11

According to the pytest documentation, I can assert that a SystemExit() occurs, but I want to do more: I also want to verify the exit code and any messages. I tried the below code, but nothing prints and I'm not sure what I would need to assert to prove that I got the right error code.

    with pytest.raises(SystemExit):
        docopt_args = validate_args(docopt_args)
        out, err = pytest.capsys.readouterr()
        assert out == 'Foo'
        print out, err

When I run my test, it passes, but that is it. Nothing is printed and I don't get an assert error.

The code I expect to be executed is:

        print '\n' + docopt_args['-d'] + ' is not a valid date\n'
        sys.exit(-3)
12

This works with the latest pytest:

All you need to do is run pytest with the --capture=sys option and dependent the assertion outside of the raises() context (this bit is important for some reason!)

Example:

#!/usr/bin/env python

from __future__ import print_function

import pytest


def f(code=0):
    print("Foo")
    raise SystemExit(code)


def test_f(capsys):
    with pytest.raises(SystemExit):
        f()
    out, err = capsys.readouterr()
    assert out == "Foo\n"
    print(out, err)

Demo:

$ py.test -v --capture=sys test_foo.py 
======================================= test session starts ========================================
platform linux2 -- Python 2.7.9 -- py-1.4.27 -- pytest-2.7.0 -- /home/prologic/.virtualenvs/test/bin/python
rootdir: /home/prologic/tmp, inifile: 
collected 1 items 

test_foo.py::test_f PASSED

===================================== 1 passed in 0.00 seconds =====================================

Changing the print("Foo") to print("Bar") results in:

$ py.test -v --capture=sys test_foo.py 
======================================= test session starts ========================================
platform linux2 -- Python 2.7.9 -- py-1.4.27 -- pytest-2.7.0 -- /home/prologic/.virtualenvs/test/bin/python
rootdir: /home/prologic/tmp, inifile: 
collected 1 items 

test_foo.py::test_f FAILED

============================================= FAILURES =============================================
______________________________________________ test_f ______________________________________________

capsys = <_pytest.capture.CaptureFixture instance at 0x7f2729405518>

    def test_f(capsys):
        with pytest.raises(SystemExit):
            f()
        out, err = capsys.readouterr()
>       assert out == "Foo\n"
E       assert 'Bar\n' == 'Foo\n'
E         - Bar
E         + Foo

test_foo.py:17: AssertionError
===================================== 1 failed in 0.01 seconds =====================================

Which I think is exactly what you were after!

I did this in a clean virtualenv:

mkvirtualenv test
pip install pytest

The trick here is to read and understand Setting capturing methods or disabling capturing

  • It was a stupid user error.... I had the indentation wrong. When I looked at the example provided, I realized this. – Robin Siebler May 15 '15 at 10:08
  • Ahh yes I forgot to mention this :) Let me update my response :) – James Mills May 15 '15 at 10:09
  • 5
    To make assertions about the exist code you need something like this: "with pytest.raises(SystemExit) as excinfo: assert excinfo.value.code==1" – mvr Jul 26 '16 at 20:16
  • In my case, I didn't try to capture the code that was given (I just needed to test that SystemExit was raised) and it worked fine for me. You can verify that it actually works by commenting out your test code and put in like a = 1 or something like that to see it fail because SystemExit wasn't raised. – Sam Dec 14 '16 at 16:05
0
import pytest

def test_exit():
    with pytest.raises(SystemExit):
        script_exit()

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.