4

I was wondering, what technically would be the most efficient way.

What would be smarter to code with:

    if (args[0].toLowerCase().toString().equals("server")) {
        System.out.println("SERVER");
    }

Or:

    String host = args[0].toLowerCase();

    if (host.equals("server")) {
        System.out.println("SERVER");
    }

Keep in mind, I know that this variable is redundant. And that an argument can also contain a number, but that is not the case of my question. It's just a example.

When should you create a variable for an if statement? Always? Is it safer? Should I do it not, because I am wasting memory? Does it impact the performance at all?

4
  • 2
    What does it mean to be "safer"? May 14 '15 at 20:36
  • 1
    I would say, you create a variable (in this case) is you need to use it again. Otherwise it's easier to inline it.
    – GiantTree
    May 14 '15 at 20:37
  • Create a variable if you use it more than once, otherwise do whatever is more readable.
    – Bubletan
    May 14 '15 at 20:47
  • @ChiefTwoPencils No, it's ok. I got it. May 15 '15 at 11:27
10

By all means, create the variable. A single variable like that will never, ever be a performance bottleneck, never.

Always favor readability. Performance problems usually appear only in specifics parts of a system. When they arise, and not before measuring those (aka having numbers), you treat them case by case. Never forget: Premature optimization is the root of all evil.

In your specific case, you could go even further and create another variable, explaining the intent of the comparison:

String host = args[0].toLowerCase();
boolean isRunningUnderProduction = host.equals("server");
if (isRunningUnderProduction) {
    System.out.println("SERVER");
}

Much better than a comment. And explains the intent of the code within a glimpse.


A quote from Martin Fowler's Refactoring book:

The interesting thing about performance is that if you analyze most programs, you find that they waste most of their time in a small fraction of the code. If you optimize all the code equally, you end up with 90 percent of the optimizations wasted, because you are optimizing code that isn't run much. The time spent making the program fast, the time lost because of lack of clarity, is all wasted time.

In other words: if your programs are easier to read, they are easier to fix the slow parts, when the time comes (if it comes).

0
5

The memory impact of this is negligible, style and readability is more important.

The rule I use is to not create a variable for that unless it will make it unreadable to nest it all in the if statement, or if I plan on using it again later (perhaps inside the if statement). I find that single use variables make me think that perhaps it is used later and try to avoid them.

2
  • 1
    Will the memory impact not likely be zero as the compiler will inline it anyway.
    – Nattrass
    May 14 '15 at 21:06
  • Hopefully, yes, although it is hard to have 100% faith in "behind the scenes" compiler optimizations like that. I'm skeptical that the compiler can ALWAYS figure this out, mostly perhaps, but always? Maybe my skepticism is unwarranted though.
    – Necreaux
    May 15 '15 at 12:01
0

If the compiler is smart, he wont care too much about you putting it into one line or parting it.

This code has its structure due to the fact that its easy to read for humans.

The more important part is readability and how "clean" the code is, imagine you have more ifs:

public void doSomething(){
if (args[0].toLowerCase().toString().equals("server")) {
        System.out.println("SERVER");
    }
}

public void doSomethingElse(){
if (args[0].toLowerCase().toString().equals("server")) {
        System.out.println("SERVER");
    }

(...)

public void doEvenMoreStuff(){
if (args[0].toLowerCase().toString().equals("server")) {
        System.out.println("SERVER");
    }
}

The ifs are all the same, but what if you have to change something? Maybe the String "server", you'd have to go through your whole code and change every occurrence - and be sure to find every of them! So its easier to have variables, something changes -> you just change stuff in one place:

String objectToSearchFor = "server";
String output = "Server found";

if (args[0].toLowerCase().toString().equals(objectToSearchFor)) {
        System.out.println(output);
    }
}

(...)

public void doEvenMoreStuff(){
if (args[0].toLowerCase().toString().equals(objectToSearchFor)) {
        System.out.println(output);
    }
}

This is much safer to maintain and will help to find errors as it is easier to read also.

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