87

In jQuery, is there a simple way to test if any of a form's elements have changed?

Say I have a form and I have a button with the following click() event:

$('#mybutton').click(function() {
  // Here is where is need to test
  if(/* FORM has changed */) {
     // Do something
  }
});

How would I test if the form has changed since it was loaded?

2
  • 1
    Do you mean by action of some other script included in the page or as soon as the user has typed some text or clicked a radio/checkbox?
    – FelipeAls
    Jun 11, 2010 at 18:51
  • I should have added that I only need to check on a click() event
    – mike
    Jun 11, 2010 at 18:55

13 Answers 13

149

You can do this:

$("form :input").change(function() {
  $(this).closest('form').data('changed', true);
});
$('#mybutton').click(function() {
  if($(this).closest('form').data('changed')) {
     //do something
  }
});

This rigs a change event handler to inputs in the form, if any of them change it uses .data() to set a changed value to true, then we just check for that value on the click, this assumes that #mybutton is inside the form (if not just replace $(this).closest('form') with $('#myForm')), but you could make it even more generic, like this:

$('.checkChangedbutton').click(function() {
  if($(this).closest('form').data('changed')) {
     //do something
  }
});

References: Updated

According to jQuery this is a filter to select all form controls.

http://api.jquery.com/input-selector/

The :input selector basically selects all form controls.

6
  • 7
    Does $('form :input') account for the select, textarea and other input types ? or is it specific to the input tag?
    – Val
    May 31, 2013 at 9:42
  • 6
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems like, this method will say the form has been changed, even if someone makes a change and then "undoes" their change, manually reverting back to the original values in the form. In this case the form really wouldn't have changed with respect to the data, yet this method would say it had.
    – paul
    Mar 10, 2014 at 22:46
  • 1
    Thanks, yea I tried that (it's listed in another answer) but it didn't work for me. It seems like there are some special cases that trip that method up as well. Currently working with a plugin - github.com/codedance/jquery.AreYouSure
    – paul
    Mar 11, 2014 at 16:29
  • 1
    Good solution for this case! But if someone here wants to get the state of the form's content (like "IsDirty"), you might want to follow this solution: stackoverflow.com/a/26796840/665783
    – Jacob
    May 5, 2017 at 1:55
  • 1
    @Nick Craver : What if the form element is outside the form tag with form attribute as the id form the form. I have tested the case, bad luck it is not working.
    – Mahantesh
    Apr 20, 2019 at 10:26
54

If you want to check if the form data, as it is going to be sent to the server, have changed, you can serialize the form data on page load and compare it to the current form data:

$(function() {

    var form_original_data = $("#myform").serialize(); 

    $("#mybutton").click(function() {
        if ($("#myform").serialize() != form_original_data) {
            // Something changed
        }
    });

});
9
  • 5
    Excellent, this is the best solution out here. Thanks.
    – Anonymous
    Sep 7, 2012 at 19:05
  • 3
    I used this method once, and it became very slow when the form became bigger. This is a good method for small forms, but it is not the way to go for large forms.
    – mkdevoogd
    Apr 22, 2013 at 8:13
  • do you mean forms with files in them?
    – Udi
    Apr 22, 2013 at 17:26
  • 1
    This is good, but it would be better if instead of checking each time a control changes, directly check when the form is about to be submitted
    – Ruby Racer
    Aug 13, 2014 at 6:19
  • 2
    This is much better, so you can trigger buttons back to disabled, like "delete"
    – EliuX
    Sep 24, 2015 at 17:27
39

A real time and simple solution:

$('form').on('keyup change paste', 'input, select, textarea', function(){
    console.log('Form changed!');
});
3
  • 1
    Very good solution. Suitable for as you type form validation.
    – Bijan
    Dec 8, 2014 at 14:05
  • 1
    The best solution for me! Thanks a lot.
    – Ivan Pirog
    Feb 23, 2016 at 6:48
  • 3
    Consider using 'input' instead of 'keyup change' to handle right-mouse-paste, unless you need to support older browsers.
    – TrueWill
    Dec 29, 2016 at 20:33
10

You can use multiple selectors to attach a callback to the change event for any form element.

$("input, select").change(function(){
    // Something changed
});

EDIT

Since you mentioned you only need this for a click, you can simply modify my original code to this:

$("input, select").click(function(){
    // A form element was clicked
});

EDIT #2

Ok, you can set a global that is set once something has been changed like this:

var FORM_HAS_CHANGED = false;

$('#mybutton').click(function() {
    if (FORM_HAS_CHANGED) {
        // The form has changed
    }
});

$("input, select").change(function(){
    FORM_HAS_CHANGED = true;
});
0
3

Looking at the updated question try something like

$('input, textarea, select').each(function(){
    $(this).data("val", $(this).val());
});
$('#button').click(function() {
    $('input, textarea, select').each(function(){
        if($(this).data("val")!==$(this).val()) alert("Things Changed");
    });
});

For the original question use something like

$('input').change(function() {
    alert("Things have changed!");
});
4
  • This doesn't check <textarea> or <select> elements. Jun 11, 2010 at 19:11
  • After your edit...this seems like a lot of extra work and data being moved around, all you need is a boolean set to true when a change happens. Also, this still isn't form-specific, what if there were other forms in the page? Jun 11, 2010 at 19:19
  • +1 that's a good one, but it needs some work, bind it to form and set init.
    – Anonymous
    Sep 7, 2012 at 19:02
  • that's what exactly i thought :) (y) your rocked
    – R K Sharma
    Sep 9, 2015 at 11:53
2
$('form :input').change(function() {
    // Something has changed
});
2

Here is an elegant solution.

There is hidden property for each input element on the form that you can use to determine whether or not the value was changed. Each type of input has it's own property name. For example

  • for text/textarea it's defaultValue
  • for select it's defaultSelect
  • for checkbox/radio it's defaultChecked

Here is the example.

function bindFormChange($form) {

  function touchButtons() {
    var
      changed_objects = [],
      $observable_buttons = $form.find('input[type="submit"], button[type="submit"], button[data-object="reset-form"]');

    changed_objects = $('input:text, input:checkbox, input:radio, textarea, select', $form).map(function () {
      var
        $input = $(this),
        changed = false;

      if ($input.is('input:text') || $input.is('textarea') ) {
        changed = (($input).prop('defaultValue') != $input.val());
      }
      if (!changed && $input.is('select') ) {
        changed = !$('option:selected', $input).prop('defaultSelected');
      }
      if (!changed && $input.is('input:checkbox') || $input.is('input:radio') ) {
        changed = (($input).prop('defaultChecked') != $input.is(':checked'));
      }
      if (changed) {
        return $input.attr('id');
      }

    }).toArray();

    if (changed_objects.length) {
      $observable_buttons.removeAttr('disabled')   
    } else {
      $observable_buttons.attr('disabled', 'disabled');
    }
  };
  touchButtons();

  $('input, textarea, select', $form).each(function () {
    var $input = $(this);

    $input.on('keyup change', function () {
      touchButtons();
    });
  });

};

Now just loop thru the forms on the page and you should see submit buttons disabled by default and they will be activated ONLY if you indeed will change some input value on the form.

$('form').each(function () {
    bindFormChange($(this));
});

Implementation as a jQuery plugin is here https://github.com/kulbida/jmodifiable

2
var formStr = JSON.stringify($("#form").serializeArray());
...
function Submit(){
   var newformStr = JSON.stringify($("#form").serializeArray());
   if (formStr != newformStr){
      ...
         formChangedfunct();
      ...
   }
   else {
      ...
         formUnchangedfunct();
      ...
   }
}
1
  • Yeah all these years later I don't even use jQuery anymore. Observers and bindings all the way now! Nice though for anyone using jQuery.
    – mike
    Jan 22, 2018 at 15:36
1

You need jQuery Form Observe plugin. That's what you are looking for.

1

Extending Udi's answer, this only checks on form submission, not on every input change.

$(document).ready( function () {
  var form_data = $('#myform').serialize();
  $('#myform').submit(function () {
      if ( form_data == $(this).serialize() ) {
        alert('no change');
      } else {
        alert('change');
      }
   });
});
1

$('form[name="your_form_name"] input, form[name="your_form_name"] select').click(function() {
  $("#result").html($(this).val());
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<h2>Form "your_form_name"</h2>
<form name="your_form_name">
  <input type="text" name="one_a" id="one_a" value="AAAAAAAA" />
  <input type="text" name="one_b" id="one_b" value="BBBBBBBB" />
  <input type="text" name="one_c" id="one_c" value="CCCCCCCC" />
  <select name="one_d">
    <option value="111111">111111</option>
    <option value="222222">222222</option>
    <option value="333333">333333</option>
  </select>
</form>
<hr/>
<h2>Form "your_other_form_name"</h2>
<form name="your_other_form_name">
  <input type="text" name="two_a" id="two_a" value="DDDDDDDD" />
  <input type="text" name="two_b" id="two_b" value="EEEEEEEE" />
  <input type="text" name="two_c" id="two_c" value="FFFFFFFF" />
  <input type="text" name="two_d" id="two_d" value="GGGGGGGG" />
  <input type="text" name="two_e" id="two_f" value="HHHHHHHH" />
  <input type="text" name="two_f" id="two_e" value="IIIIIIII" />
  <select name="two_g">
    <option value="444444">444444</option>
    <option value="555555">555555</option>
    <option value="666666">666666</option>
  </select>
</form>
<h2>Result</h2>
<div id="result">
  <h2>Click on a field..</h2>
</div>

In addition to above @JoeD's answer.

If you want to target fields in a particular form (assuming there are more than one forms) than just fields, you can use the following code:

$('form[name="your_form_name"] input, form[name="your_form_name"] select').click(function() {
    // A form element was clicked
});
4
  • Just FYI, this probably won't do what you want - it targets the input elements of the "your_form_name" form, and all selects in the document. Also, for performance reasons, it is always better to use $.fn.find rather than just targeting descendent selectors, e.g. $('form').find('input,select')
    – dgo
    Jan 29, 2018 at 20:35
  • @user1167442 How about if we have more than one form? My example is for a situation when there's more than one form in a single page. Jan 30, 2018 at 8:49
  • 1
    But still - your example will find all the input elements that are children of the "your_form_name" form, and then find all selects whether they are children of "your_form_name" or any form at all. Your example won't work for multiple forms, unless you are only targeting the selects of those forms. Also, if you are referring to the performance piece, it is always better to use $.fn.find - faster than even $.fn.filter - to reference children rather than using descendent selectors. vaughnroyko.com/the-real-scoop-on-jquery-find-performance
    – dgo
    Jan 30, 2018 at 18:02
  • 1
    @user1167442, you are absolutely right. I missed the fact that select is being targeted regardless of what form you are in. I have corrected that. Thank you very much for pointing out. Cheers! Jan 31, 2018 at 9:42
1

Try this:

<script>
var form_original_data = $("form").serialize(); 
var form_submit=false;
$('[type="submit"]').click(function() {
    form_submit=true;
});
window.onbeforeunload = function() {
    //console.log($("form").submit());
    if ($("form").serialize() != form_original_data && form_submit==false) {
        return "Do you really want to leave without saving?";
    }
};
</script>
0

First, I'd add a hidden input to your form to track the state of the form. Then, I'd use this jQuery snippet to set the value of the hidden input when something on the form changes:

    $("form")
    .find("input")
    .change(function(){
        if ($("#hdnFormChanged").val() == "no")
        {
            $("#hdnFormChanged").val("yes");
        }
    });

When your button is clicked, you can check the state of your hidden input:

$("#Button").click(function(){
    if($("#hdnFormChanged").val() == "yes")
    {
        // handler code here...
    }
});
0

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