0

I am building an alerting system powered by Amazon services.

I drop a file onto S3 daily which spawns a lambda function (let's call it the Generator function) to process the file.

Generator builds alerts based on this file and posts multiple messages to an SNS topic (let's call it Outbox) - one message for each recipient calculated by Generator.

I have a second lambda function (let's call it Courier) subscribed to Outbox which should take each message and do something with it.

The Generator code:

// 'Generator' function

exports.handler = function (event, context) {
  console.log('Reading options from event:\n', util.inspect(event, {depth: 5}));

  var users = {};
  var userSubscriptions = {};
  var alerts = {};
  var artists = {};
  var tracks = {};

  async.waterfall([
    function downloadSubscribersFile (next) {
      // Do stuff
    },
    function downloadAndFormatActionsFile (next) {
      // Download data file and analyse
    },
    function publishAlerts (next) {
      // Now we have alerts built, we need to mail them out
      var recipients = Object.keys(alerts);

      async.each(recipients, function (recipient, callback) {
        var recipientAlert = alerts[recipient];
        console.log(util.inspect(recipientAlert, { depth: 10 }));

        if (alerts[recipient].actions.artists.length < 1) {
          return callback();
        }

        var params = {
          TopicArn: SNS_TOPIC_ARN,
          Subject: recipient,
          Message: JSON.stringify(recipientAlert)
        };

        sns.publish(params, function (err, data) {
          if (err) {
            console.log(err);
            return callback(err);
          } else {
            console.log('PUBLISHED MESSAGE: \n', util.inspect(data, { depth: 10 }));
            console.log('MESSAGE WAS: \n', util.inspect(params, { depth: 10 }));
          }

          return callback();
        })
      }, function (err) {
        if (err) return next(err);
        next(); 
      })
    }
  ], function (err) {
    if (err) {
      console.log('Error: ', err);
    } else {
      console.log('Process successful');
    }
    context.done();
  })

}

And the other function:

// 'Courier' function

console.log('Loading function');

exports.handler = function(event, context) {
    console.log(JSON.stringify(event, null, 2));
    console.log('From SNS:', event.Records[0].Sns.Message);
    context.succeed();
};

When my Generator function is invoked, I can see 12 messages should be posted to the SNS topic. There are no errors recorded when publishing these messages, and yet the Courier function only fires once.

I'm wondering if anyone's had any similar issues with this and whether there's something I'm missing here. It could be that there's something I haven't configured correctly in AWS but I'm pretty confident everything is set up as it should be.


UPDATE:

After looking at the messages I'm attempting to send, it seems the message that WAS picked up by SNS seemed to be the one with the smallest payload. I'm wondering if SNS is able to cope with lots of small, frequent messages to a topic...?

1

Yes, SNS can cope with high throughput on a single topic. However, there is a maximum message size 256KB, so if your messages are larger than that it might be the cause.

I see your Generator function is logging the messages, are you seeing 12 logged messages with message ids? I see you have a variable alerts which you are hoping to get multiple recipients from, but I don't see where you are setting it.

My advice: Add more logging before you sent the message to verify that what you think should be happening is actually happening.

  • Thanks for the tips - I've been seeing multiple logs printed for each message - no problems there. The problem still exists, but I've got round it by outputting the files as S3 objects instead, and using S3's event system to fire off another Lambda function. – mattsch May 20 '15 at 14:45
  • Wondering if the bucket events vs SNS solved your problem. I've been testing a few scenarios with batch uploading to a bucket and moving the compressed lambda function results to another bucket. More often than not, there's between 1-5 files that were last in line to upload and end up marooned in the initial upload bucket unprocessed. They seem to be invocation errors, but I'm not quite sure what would cause the problem. – jp_inc Jun 5 '15 at 17:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.