pair)
             22 POP_TOP
             23 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             26 RETURN_VALUE

You can see at offset 22 we have an append attribute in first function since we don't have such thing in second function using list comprehension. All those extra bytecodes will make the appending approach slower. Also note that you'll also have the append attribute loading in each iteration which makes your code takes approximately 2 time slower than the second function using list comprehension.

  • My apologies - you are correct. I stumbled upon that article yesterday and I didn't proofread well enough. – Joel Hinz May 14 '15 at 19:20
9

Even factoring out the time it takes to lookup and load the append function, the list comprehension is still faster because the list is created in C, rather than built up one item at a time in Python.

# Slow
timeit.timeit(stmt='''
    for i in range(10000):
        t.append(i)''', setup='t=[]', number=10000)

# Faster
timeit.timeit(stmt='''
    for i in range(10000):
        l(i)''', setup='t=[]; l=t.append', number=10000)

# Faster still
timeit.timeit(stmt='t = [i for i in range(10000)]', number=10000)
  • 1
    the "Slow" and "Faster" code examples create lists with 100000000 items (if we fix the indentation error) (setup is not repeated for the number loop). The list comprehension creates a list with 10000 items 10000 times. You might have meant python -mtimeit "t=[]" "for i in range(10000): t.append(i)" vs. python -mtimeit "t=[]" "t_append=t.append" "for i in range(10000): t_append(i)" vs. python -mtimeit "t=[i for i in range(10000)]", Though it doesn't change the conclusion (slow, faster, faster). – jfs Jul 28 '17 at 9:38
  • 1
    list is created in C, iteration performs at C lever, etc. This is one of the most pervasive, utterly false myths about Python. The list comprehension is faster because suspending and resuming a function's frame is slow, not because there's anything particularly special about list comprehensions. – Kasrâmvd Jun 29 '18 at 7:30
5

Citing this article, it is because the append attribute of the list isn't looked up, loaded and called as a function, which takes time and that adds up over iterations.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.